10

I'm currently using this piece of code to generate my list of source files for CMake to compile my C++ project:

file(GLOB CPP_FILES src/*.cpp)

As I have read here that this is discouraged by CMake I would like to know if I can list the source files explicitly for CMake using CMake, as I am not familiar with scripting languages like Python.

I'm asking this as it would require a lot of work to add all the cpp files manually into CMake, especially when working with multiply people.

The project is platform-independent and my source files are in a sub-folder.

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  • 2
    I would like to know if I can list the source files explicitly I do that for almost all of my projects. Even ones with a thousand source files.
    – drescherjm
    Jul 13, 2017 at 21:11
  • 1
    CMake won't generate a list and modify a CMakeLists.txt if that is what you are after. I manually add the filenames one by one as I write the code.
    – drescherjm
    Jul 13, 2017 at 21:13
  • Thats what I am after, as it would require a lot of work to add all files manually to CMake, especially when working with multiply people. Jul 14, 2017 at 11:23

1 Answer 1

13

There is no native method for CMake to do this for you.

What you can do for large or shared projects is use a script, that could be created by anything that can scan the filesystem or some other repository, to generate a CMake file that lists the source files.

Then you can just include() this generated CMake file.

Instructions in the CMake file could be using target_sources() for a known target.

CMakeLists.txt:

add_executable(myexe "")
include(sourcelist)

sourcelist.cmake:

target_sources(myexe PRIVATE
    mysourcefile1.cpp
    mysourcefile2.cpp
)

Or via appending to a variable:

CMakeLists.txt:

include(sourcelist)
add_executable(myexe ${sources})

sourcelist.cmake:

set(sources ${sources} 
    mysourcefile1.cpp
    mysourcefile2.cpp
)
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    Could you explain for which reason the PRIVATE keyword is used after myexe? Jul 14, 2017 at 14:51
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    @shadowdragon it is just who uses the information you are adding. "PRIVATE" says only this current target uses it. "INTERFACE" says only other targets use it and this current target is not using it. "PUBLIC" says both this target and other targets uses the information. Since the information in this case is just source file names for an executable, it is almost certainly completely useless to other targets because executable targets almost never used by other targets (unlike libraries) and even if they are, it wouldn't be for sources. In this case, you can use either PRIVATE or PUBLIC.
    – utopia
    Jul 14, 2017 at 15:07

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