I have a layout similar to:

<div>
    <table>
    </table>
</div>

I would like for the div to only expand to as wide as my table becomes.

  • 79
    the effect is called "shrinkwrapping", and as answered there's a couple of ways to do this (float, inline, min/max-width) all of which have side-effects to choose from – annakata Jan 16 '09 at 16:32

34 Answers 34

The solution is to set your div to display: inline-block.

  • 229
    @leif81 You can use a span or a div or ul or anything else, the important part is for the container you would like to be minimum width have the CSS property display: inline-block – miahelf Nov 17 '11 at 8:23
  • 10
    if someone wonders : one can then center the parent of the table by setting "text-align:center" on it's parent and "text-align:left" on it (e.g. <body style="text-align:center"><span style="text-align:left; display:inline-block;"><table>...</table></span></body>) – bernstein Feb 15 '12 at 23:09
  • 11
    It does not work on chrome for me with span, but works using white-space: nowrap; – albanx Jul 7 '12 at 20:07
  • 47
    Please make note that once you have display: inline-block property set the margin: 0 auto; won't work as expected. In that case if the parent container has text-align: center; then the inline-block element will be horizontally centered. – Savas Vedova Apr 9 '14 at 12:09
  • 5
    inline-block did NOT work for me, but inline-flex DID. – mareoraft Oct 24 '15 at 19:12

You want a block element that has what CSS calls shrink-to-fit width and the spec does not provide a blessed way to get such a thing. In CSS2, shrink-to-fit is not a goal, but means to deal with a situation where browser "has to" get a width out of thin air. Those situations are:

  • float
  • absolutely positioned element
  • inline-block element
  • table element

when there are no width specified. I heard they think of adding what you want in CSS3. For now, make do with one of the above.

The decision not to expose the feature directly may seem strange, but there is a good reason. It is expensive. Shrink-to-fit means formatting at least twice: you cannot start formatting an element until you know its width, and you cannot calculate the width w/o going through entire content. Plus, one does not need shrink-to-fit element as often as one may think. Why do you need extra div around your table? Maybe table caption is all you need.

  • 27
    I would say inline-block is exactly intended for this and solves the problem perfectly. – miahelf Nov 17 '11 at 8:24
  • 6
    i think they are adding in css4 and it would be content-box, max-content, min-content, available, fit-content, auto – Muhammad Umer Aug 29 '13 at 2:54
  • 3
    The new fit-content keyword (not in existence when this answer was first written, and still not fully supported) lets you explicitly apply "shrink-to-fit" sizing to an element, removing the need for any of the hacks suggested here if you're lucky enough to only be targeting browsers with support. +1 nonetheless; these remain useful for now! – Mark Amery Sep 29 '16 at 17:38
  • float did what I needed to do! – nipunasudha Mar 15 at 12:19

I think using

display: inline-block;

would work, however I'm not sure about the browser compatibility.


Another solution would be to wrap your div in another div (if you want to maintain the block behavior):

HTML:

<div>
    <div class="yourdiv">
        content
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.yourdiv
{
    display: inline;
}
  • 22
    To answer the browser compatibility question: this won't work with IE7/8 on DIV elements. You have to use SPAN elements. – Matt Brock Feb 18 '11 at 14:26
  • @feeela - I always put a * in front of the zoom e.g. *display: inline; *zoom: 1;. I haven't tested for this particular situation, but I have always found in the past that the hasLayout hack is only required for IE7, or IE8 in IE7-mode (or IE8 in quirks!). – robocat Aug 7 '12 at 23:24
  • @robocat Yes it is indeed a workaround to have inline-block enabled in IE 7. – feeela Aug 8 '12 at 8:07
  • @feela - your comment makes no sense to me!I was suggesting putting * in front of the zoom as well I.e. *zoom:1; – robocat Aug 22 '12 at 18:12
  • 3
    Please explain why your solution of inline-block works. – HelloWorldNoMore Apr 26 '16 at 22:43

display: inline-block adds an extra margin to your element.

I would recommend this:

#element {
    display: table; /* IE8+ and all other modern browsers */
}
  • 12
    +1 - This is the best, and most clean, solution for modern browsers that also allows the element to be centered. A conditional comment with position: absolute is necessary for < IE8. – uınbɐɥs Jul 6 '12 at 9:22
  • 16
    Specifying display: inline-block does not add any margins. But CSS handles whitespace to be shown between inline elements. – feeela Jul 6 '12 at 15:05
  • Please explain why your solution of display:table works. – HelloWorldNoMore Apr 26 '16 at 22:44
  • 1
    inline-block makes the element impossible to position in its parent (e.g. if there's a text-align:center you cannot get it to stick to the left) display:table is perfect :) – FlorianB Jul 2 '16 at 14:34
  • This is the way to go if you have position: absolute – m4heshd May 22 at 2:40
display: -moz-inline-stack;
display: inline-block;
zoom: 1;
*display: inline;

Foo Hack – Cross Browser Support for inline-block Styling (2007-11-19).

  • 2
    Anyone having this issue should add all these styles. Firefox added margins when not using -moz-inline-stack – Justin Jul 17 '12 at 18:48

What works for me is:

display: table;

in the div. (Tested on Firefox and Google Chrome).

  • 3
    Yeah, especially if you need to center with margin: auto. That case inline-block is not the solution. – Zsolt Szatmari Jul 3 '14 at 13:12
  • 1
    Also note, that if you want padding work inside this element, you must set border-collapse: separate; style. It's default in many browsers but often css frameworks like bootstrap resetting it value to collapse. – djxak May 20 '16 at 17:38
  • Tested on MSIE 6 on a Windows Mobile 6.5 phone made in 2009: it gracefully degrades to a full-width div (which is unlikely to be an issue on a phone). If anyone's using a version of Internet Explorer less than 8 on a desktop, they're using an unsupported operating system (IE6 came with XP, IE7 came with Vista); I'd redirect them to a page telling them to upgrade to GNU/Linux if they want continued safe use of the Internet on that machine. – Silas S. Brown Jul 10 '17 at 16:56

You can try fit-content (CSS3):

div {
  width: fit-content; 
  /* To adjust the height as well */ 
  height: fit-content;
}
  • 14
    Which isn't supported in IE caniuse.com/#search=fit-content :( – Bartek Skwira Jun 7 '13 at 9:42
  • @BartlomiejSkwira Any substitute working in IE or Eclipse? other solution as inline-block not working to me..\ – DAVIDBALAS1 May 9 '16 at 6:10
  • This makes too much sense, of course it lacks support. – Sava B. Mar 6 at 17:33

There are two better solutions

  1. display: inline-block;

    OR

  2. display: table;

Out of these two display:table; is better.

For display:inline-block; you can use the negative margin method to fix the extra space

  • 1
    Do you mind explaining why display:table is better? – Nathaniel Ford Jul 11 '16 at 23:29
  • 1
    For display:inline-block, you have to use the negative margin method to fix the extra spacing. – Shuvo Habib Jul 12 '16 at 6:09
  • 3
    @NathanielFord, display:table leaves the element in the Block formatting context, so you can control its position with margins etc. as usual. display:-inline-*, on the other hand, puts the element into Inline formatting context, causing the browser to create the anonymous block wrapper around it, containing the line box with the inherited font/line-height settings, and insert the block into that line box (aligning it vertically by baseline by default). This involves more "magic" and therefore potential surprises. – Ilya Streltsyn Dec 8 '17 at 7:46

The answer for your question lays in the future my friend ...

namely "intrinsic" is coming with the latest CSS3 update

width: intrinsic;

unfortunately IE is behind with it so it doesn't support it yet

More about it: CSS Intrinsic & Extrinsic Sizing Module Level 3 and Can I Use?: Intrinsic & Extrinsic Sizing.

For now you have to be satisfied with <span> or <div> set to

display: inline-block;
  • 10
    intrinsic as a value is non-standard. It actually is width: max-content. See the MDN page on that or the already linked draft. – maryisdead May 20 '15 at 9:36

Not knowing in what context this will appear, but I believe the CSS-style property float either left or right will have this effect. On the other hand, it'll have other side effects as well, such as allowing text to float around it.

Please correct me if I'm wrong though, I'm not 100% sure, and currently can't test it myself.

  • Yes, in CSS 2.1. (CSS2.0 would make the float full-width,but only IE5/Mac actually does that). Tables and floats are the only display types that can shrink-to-fit their contents. – bobince Jan 16 '09 at 16:14
width:1px;
white-space: nowrap;

works fine for me :)

  • But then again my case was text inside a div, and not a table like the OP. – Rui Marques Jan 3 '13 at 16:57
  • for the ui slider of jquery this is greate because u do not need to set the width of the content item – CoffeJunky Jun 6 '13 at 21:14

A CSS2 compatible solution is to use:

.my-div
{
    min-width: 100px;
}

You can also float your div which will force it as small as possible, but you'll need to use a clearfix if anything inside your div is floating:

.my-div
{
    float: left;
}
  • 3
    min-width doesn't work in Firefox 3 and IE 8. – Pavel Chuchuva Oct 18 '09 at 23:27
  • 3
    It should. Which doctype are you using? – Soviut Oct 18 '09 at 23:35

OK, in many cases you even don't need to do anything as by default div has height and width as auto, but if it's not your case, applying inline-block display gonna work for you... look at the code I create for you and it's do what you looking for:

div {
  display: inline-block;
}
<div>
  <table>
    <tr>
      <td>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Morbi ultrices feugiat massa sed laoreet. Maecenas et magna egestas, facilisis purus quis, vestibulum nibh.</td>
      <td>Nunc auctor aliquam est ac viverra. Sed enim nisi, feugiat sed accumsan eu, convallis eget felis. Pellentesque consequat eu leo nec pharetra. Aenean interdum enim dapibus diam.</td>
      <td>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Morbi ultrices feugiat massa sed laoreet. Maecenas et magna egestas, facilisis purus quis, vestibulum nibh.</td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>

You can do it simply by using display: inline; (or white-space: nowrap;).

I hope you find this useful.

You can use inline-block as @user473598, but beware of older browsers..

/* Your're working with */
display: inline-block;

/* For IE 7 */
zoom: 1;
*display: inline;

/* For Mozilla Firefox < 3.0 */
display:-moz-inline-stack;

Mozilla doesn’t support inline-block at all, but they have -moz-inline-stack which is about the same

Some cross-browser around inline-block display attribute: https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/cross-browser-inline-block/

You can see some tests with this attribute in: https://robertnyman.com/2010/02/24/css-display-inline-block-why-it-rocks-and-why-it-sucks/

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0">
<tr>
<td>

    <div id="content_lalala">
        this content inside the div being inside a table, needs no inline properties and the table is the one expanding to the content of this div =)
    </div>

</td>
</tr>
</table>

I know people don't like tables sometimes, but I gotta tell you, I tried the css inline hacks, and they kinda worked in some divs but in others didn't, so, it was really just easier to enclose the expanding div in a table...and...it can have or not the inline property and still the table is the one that's gonna hold the total width of the content. =)

  • 2
    It's not the "proper" way, but IE6/7/8 often just don't play nice when things get a bit complicated, so I totally understand why you would do it this way. You got my up vote. – Craigo Mar 27 '12 at 6:26
  • I would do this, but I have to surround every single input box, so that's a lot of extra html. – NickSoft Sep 1 '15 at 8:51

An working demo is here-

.floating-box {
    display:-moz-inline-stack;
    display: inline-block;

    width: fit-content; 
    height: fit-content;

    width: 150px;
    height: 75px;
    margin: 10px;
    border: 3px solid #73AD21;  
}
<h2>The Way is using inline-block</h2>

Supporting elements are also added in CSS.

<div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
   <div class="floating-box">Floating box</div>
</div>

My CSS3 flexbox solution in two flavors: The one on top behaves like a span and the one at the bottom behaves like a div, taking all the width with the help of a wrapper. Their classes are "top", "bottom" and "bottomwrapper" respectively.

body {
    font-family: sans-serif;
}
.top {
    display: -webkit-inline-flex;
    display: inline-flex;
}
.top, .bottom {
    background-color: #3F3;
    border: 2px solid #FA6;
}
/* bottomwrapper will take the rest of the width */
.bottomwrapper {
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: flex;
}
table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
}
table, th, td {
    width: 280px;
    border: 1px solid #666;
}
th {
    background-color: #282;
    color: #FFF;
}
td {
    color: #444;
}
th, td {
    padding: 0 4px 0 4px;
}
Is this
<div class="top">
	<table>
        <tr>
            <th>OS</th>
            <th>Version</th> 
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>OpenBSD</td>
            <td>5.7</td> 
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>Windows</td>
            <td>Please upgrade to 10!</td> 
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>
what you are looking for?
<br>
Or may be...
<div class="bottomwrapper">
    <div class="bottom">
    	<table>
            <tr>
                <th>OS</th>
                <th>Version</th> 
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>OpenBSD</td>
                <td>5.7</td> 
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>Windows</td>
                <td>Please upgrade to 10!</td> 
            </tr>
        </table>
    </div>
</div>
this is what you are looking for.

  • kudos for display: inline-flex;. BTW this works without prefix for Chrome 62, firefox 57, and safari 11 – Horacio Nov 24 '17 at 3:06
<div class="parentDiv" style="display:inline-block">
    // HTML elements
</div>

This will make parent div width same as the largest element width.

  • is there a way i can apply this only for vertical size to minimize and keep horizontal large? – Gobliins Feb 22 at 10:15

Try display: inline-block;. For it to be cross browser compatible please use the below css code.

div {
  display: inline-block;
  display:-moz-inline-stack;
  zoom:1;
  *display:inline;
  border-style: solid;
  border-color: #0000ff;
}
<div>
  <table>
    <tr>
      <td>Column1</td>
      <td>Column2</td>
      <td>Column3</td>
    </tr>
  </table>
</div>

Just put a style into your CSS file

div { 
    width: fit-content; 
}

Tampering around with Firebug I found the property value -moz-fit-content which exactly does what the OP wanted and could be used as follow:

width: -moz-fit-content;

Although it only works on Firefox, I couldn't find any equivalent for other browsers such as Chrome.

  • 3
    -webkit-fit-content for chrome 31+. caniuse.com/#search=fit-content – Isius Apr 16 '14 at 21:42
  • As of January 2017, IE (all versions, Edge and mobile included) and Opera Mini have no support for fit-content. Firefox supports width only. Other browsers support it well. – Gavin Jan 11 '17 at 22:30

This has been mentioned in comments and is hard to find in one of the answers so:

If you are using display: flex for whatever reason, you can instead use:

div {
    display: inline-flex;
}

This is also widely supported across browsers.

I have solved a similar problem (where I didn't want to use display: inline-block because the item was centered) by adding a span tag inside the div tag, and moving the CSS formatting from the outer div tag to the new inner span tag. Just throwing this out there as another alternative idea if display: inline block isn't a suitable answer for you.

div{
  width:auto;
  height:auto;
}
  • This will not work if div contains inline (or inline-block) elements and they have different font-size and line-height than the div itself. – quotesBro Feb 13 at 10:15

If you have containers breaking lines, after hours looking for a good CSS solution and finding none, I now use jQuery instead:

$('button').click(function(){

  $('nav ul').each(function(){
    
    $parent = $(this).parent();
    
    $parent.width( $(this).width() );
    
  });
});
nav {
  display: inline-block;
  text-align: left; /* doesn't do anything, unlike some might guess */
}
ul {
  display: inline;
}

/* needed style */
ul {
  padding: 0;
}
body {
  width: 420px;
}

/* just style */
body {
  background: #ddd;
  margin: 1em auto;
}
button {
  display: block;
}
nav {
  background: #bbb;
  margin: 1rem auto;
  padding: 0.5rem;
}
li {
  display: inline-block;
  width: 40px;
  height: 20px;
  border: solid thin #777;
  margin: 4px;
  background: #999;
  text-align: center;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<button>fix</button>

<nav>
  <ul>
    <li>3</li>
    <li>.</li>
    <li>1</li>
    <li>4</li>
  </ul>
</nav>

<nav>
  <ul>
    <li>3</li>
    <li>.</li>
    <li>1</li>
    <li>4</li>
    <li>1</li>
    <li>5</li>
    <li>9</li>
    <li>2</li>
    <li>6</li>
    <li>5</li>
    <li>3</li>
    <li>5</li>
  </ul>
</nav>

  • This is visibly broken in the snippet for me in Chrome; clicking the fix button a second time produces different results to clicking it the first time. – Mark Amery Sep 28 '16 at 17:29
  • @MarkAmery on my mac I just tried it on chrome, safari and firefox and it's all fine: no visible errors, nothing on the console, consistent behavior. maybe it's something with windows... – cregox Sep 28 '16 at 19:17

We can use any of the two ways on the div element:

display: table;

or,

display: inline-block; 

I prefer to use display: table;, because it handles, all extra spaces on its own. While display: inline-block needs some extra space fixing.

Revised (works if you have multiple children): You can use jQuery (Look at the JSFiddle link)

var d= $('div');
var w;


d.children().each(function(){
 w = w + $(this).outerWidth();
 d.css('width', w + 'px')
});

Do not forget to include the jQuery...

See the JSfiddle here

  • This is broken if your div has multiple children; it simply sets the div width to that of the first child. – Mark Amery Sep 28 '16 at 17:32
  • @MarkAmery First of all, before you give it a negative vote, please read the question carefully, they asked for one child. If you are really curious how it can be done with multiple children see the revised answer. – Ogdila Sep 30 '16 at 13:08

I tried div.classname{display:table-cell;} and it worked!

I would just set padding: -whateverYouWantpx;

  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please add some explanation of why this code helps the OP. This will help provide an answer future viewers can learn from. See How to Answer for more information. – Heretic Monkey Oct 21 '16 at 22:00
  • It would take away some size of the box so he could make the box "not larger than its contents." – NathanielSantley Oct 22 '16 at 16:32
  • Isn't negative padding invalid CSS? – David Rector Nov 16 '16 at 23:06
  • Far from it. In fact I've used it many times and it's perfectly legal. – NathanielSantley Nov 18 '16 at 21:44

protected by jtbandes Aug 26 '11 at 8:18

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