14

Consider the following (buggy) C++ code:

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
        std::cout << "Math is broken!\n";
        return 1;
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

This code is buggy because it calls abs (meaning ::abs) instead of std::abs. Depending on the implementation, ::abs might not exist, or it might be the C abs, or it might be an overload set including a version for double, like std::abs is.

With Clang on Linux, at least in my environment, it turns out to be the second option: C abs. This provokes two warnings, even without explicitly enabling any:

<source>:7:9: warning: using integer absolute value function 'abs' when argument is of floating point type [-Wabsolute-value]
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
        ^
<source>:7:9: note: use function 'std::abs' instead
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
        ^~~
        std::abs
<source>:7:13: warning: implicit conversion from 'double' to 'int' changes value from -0.75 to 0 [-Wliteral-conversion]
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
        ~~~ ^~~~~

On GCC, I get different results in different environments and I haven’t yet figured out what details of the environment are relevant. The more common option, though, is also that it calls the C abs function. However, even with -Wall -Wextra -pedantic, it gives no warnings. I can force a warning with -Wfloat-conversion, but that gives too many false positives on the rest of my codebase (which perhaps I should fix, but that’s a different issue):

<source>: In function 'int main()':
<source>:7:18: warning: conversion to 'int' alters 'double' constant value [-Wfloat-conversion]
     if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
                  ^

Is there a way to get a warning whenever I use a library function through the global namespace, when the version in namespace std is an overload?

  • 1
    Don't spam tags. C does not have a std name-space. – too honest for this site Jul 13 '17 at 18:02
  • @Olaf You’re right. It was only relevant because C++ includes large portions of the C standard library, but not in a way that makes C expertise useful for answering this question. I’m sorry. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 18:26
  • This seems to be the same question, but I guess it's answer is not satisfactory either: stackoverflow.com/questions/9066476/… – rici Jul 13 '17 at 18:33
  • Using C functions from C++ code never justifies the C tag, standard library or any other library. Otherwise every program would require the tag, as even PHP or Python use those functions. – too honest for this site Jul 13 '17 at 18:33
  • @Olaf What I meant was that if, in the process of getting a MCVE, the resulting code was valid as C code (and exhibits the same issue) even if the original code was C++, then I think it would be appropriate to use the C tag. If, as is the case with my question, the MCVE depends on C++ features, then the tag is inappropriate. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 18:49
3

Here's a solution. I'm not happy with it, but it might work for you:

namespace DontUseGlobalNameSpace {
// put all std functions here you want to catch
int abs(int x);
}
using namespace DontUseGlobalNameSpace;

Now, if you use abs() without qualification, you'll get a "symbol is ambiguous" error.

  • That would work, but it requires enumerating all the methods at issue. It wouldn’t take more than an hour to go through cppreference or the standard and look for those, but it’s still not ideal and there’s the possibility of missing something. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 19:02
  • It would also require including dontuseglobalnamespace.hpp at the top of all the source files, which I could accomplish with sed or something but would certainly not be an ideal solution. Especially on an ongoing basis; it’s easier to fix all the issues now than to ensure that they remain fixed as code is updated. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 19:06
  • Yep, that's why I not happy with this solution :) Compilers usually have an option to include a file. For example, gcc has -include to include a file as if you included it at the beginning of the file. – geza Jul 13 '17 at 19:11
  • Oh, nice, I didn’t know that. That might be enough to let me use this solution, although for now I’ll wait to see if somebody else has a better answer. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 19:13
  • Well, since nobody has had a better idea over the weekend I’m probably going to try this one. If it ends up working out in practice, I’ll accept it. – Daniel H Jul 17 '17 at 15:10
2

This is going to be difficult. The GCC <cmath> header simply includes <math.h>, #undefs its macros (just in case) and defines the C++ functions as inline functions which make some use of identifiers from <math.h>. Most of the functions in fact refer to compiler builtins: for instance, std::abs is defined using __builtin_abs and not ::abs.

Since <cmath> and your "buggy program" are all in the same translation unit, it's hard to see how the visibility could be separated: how the inline functions in <cmath> could be allowed to use <math.h> stuff, while your code wouldn't.

Well, there is the following way: <cmath> would have to be rewritten to provide its own locally scoped declarations for anything that it needs from <math.h> and not actually include that header.

What we can do instead is prepare a header file which re-declares the functions we don't want, with an __attribute__ ((deprecated)):

// put the following and lots of others like it in a header:
extern "C" int abs(int) throw () __attribute__ ((deprecated));
#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <iostream>

int main() {
  if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
    std::cout << "Math is broken!\n";
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}

Now:

$ g++ -Wall  buggy.cc
buggy.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
buggy.cc:9:7: warning: ‘int abs(int)’ is deprecated [-Wdeprecated-declarations]
   if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
       ^~~
In file included from /usr/include/c++/6/cstdlib:75:0,
                 from buggy.cc:4:
/usr/include/stdlib.h:735:12: note: declared here
 extern int abs (int __x) __THROW __attribute__ ((__const__)) __wur;
            ^~~
buggy.cc:9:16: warning: ‘int abs(int)’ is deprecated [-Wdeprecated-declarations]
   if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
                ^
In file included from /usr/include/c++/6/cstdlib:75:0,
                 from buggy.cc:4:
/usr/include/stdlib.h:735:12: note: declared here
 extern int abs (int __x) __THROW __attribute__ ((__const__)) __wur;
            ^~~

A linker warning would be simpler. I tried that; the problem is that this test program doesn't actually generate an external reference to abs (even though there is an #undef abs in <cmath>). The call is being inlined, and so evades the linker warning.

Update:

Following up DanielH's comment, I have come up with a refinement of the trick which allows std::abs but blocks abs:

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

namespace proj {
  // shadowing declaration
  int abs(int) __attribute__ ((deprecated));

  int fun() {
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
      std::cout << "Math is broken!\n";
      return 1;
    } else {
      return std::abs(-1); // must be allowed
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  return proj::fun();
}

Simple namespaces can be used. Also, we don't need the deprecated attribute; we can just declare abs as an incompatible function, or a non-function identifier entirely:

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

namespace proj {
  // shadowing declaration
  class abs;

  int fun() {
    if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
      std::cout << "Math is broken!\n";
      return 1;
    } else {
      return std::abs(-1); // must be allowed
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  return proj::fun();
}

$ g++ -std=c++98 -Wall  buggy.cc -o buggy
buggy.cc: In function ‘int proj::fun()’:
buggy.cc:10:18: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘class proj::abs’
     if (abs(-0.75) != 0.75) {
                  ^
buggy.cc:7:9: note: forward declaration of ‘class proj::abs’
   class abs;
         ^~~
buggy.cc:16:3: warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]
   }
   ^

With this approach, we just need a list of names and dump them into some header that provides this:

int abs, fabs, ...; // shadow all of these as non-functions

I used -stdc++98 in the g++ command line to emphasizes that this is just old school C++ namespace semantics at work.

  • But the GCC implementation of cmath puts them into the std namespace with using ::abs; etc. The deprecation tag carries over; if you replace the return 1; with return std::abs(-1); it still warns about deprecation. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 18:46
  • @DanielH I see: it is bringing them in with using and then just adding some overloads. Ouch! So the primary one inherits the warning and only the overloads are safe. That's pretty stinky. – Kaz Jul 13 '17 at 18:53
  • So unless the g++ headers are sanitized, it's down to requiring a warning when ::abs or abs is used, but not when std::abs is used, even when std::abs is an alias for the previous two. – Kaz Jul 13 '17 at 19:01
  • Yeah, that’s what I’d like. I don’t know if it exists, though. – Daniel H Jul 13 '17 at 19:03
  • 1
    Maybe worth noting that abs(int) is in cstdlib, not cmath – rici Jul 13 '17 at 21:22
0

This code will let you detect whether the trap exists in a particular environment:

double (*)(double) = &::abs; // fails if you haven't included math.h, possibly via cmath

But it won't help you spot the places you fall into the trap.

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