1

This question already has an answer here:

My concern is with regards to something like:

for i in range(1000000000):
    ...

From a naive point of view, I assume that an array of 1000000000 integers is allocated and initialized before the loop begins, and deallocated only after the loop ends.

So I am wondering whether or not I should replace it with:

i = 0
while i < 1000000000:
    ...
    i += 1

But according to this answer, a for loop is executed faster than the equivalent while loop.

So do I have to settle for this kind of trade-off, or is my assumption above wrong, and there is no significant memory impact when iterating a large range?

marked as duplicate by khelwood, Jean-François Fabre python Jul 17 '17 at 12:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @mkrieger1: My question is "does range consume memory", not "what is the difference between range and xrange". So by definition, these two questions cannot be a duplicate. The two answers might be, so you can mark them duplicate instead. – goodvibration Jul 17 '17 at 12:23
  • @khelwood: My question is "does range consume memory", not "what is the difference between range and xrange". So by definition, these two questions cannot be a duplicate. The two answers might be, so you can mark them duplicate instead. – goodvibration Jul 17 '17 at 12:24
  • @Jean-François Fabre: My question is "does range consume memory", not "what is the difference between range and xrange". So by definition, these two questions cannot be a duplicate. The two answers might be, so you can mark them duplicate instead. – goodvibration Jul 17 '17 at 12:25
  • Clears Throat stackoverflow.com/questions/45129146/… – coldspeed Jul 17 '17 at 12:32
  • 1
    The irony of doing exact same comment three times. :D – Broman Jul 17 '17 at 12:45
5

Yes, in python-2.x range will create the whole list.

But you don't necessarily need a while loop you can also use the lazy-range-alternative: xrange.

for i in xrange(1000000000):
    ...
  • Great, thanks. But wouldn't that ultimately affect performance in the same way that a while loop does? – goodvibration Jul 17 '17 at 12:21
  • 1
    @goodvibration: Probably for i in xrange will be slightly faster than while, but difference will be small. In general for short lists, range will be faster than xrange but use more memory. It would only be noticeably be faster if you have a situation where you get to re-use the list a lot, because xrange will always generate elements on the fly, whilst you can re-use the list from range multiple times, it is just a list. At some point the memory use will get to the point that xrange is faster regardless. And for most purposes the difference is small either way, – Neil Slater Jul 17 '17 at 12:25
  • @goodvibration In my experience xrange will be faster than range and much faster than while for everything except short ranges. There range is a bit faster. – MSeifert Jul 17 '17 at 12:32
  • Thank you very much for the detailed explanation!!! – goodvibration Jul 17 '17 at 12:32
  • @goodvibration I created a gist with my timings, you can experiment with that yourself if you like :) – MSeifert Jul 17 '17 at 12:36

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