10

Say that I have this task:

def do_stuff_for_some_time(some_id):
    e = Model.objects.get(id=some_id)
    e.domanystuff()

and I'm using it like so:

do_stuff_for_some_time.apply_async(args=[some_id], queue='some_queue')

The problem I'm facing is that there are a lot of repetitive tasks with the same arg param and it's boggling down the queue.

Is it possible to apply async only if the same args and the same task is not in the queue?

2

celery-singleton solves this requirement

Caveat: requires redis broker (for distributed locks)

pip install celery-singleton

Use the Singleton task base class:

from celery_singleton import Singleton

@celery_app.task(base=Singleton)
def do_stuff_for_some_time(some_id):
    e = Model.objects.get(id=some_id)
    e.domanystuff()


from the docs:

calls to do_stuff.delay() will either queue a new task or return an AsyncResult for the currently queued/running instance of the task

2

I am not really sure if celery has such an option. However, I would like to suggest a work-around.

1) Create a model for all the celery tasks being queued. In that model, save the task_name, queue_name as well as the parameters

2) Use a get_or_create on that model for every celery task that is ready to be queued.

3) If created = True from step 2, allow the task to be added to the queue, else do not add the task into the queue

2
+25

I would try a mix of a cache lock and a task result backend which stores each task's results:

  • The cache lock will prevent tasks with the same arguments to get added to the queue multiple times. Celery documentation contains a nice example of cache lock implementation here, but if you don't want to create it yourself, you can use the celery-once module.

  • For a task result backend, we will use the recommended django-celery-results, which creates a TaskResult table that we will query for task results.

Example:

  • Install and configure django-celery-results:

    settings.py:

    INSTALLED_APPS = (
        ...,
        'django_celery_results',
    )
    CELERY_RESULT_BACKEND = 'django-db'  # You can also use 'django-cache'
    

    ./manage.py migrate django_celery_results

  • Install and configure the celery-once module:

    tasks.py:

    from celery import Celery
    from celery_once import QueueOnce
    from time import sleep
    
    celery = Celery('tasks', broker='amqp://guest@localhost//')
    celery.conf.ONCE = {
        'backend': 'celery_once.backends.Redis',
        'settings': {
            'url': 'redis://localhost:6379/0',
            'default_timeout': 60 * 60
         }
    }
    
    @celery.task(base=QueueOnce)
    def do_stuff_for_some_time(some_id):
        e = Model.objects.get(id=some_id)
        e.domanystuff()
    

    At this point, if a task with the same arguments is going to be executed,
    an AlreadyQueued exception will be raised.

  • Let's use the above:

    from django_celery_results.models import TaskResult
    
    try:
        result = do_stuff_for_some_time(some_id)
    except AlreadyQueued:
        result = TaskResult.objects.get(task_args=some_id)
    

Caveats:

  • Mind that at the time an AlreadyQueued exception arises, the initial task with argument=some_id may not be executed and therefore it will not have results in TaskResult table.

  • Mind everything in your code that can go wrong and hang any of the above processes (because it will do that!).

Extra Reading:

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