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Do I necessarily need to specify D (e.g., 1.234D+00) at the end of all magic numbers (literal constants) if I've already declared everything double precision anyway?

  • what do you mean by magic njmber? example? – agentp Jul 18 '17 at 0:54
  • @agentp, please see link in edit. – Joel DeWitt Jul 18 '17 at 0:58
  • 2
    i guess you simply mean literal constants. The D is not strictly needed in case where you know the single precision representation is the same as the double. Integers for example. – agentp Jul 18 '17 at 1:11
8

Short answer: Yes, you do.

Long answer: By default, real literals are single precision unless otherwise specified. Assigning single precision literals to double precision variables incurs precision loss; that is, single precision literals are evaluated first as single precision then assigned to the higher-precision variable. I'm too lazy to retrieve the F2003 Handbook from the other room but I suspect that single-to-double assignment sets the low significance mantissa bits to zero. Either that or it's left up to the vendor.

Regardless, here's a demonstration of what happens when you mix precision between literals and variables (note that 0.1 can't be stored cleanly in binary floating point):

!> Demonstrate the effects of D and E suffixes on precision of literals
program whatkind
    use iso_fortran_env, only: output_unit, REAL32, REAL64
    implicit none

    real (kind=REAL64) :: dtest

10 format('Literal ', A, ' is of kind ', I2)
20 format(/, A)
30 format(/, 'Value stored in ', A, ' precision generated with ', A,    &
          ' precision literals:')
40 format('Literal is ', A)

    continue

    write(output_unit, 10) '1.0', kind(1.0)
    write(output_unit, 10) '1.0E0', kind(1.0E0)
    write(output_unit, 10) '1.0D0', kind(1.0D0)
    write(output_unit, 10) '1.0_REAL32', kind(1.0_REAL32)
    write(output_unit, 10) '1.0_REAL64', kind(1.0_REAL64)

    write(output_unit, 20) 'Raw tenths tests:'

    dtest = 0.1
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'single'
    write(output_unit, 40) '0.1'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 0.1D0
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'double'
    write(output_unit, 40) '0.1D0'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 1.0 / 10.0
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'single'
    write(output_unit, 40) '0.1'
    write(output_unit, 40) '1.0 / 10.0'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL64
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'double'
    write(output_unit, 40) '1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL64'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL32
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'single'
    write(output_unit, 40) '1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL32'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL32
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'mixed'
    write(output_unit, 40) '1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL32'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

    dtest = 1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL64
    write(output_unit, 30) 'double', 'mixed'
    write(output_unit, 40) '1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL64'
    write(output_unit, *) dtest

end program whatkind

The results of this are:

Literal 1.0 is of kind  4
Literal 1.0E0 is of kind  4
Literal 1.0D0 is of kind  8
Literal 1.0_REAL32 is of kind  4
Literal 1.0_REAL64 is of kind  8

Raw tenths tests:

Value stored in double precision generated with single precision literals:
Literal is 0.1
  0.10000000149011612     

Value stored in double precision generated with double precision literals:
Literal is 0.1D0
  0.10000000000000001     

Value stored in double precision generated with single precision literals:
Literal is 0.1
Literal is 1.0 / 10.0
  0.10000000149011612     

Value stored in double precision generated with double precision literals:
Literal is 1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL64
  0.10000000000000001     

Value stored in double precision generated with single precision literals:
Literal is 1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL32
  0.10000000149011612     

Value stored in double precision generated with mixed precision literals:
Literal is 1.0_REAL64 / 10.0_REAL32
  0.10000000000000001     

Value stored in double precision generated with mixed precision literals:
Literal is 1.0_REAL32 / 10.0_REAL64
  0.10000000000000001 

You see how in cases where all the literals are single precision (including those with no explicit precision set) there is low significance 'noise' stored in the double precision variable.

I find it interesting that operations on mixed precision literals seems to promote all the literals to higher precision before the operation is performed. Someone with more language-spec-fu might be able to explain that.

My advice: When in doubt, be explicit. It's safer and I think it's worth the extra keystrokes.

  • Great answer, thank you. Most compilers are good at catching instances of mixed precision, but I guess in this case it's left up to the programmer to make sure that all the Is are dotted and Ts are crossed. – Joel DeWitt Jul 19 '17 at 13:57
  • 1
    Also, I find myself sometimes casting a single precision literal using a KIND parameter, as in USE, INTRINSIC :: ISO_Fortran_env, dp=>REAL64, then 1.234_dp. It can be nicer to look at in some cases. – Joel DeWitt Jul 19 '17 at 17:12
  • My practice is to define a 'working precision' as WP = kind(1.0D0) but I like your method of aliasing WP to constants in ISO_Fortran_env better :) – arclight Jul 20 '17 at 3:12
  • A question on the _REAL32 notation: how do you combine this with scientific notation? What's the proper way to write 2.3D9_dbl or similar? – Jareth Holt Aug 7 '17 at 6:49
  • I'd write 2.3E9_db1 just because E is the default exponent character. Using D will probably work too, but I haven't checked if it does anything weird. – arclight Aug 9 '17 at 1:00

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