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I'm using an UPDATE cursor as follows on SQL 2005:

DECLARE myCursor CURSOR FOR
        SELECT RowID, Value FROM myTable
        FOR UPDATE OF Value;
OPEN myCursor;
FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
    UPDATE myTable SET Value = 42
    WHERE CURRENT OF myCursor
    FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor
END
CLOSE myCursor
DEALLOCATE myCursor

(Thanks to Matt for his correct answer on my prior question concerning this cursor syntax. And yes, I do need a cursor, because each row's new value is actually based on a complicated calculation that depends on the prior rows.)

This works correctly, updating all the Values. The problem is that it returns a result set for each row updated, consisting of RowID, Value (interestingly, its showing the result from before the row is updated). Eventually, I get the following error:

The query has exceeded the maximum number of result sets that can be displayed in the results grid. Only the first 100 result sets are displayed in the grid.

Any way to suppress these result sets? SET NOCOUNT ON doesn't do the trick. Is this just an issue I see running it directly in SSMS? Or will it actually try to return hundreds of result sets when I put this cursor inside a stored proc?

EDIT: Looks like it has nothing to do with the UPDATE.

Using FETCH NEXT FROM myCURSOR the way I am actually does return a result set of the next row from the cursor.

If I change it to FETCH NEXT FROM myCURSOR INTO @variables, then it doesn't return a result set.

So I guess the question now is: Since I'm using WHERE CURRENT OF, I don't really need the variable. I guess I can put them in just to suppress the result set, but is there a better way to do it?

  • Coudl you maybe at least make it a FAST_FORWARD cursor to lessen the impact a cursor has?? – marc_s Dec 22 '10 at 16:18
  • FAST_FORWARD cursors are read-only. Not compatible with FOR UPDATE – BradC Dec 22 '10 at 16:21
  • @BradC, you say: "And yes, I do need a cursor, because each row's new value is actually based on a complicated calculation that depends on the prior rows." .... Since you were on SQL2k5, you had ranking functions which would almost certainly have been a better solution than the cursor. Even still, older versions of SQL Server had some useful tricks to avoid cursors. If you had posted your real problem, rather than the artificial one you inflicted on yourself, you might have got a much better answer. – Disillusioned Feb 14 '14 at 12:41
  • @BradC PS: Given your error: "maximum number of result sets that can be displayed in the results grid" ... surely the simplest solution was to set your query options to send Results to Text instead of Results to Grid? – Disillusioned Feb 14 '14 at 12:43
2

Note while begin ... end and Fetch into

Declare @row int
Declare @value int
DECLARE myCursor CURSOR FOR
        SELECT RowID, Value FROM myTable
        FOR UPDATE OF Value;
OPEN myCursor;
FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor into @row, @value
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> 1)
begin   
    UPDATE myTable SET Value = 42
    WHERE CURRENT OF myCursor
    FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor into @row, @value
END
CLOSE myCursor
DEALLOCATE myCursor
  • Guess that works. If I'm going to have the variable anyway, I might as well just change it to a FAST_FORWARD cursor and do UPDATE myTable SET Value = 42 WHERE RowID = @row. I guess then I don't really see the point of using a FOR UPDATE cursor. – BradC Dec 22 '10 at 16:51
  • Yes that's the way I do it too. Never used for update in production code – bernd_k Dec 22 '10 at 16:55

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