6

I'm storing a lot of complex data in tuples/lists, but would prefer to use small wrapper classes to make the data structures easier to understand, e.g.

class Person:
    def __init__(self, first, last):
        self.first = first
        self.last = last

p = Person('foo', 'bar')
print(p.last)
...

would be preferable over

p = ['foo', 'bar']
print(p[1])
...

however there seems to be a horrible memory overhead:

l = [Person('foo', 'bar') for i in range(10000000)]
# ipython now taks 1.7 GB RAM

and

del l
l = [('foo', 'bar') for i in range(10000000)]
# now just 118 MB RAM

Why? is there any obvious alternative solution that I didn't think of?

Thanks!

(I know, in this example the 'wrapper' class looks silly. But when the data becomes more complex and nested, it is more useful)

  • 2
    collections.namedtuple seem like they are made for this purpose, but they take around 1.1GB for your example. Not much better. – randomir Jul 15 '17 at 22:28
  • 1
    Looks into __slots__ or move to Python 3 for key-sharing dictionary. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 15 '17 at 22:39
  • 1
    In the case of tuples, I believe it just references the same tuple 10 million times. When you create an object, either class or a new tuple, it uses a lot more memory – Garr Godfrey Jul 15 '17 at 22:42
  • 1
    As indicated in the answers, your tuple example only creates a single tuple object. You should create a test case where you create a lot of different tuples vs custom objects and see how the performance is. – BrenBarn Jul 15 '17 at 22:42
  • try randomizing the values, you should get a different result. – Garr Godfrey Jul 15 '17 at 22:42
7

As others have said in their answers, you'll have to generate different objects for the comparison to make sense.

So, let's compare some approaches.

tuple

l = [(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]
# memory taken by Python3: 1.0 GB

class Person

class Person:
    def __init__(self, first, last):
        self.first = first
        self.last = last

l = [Person(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]
# memory: 2.0 GB

namedtuple (tuple + __slots__)

from collections import namedtuple
Person = namedtuple('Person', 'first last')

l = [Person(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]
# memory: 1.1 GB

namedtuple is basically a class that extends tuple and uses __slots__ for all named fields, but it adds fields getters and some other helper methods (you can see the exact code generated if called with verbose=True).

class Person + __slots__

class Person:
    __slots__ = ['first', 'last']
    def __init__(self, first, last):
        self.first = first
        self.last = last

l = [Person(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]
# memory: 0.9 GB

This is a trimmed-down version of namedtuple above. A clear winner, even better than pure tuples.

  • Thanks for the nice overview! I case anyone wonders how 2*10M integers can take up 1000M of memory, this seems to be due to the containing list + references: import numpy as np l = np.array([(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]) will only take 189MB (after taking 1GB for a short time during construction). This doesn't work with the class instances though (references?). – seb314 Jul 16 '17 at 12:06
  • Actually, np.array([(i, i) for i in range(10000000)]) will create a homogeneous 2-D array, 10000000x2, of dtype('int64'), meaning the size of such array is ~ 8 x N_elem bytes, or in this case ~160 MB. – randomir Jul 16 '17 at 14:24
6

The tuple literal in

[('foo', 'bar') for i in range(10000000)]

is a constant expression. The CPython peephole optimizer will evaluate it and reuse the resulting object in the code block. Thus [('foo', 'bar') for i in range(10000000)] creates a list of 10000000 references to the same tuple object:

>>> {*map(id, tuple_l)}
{140673197930568} # One unique memory address

Person('foo', 'bar') is not recognised as a constant expression, and therefore gets evaluated at every iteration, which results in 10000000 distinct objects being created:

>>> len({*map(id, class_l)})
10000000

This is the main reason for the the huge difference in memory footprint.

Pure-Python classes aren't very memory efficient, but you could add the __slots__ attribute to reduce the size of each instance:

class Person:
    __slots__ = ('first', 'last')
    ...

Adding __slots__ cut the memory footprint by about 60%.

  • that wouldn't be true for lists though right? (since they're mutable) – dabadaba Jul 15 '17 at 22:43
  • @dabadaba Only applicable to immutable things like tuple literal, frozenset, or any literal where constant folding can be applied etc. Though in checks on list literals are optimized to load them as constant: 4 in [1 , 2, 3] – Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 15 '17 at 22:52
  • @AshwiniChaudhary what's folding? I've only heard about that term in Scala. – dabadaba Jul 15 '17 at 23:07
  • @dabadaba Constant folding – vaultah Jul 15 '17 at 23:08
5

Using __slots__ decreases the memory footprint quite a bit (from 1.7 GB to 625 MB in my test), since each instance no longer needs to hold a dict to store the attributes.

class Person:
    __slots__ = ['first', 'last']
    def __init__(self, first, last):
        self.first = first
        self.last = last

The drawback is that you can no longer add attributes to an instance after it is created; the class only provides memory for the attributes listed in the __slots__ attribute.

  • I've corrected what I thought was a 'typo' in you answer, please rollback with my apologies if it wasn't. – Arnaud P Dec 18 '17 at 14:31
  • No, the correction was valid. It's the instance of Person to which you can no longer add new attributes. You probably can't added attributes to first or last, either, but for entirely different reasons :) – chepner Dec 18 '17 at 15:35
0

There is yet another way to reduce the amount of memory occupied by objects by turning off support for cyclic garbage collection in addition to turning off __dict__ and __weakref__. It is implemented in the library recordclass:

$ pip install recordclass

>>> import sys
>>> from recordclass import structclass
>>> Person = structclass('Person', 'first last')
>>> print(sys.getsizeof(Person(100,100)))
32

For __slot__ based class we have:

class Person:
    __slots__ = ['first', 'last']
    def __init__(self, first, last):
        self.first = first
        self.last = last

>>> print(sys.getsizeof(Person(100,100)))
56

As a result more saving of memory is possible.

-1

In your second example, you only create one object, because tuples are constants.

>>> l = [('foo', 'bar') for i in range(10000000)]
>>> id(l[0])
4330463176
>>> id(l[1])
4330463176

Classes have the overhead, that the attributes are saved in a dictionary. Therefore namedtuples needs only half the memory.

  • While it's true that tuples are constants, that doesn't explain the difference here. [tuple(['foo', 'bar']) for i in range(N)] creates N constant (but distinct) tuple objects. – vaultah Jul 15 '17 at 22:57
  • I didn't downvote, but the reason is not simply because "tuples are constant". It basically a CPython optimization that works on some kind of tuple literals, for example (1, 2 , 3/1) won't result in same ID in CPython 2, because 3/1 can't be constant folded in CPython 2. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 15 '17 at 22:59

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