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Our application deals with measurement data which has to be read in from a measurement device and is stored in a database.

We provide the option to bulk read & store many sets of measurement data at a time. Because this is a time consuming process we display a modal dialog box with a progress bar and a button to cancel the operation.

It should only be possible to cancel the operation after a complete set of measurement data has been read and stored.

The read & store loop is as follows:

ItemsToStore := GetSelectedTreeItems();
DlgProgress  := TProgressWithAbort.Create(Screen.ActiveForm);

try
  for i := 0 to Pred(ItemsToStore.Count) do
  begin
    if DlgProgress.Cancel then exit;

    DlgProgress.Description := ItemsToStore[i].Name;
    ReadAndStoreItem(ItemsToStore[i].Id);

    DlgProgress.Position := Succ(i) * 100 div ItemsToStore.Count;
  end;

finally
  DlgProgress.Free;
end;

The setter of the progress dialog's Position property calls a procedure named CheckMouseButtonInput which is currently coded as follows:

procedure TProgressWithAbort.CheckMouseButtonInput;
var
  Msg: TMsg;

begin
  // if the left mouse button was pressed while the mouse was at the
  // Cancel button call the application's message loop to process the event
  if PeekMessage(Msg, btnCancel.Handle, WM_LBUTTONUP, WM_LBUTTONUP, PM_NOREMOVE) then
    Application.ProcessMessages;
end;

From the application's message loop the following button click handler is called which sets the variable that is accessible via the property Cancel:

procedure TProgressWithAbort.btnCancelClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FCancel := true;
end;

Everything works fine. But I wonder if the above implementation of CheckMouseButtonInput maybe consumes too much CPU time. Would it be better to call GetQueueStatus or MsgWaitForMultipleObjects (with no handles and a timeout of 0) before PeekMessage?

  • Move that work into a worker thread. – Victoria Jul 13 '17 at 21:18
  • Calling MsgWaitForMultipleObjects without any synchronization objects has the same effect as calling WaitMessage. Calling WaitMessage followed by PeekMessage has the same effect as calling GetMessage. Even if this were a solution, it would be the most convoluted way to implement it. – IInspectable Jul 13 '17 at 21:23
  • We want the main UI thread to be blocked during the read & store, only the Cancel button should be responsive. So we don't need a worker thread. The current solution is a polling strategy scanning the message queue for a certain message. I am interested to know if GetQueueStatus or MsgWaitForMultipleObjects follow the same principle as PeekMessage or if they do their work by simply testing some flags or something (less resource consuming) like that. – DinkumOil Jul 13 '17 at 21:33
  • Polling the message queue is not the best solution. Even if you block the main UI thread, you should still let it process messages normally, don't try to send-guess how they work. A worker thread is a better solution for handling cancelation logic. – Remy Lebeau Jul 13 '17 at 21:34
  • 1
    No one tried to "cancel" by using the keyboard yet? – Sertac Akyuz Jul 13 '17 at 22:22
1

Because this is a time consuming process we display a modal dialog box with a progress bar and a button to cancel the operation.

Then the process should be moved to a separate worker thread. DO NOT run lengthy operations in the main UI thread at all. It should only handle the UI and nothing else. Even if you want to block the main UI thread until the process is finished, you should still let the main thread process messages normally, don't do it manually.

Start the thread, show the dialog, signal the thread to terminate if the Cancel button is pressed, and close the dialog when the thread exits. The thread can send UI updates to the dialog when needed, and check the termination status in between measurements. No CheckMouseButtonInput() logic needed.

For example:

type
  TCancelEvent = procedure of object;

  TProgressWithAbort = class(TForm)
    btnCancel: TButton;
    procedure btnCancelClick(Sender: TObject);
  private
    FCancel: Boolean;
    FOnCancel: TCancelEvent;
  public
    property Cancel: Boolean read FCancel;
    property OnCancel: TCancelEvent read FOnCancel write FOnCancel;
  end;

procedure TProgressWithAbort.btnCancelClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FCancel := true;
  if Assigned(FOnCancel) then
    FOnCancel();
end;

procedure TMyForm.LengthyProcess;
var
  ItemsToStore: TListOfWhatever;
  StoreThread: TThread;
  DlgProgress: TProgressWithAbort;
begin
  ItemsToStore := GetSelectedTreeItems();

  DlgProgress  := TProgressWithAbort.Create(Self);
  try
    StoreThread := TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
      procedure
      var
        i: Integer;
      begin
        try
          for i := 0 to Pred(ItemsToStore.Count) do
          begin
            if TThread.CheckTerminated then Exit;

            TThread.Queue(TThread.CurrentThread,
              procedure
              begin
                DlgProgress.Description := ItemsToStore[i].Name;
              end;
            );

            // make sure this function is thread-safe!
            ReadAndStoreItem(ItemsToStore[i].Id);

            TThread.Queue(TThread.CurrentThread,
              procedure
              begin
                DlgProgress.Position := Succ(i) * 100 div ItemsToStore.Count;
              end
            );
          end;
        finally
          DlgProgress.ModalResult := mrClose;
        end;
      end
    );
    try
      StoreThread.FreeOnTerminate := False;
      StoreThread.Start;    
      try
        DlgProgress.OnCancel := StoreThread.Terminate;
        DlgProgress.ShowModal;
      finally
        StoreThread.Terminate;
        StoreThread.WaitFor;
      end;
    finally
      StoreThread.Free;
    end;
  finally
    DlgProgress.Free;
  end;
end;

Alternatively:

var
  ItemsToStore: TListOfWhatever;
  StoreThread: TThread;
  DlgProgress: TProgressWithAbort;
  ...

procedure TMyForm.StartLengthyProcess;
begin
  ItemsToStore := GetSelectedTreeItems();

  StoreThread := TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
    procedure
    var
      i: Integer;
    begin
      for i := 0 to Pred(ItemsToStore.Count) do
      begin
        if TThread.CheckTerminated then Exit;

        TThread.Queue(TThread.CurrentThread,
          procedure
          begin
            DlgProgress.Description := ItemsToStore[i].Name;
          end;
        );

        // make sure this function is thread-safe!
        ReadAndStoreItem(ItemsToStore[i].Id);

        TThread.Queue(TThread.CurrentThread,
          procedure
          begin
            DlgProgress.Position := Succ(i) * 100 div ItemsToStore.Count;
          end
        );
      end;
    end
  );

  StoreThread.OnTerminate := LengthyProcessFinished;

  DlgProgress := TProgressWithAbort.Create(Self);
  DlgProgress.OnCancel := StoreThread.Terminate;
  DlgProgress.Show;
  // disable the rest of the UI as needed..

  StoreThread.Start;
end;

procedure TMyForm.LengthyProcessFinished(Sender: TObject);
begin
  StoreThread := nil;
  FreeAndNil(DlgProgress);
  // enable the rest of the UI as needed..
end;
  • Although I don't think we can use your solutions I want to thank you for your effort (tried to vote up your posting but I have not enough reputation so it doesn't count). The read & store loop I posted above is a VERY simplified version of what really happens. Also during the process a tree and its data model gets constantly updated. If we move the read & store logic to a worker thread we would have to move a lot more code. We work on the application for nearly 8 years and it has become a piece of software of approximately 2 million lines of code - significant changes are hard to realize. – DinkumOil Jul 13 '17 at 22:13
  • In that case, you have to resort to manual message processing. Application.ProcessMessages() is going to process every message in the queue, so filtering on just WM_LBUTTONUP isn't very useful with it. I would use MsgWaitForMultipleObjects() or GetQueueStatus() with the flags set to QS_ALLINPUT. Or, to allow only user input and painting, try using QS_INPUT | QS_PAINT flags, and then use a PeekMessage(PM_REMOVE) loop with PM_QS_INPUT | PM_QS_PAINT flags followed by TranslateMessage() and DispatchMessage() for each message (as Application.ProcessMessage() is private). – Remy Lebeau Jul 13 '17 at 22:48
  • Also don't forget that focusable button can be clicked also by keyboard (e.g. space key). – Victoria Jul 13 '17 at 23:31
  • @Victoria: QS_INPUT includes keyboard, mouse, and raw input messages. – Remy Lebeau Jul 14 '17 at 0:04
  • @RemyLebeau The ideas in your last comment seem as if it would be possible to get them work. We'll check it out. Thanks! – DinkumOil Jul 14 '17 at 7:52

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