I want to have a function that prints out information about a member variable of a struct. In order to keep the function as simple (and error free) as possible I dont want to manually pass in the type as well. This causes me to need to be able to evaluate the arguments passed into my macro:

#ifndef preprocessor_stringify
#define preprocessor_stringify(s) #s
#endif

typedef struct test_s {
    void (*ptr)(void*);
} test;

void doSomething_(char *name, int offset, int size){
    printf("%s %d %d\n", name, offset, size);
}

#define doSomething(name, container) (\
    doSomething_(\
        preprocessor_stringify(name),\
        offsetof(container, name),\
        sizeof(container->name))\
    );

int main(){
    doSomething(ptr, test);
    return 0;
}

This yields a compile error of test.cpp:21:19: error: expected primary-expression before ‘->’ token sizeof(container->name))\

Any ideas on how to fix this? I would like the solution to be both c and c++ compatible, ideally.

  • I think it should be container::ptr because container is actually a type name, not a pointer. – VTT Jul 17 '17 at 15:48
  • 2
    @vtt: the question you link is about bitfields. How is that relevant? – rici Jul 17 '17 at 15:58
  • 1
    @vtt Where in the C++ post you reference supports " In C it is not really possible"? – chux Jul 17 '17 at 16:03
  • 1
    @VTT Since you can't apply sizeof to a bit-field at all, complaints about it not working are misguided. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 17 '17 at 16:17
  • 2
    @VTT: Every programmer is entitled to their aesthetic sensibilities, and arguably you cannot be a good programmer without them. However, if you program in C (or any real-world programming language), you will need to set them aside from time to time. At least, you need to be able to differentiate between constructs which don't appeal to you, and constructs which are not well-formed or otherwise have unpredictable effects. The NULL cast to get the size of a member is a perfectly legal and well-defined construct according to the language definition, so it certainly is possible. – rici Jul 17 '17 at 21:17
up vote 6 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stddef.h>

#ifndef preprocessor_stringify
#define preprocessor_stringify(s) #s
#endif

typedef struct test_s {
    void (*ptr)(void*);
} test;

void doSomething_(char const *name, int offset, int size){
    printf("%s %d %d\n", name, offset, size);
}

#define doSomething(name, container) (\
    doSomething_(\
        preprocessor_stringify(name),\
        offsetof(container, name),\
        sizeof(((container*)0)->name))\
    );

int main(){
    doSomething(ptr, test);
    return 0;
}

I have made two changes:

  1. In c++, string literals are const char[]

 

void doSomething_(char const *name, int offset, int size){
  1. We want the sizeof a model object, so we have to make a model:

 

sizeof(((container*)0)->name))\

One of the comments mentioned that the pointer conversion is ugly. I agree, let's confine it to one macro which we can re-use.

#define sizeof_member(Class, Member) sizeof ((Class*)0)->Member

#define doSomething(name, container) (\
    doSomething_(\
        preprocessor_stringify(name),\
        offsetof(container, name),\
        sizeof_member(container, name)) \
    );

Another alternative is to use temporary object.

#define doSomething(name, container)      \
    do {                                  \
        container temp;                   \
        doSomething_(                     \
            preprocessor_stringify(name), \
            offsetof(container, name),    \
            sizeof(temp.name)             \
        );                                \
    } while(0)

It's very likely that object is optimized away. (Might not apply to complex C++ objects).

  • This requires that the container has a default constructor. Also, the compiler doesn't have to optimize the object away. – Kevin Jul 17 '17 at 16:05
  • @Kevin True, but given OPs C compatibility requirement, constructor requirement should not be an issue. Also, optimization should be trivial to any half-smart compiler. – user694733 Jul 17 '17 at 16:07

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