15

I'm currently trying to port some JavaScript over to PHP. However, I can't seem to find PHP's equivalent to the JavaScript array.every() function. I found PHP's each() function, but it doesn't seem to be exactly what I need.

3
  • 1
    plain ol' for loop, break out of it when the tested condition is false Jul 18 '17 at 2:50
  • 1
    Does every check if every element satisfies a predicate? Sometimes it's called all. Jul 18 '17 at 2:51
  • you say in a comment below that you are not very good with PHP, but if you are good with javascript, look at the Array#every polyfill code and convert that to PHP - perhaps? Jul 18 '17 at 3:07
9

Use a for loop with an early return.

PHP does not have a native function that performs the same function as Javascript's array#every.

0
5

Use foreach():

function allEven(array $values) 
{
    foreach ($values as $value) {
        if (1 === $value % 2) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

$data = [
    1,
    42,
    9000,
];

$allEven = allEven($data);

For reference, see:

Note foreach is better than using array_reduce() because evaluation will stop once a value has been found that doesn't satisfy the specification.

1
  • 1
    Pretty good answer because it (a) has a complete code example and (b) has early bailout but it could be improved to accept a callback instead of hardcoding the predicate. I'm not sure why you bother linking to array_reduce documentation--that function isn't appropriate for this purpose (as you state!) and you (correctly!) don't use it in your code.
    – ggorlen
    Apr 15 at 16:05
1

You can use array_reduce function.

3
  • 1
    I believe that is what I need. :) Jul 18 '17 at 2:59
  • 1
    This method is also designed to be destructive, altering your array values.
    – Bricky
    Jul 18 '17 at 3:04
  • 4
    array_reduce is fine (I use it plenty), but you should keep it in mind as your "when all else fails" function. It will scan your entire array every time, but Array#every should stop running as soon as on callback returns falsey. Jul 18 '17 at 3:17
1

Php array_every function


function array_every($array,$callback)
{

   return  !in_array(false,  array_map($callback,$array));
}


array_every([1,2,3],function($n){
     return $n>0;
});

4
  • 1
    I downvoted this answer because, even if it's a well-written solution, it doesn't work the same way as "every". "every" does early-return, when a falsy value was encountered (no further callbacks will be called). This one will all callbacks, regardless if it encountered a falsy value in one of them.
    – Torben
    Aug 6 '20 at 22:32
  • maybe t dont think performance ,I didn't think about it, just ı show how make it of course you are right ... Aug 7 '20 at 6:27
  • Note foreach is better than using array_reduce() because evaluation will stop once a value has been found that doesn't satisfy the specification. ABOVE NOTE Aug 7 '20 at 6:28
  • 1
    It's not only performance, if the function passed to every has side-effects, it will also trigger those side-effects, an actual every-function does not :)
    – Torben
    Aug 25 '20 at 13:15
1

Answers on this page are incomplete and change the semantics of every (JS) / all (Python) and similar functions from other languages. Mapping and reducing are incorrect because they visit every element regardless of their truth value.

We need something that supports a callback for an arbitrary predicate and features early bailout upon locating the first element that fails the predicate function. This answer comes close because it offers early bailout but fails to provide a callback predicate.

We might as well write some/any while we're at it.

<?php

function array_every(array $arr, callable $predicate) {
    foreach ($arr as $e) {
        if (!call_user_func($predicate, $e)) {
             return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

function array_any(array $arr, callable $predicate) {
    return !array_every($arr, function ($e) use ($predicate) {
        return !call_user_func($predicate, $e);
    });
}

// sample predicate
function is_even($e) {
    return $e % 2 === 0;
}

var_dump(array_every([0, 1, 2, 3], "is_even")); // => bool(false)
var_dump(array_every([0, 2], "is_even")); // => bool(true)
var_dump(array_any([1, 2], "is_even")); // => bool(true)
var_dump(array_any([1, 3], "is_even")); // => bool(false)
1

A simple solution:

function array_every(array $array, callable $fn) {
  return (bool)array_product(array_map($fn, $array));
}

Check it online: https://3v4l.org/1D1Ao

It is not optimized and is just a proof of concept. For production I would use a foreach to return false on the first item that does not pass the test.

-2

I wrote this protoype a LONG time ago, back in the dark age of the internet when you never knew what a the browser would do.

Yes, this predates jQuery by a decade.

It's in JS. Use it as a good exercise to learn PHP when you convert this.

A bit late for you but I hope it helps a bit.

  if ( typeof Array.prototype.every !== 'function' )
  {
  Array.every = Array.prototype.every = function( _callBack, _array )
  {
      // Assume failure
      var _matches = false;

      if ( typeof _callBack === 'function' )
      {
          // Use ARRAY Object data or passed in data
          _array = (_array === undefined) ? this : _array;

          // Assume success
          _matches = true;

          var _len = this.length;
          for ( var _i = 0; _i < _len; _i++ )
          {
              // If this failed, bounce out
              if ( ! _callBack(this[_i], _i, _array ) )
                  {
                  _matches = false;
                  break;
              }
          }
      }

      return _matches;
  };

}

-3

I think you can use :http://php.net/manual/ru/function.array-map.php.

array array_map ( callable $callback , array $array1 [, array $... ] )
5
  • I'll certainly look into that. Jul 18 '17 at 2:56
  • If used correctly, that would return an array of booleans which would need to be looped through again costing performance
    – ub3rst4r
    Jul 18 '17 at 2:57
  • map mutates your array. If you have an array $a = (1, 2, 3, 4) and you use map: $b = array_map("is_even", $a) Your original array is changed: //$a is now (False, True, False, True)
    – Bricky
    Jul 18 '17 at 2:59
  • 1
    @BrandonBrickyKerr that's the opposite of how array_map works. It's specifically for when you want to build a new array, not mutate your old one. Jul 18 '17 at 3:13
  • 1
    @BrandonBrickyKerr It doesn't modify the original array, it maps it to a new array. If you assign the same variable a new value, that's a different story.
    – localheinz
    Jul 18 '17 at 5:00

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