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My goal is to take an array of letters and cut it up into "n" parts. In this case no more than 10 letters each piece. But I want these arrays to be stored into an array reference which I can access on a counter.

For example, I have the following script to split an array of English alphabetical letters into 1 array of 10 letters. But since the English Alphabet has 26 letters, I need 2 more arrays to access in an array reference.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#split an array into parts. 
use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my @letters = ('A' .. 'Z');
say "These are my letters:";
for(@letters){print "$_  ";}

my @letters_selected = splice(@letters, 0, 10);
say "\nThese are my selected letters:";
for(@letters_selected){print "$_  ";}

The output is this: These are my letters:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

These are my selected letters:

A B C D E F G H I J

This little script only gives me one piece of 10 letters of the alphabet. But I want all three pieces of 10 letters of the alphabet, so I would like to know how I can achieve this:

Goal: Have an array reference called letters_selected of letters which contains all letters A - Z. But ... I can access all three pieces of size less than or equal to 10 letters like this.

  foreach(@{$letters_selected[0]}){say "$_  ";}

returns: A B C D E F G H I J # These are the initial 10 elements of the alphabet.

foreach(@{$letters_selected[1]}){say "$_  ";}

returns: K L M N O P Q R S T # The next 10 after that.

foreach(@{$letters_selected[2]}){say "$_  ";}

returns: U V W X Y Z # The next no more than 10 after that.

3

Since splice is destructive to its target you can keep applying it

use warnings;
use strict;

my @letters = 'A'..'Z';

my @letter_groups;

push @letter_groups, [ splice @letters, 0, 10 ]  while @letters;

print "@$_\n" for @letter_groups;

After this @letters is empty. So make a copy of it and work with that if you will need it.


Every time through, splice removes and returns elements from @letters and [ ] makes an anonymous array of that list. This reference is pushed on @letter_groups.

Since splice takes as many elements as there are (if there aren't 10) once fewer than 10 remain splice removes and returns that, the @letters gets emptied, and while terminates.

  • Wow! That's really clever, and simple. Thanks so much! Would you like to comment on the logic of your code? – xyz123 Jul 18 '17 at 5:49
  • @xyz123 Yes, right. The splice returns the first 10 chars, and @letters ends up shorter by that. The [ ... ] forms an anonymous array of that list, and that scalar is push-ed. This is in a while loop over @letters ... which will terminate once the @letters ends up empty. (The splice takes as many as there are, so we get that last batch for free :). I will add this to the answer in just a little while... – zdim Jul 18 '17 at 6:11
  • @xyz123 It's like while (@letters) { my @batch = splice $letters, 0, 10; push @letter_groups, \@batch }; (here we can avoid the data copy [@batch] since @batch gets re-created every time). Every time through @letters is shorter by 10 (the last time 6), and once it's empty the while is done. – zdim Jul 18 '17 at 6:14
  • OK, a downvote -- can someone give me any clue as to why ... ? I'd like to improve this post as much as possible but I just don't see what it is. – zdim Jul 18 '17 at 17:53
  • This post had a "characters" instead of "elements" for what's in the array -- wrong in principle of course (mislead by the fact that it is chars in this example), fixed. – zdim Jul 18 '17 at 17:56

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