40

I need to separate an integer into two numbers. Something like dividing by two but I only want integer components as a result, such as:

6 = 3 and 3
7 = 4 and 3

I tried the following, but I'm not sure its the best solution.

var number = 7;
var part1 = 0;
var part2 = 0;

if((number % 2) == 0) {
    part1 = number / 2;
    part2 = number / 2;
}
else {
    part1 = parseInt((number / 2) + 1);
    part2 = parseInt(number / 2);
}

This does what I want, but I don't think this code is clean.

Are there better ways of doing this?

4
  • 5
    See also Eric Lippert's guide to doing an integer division problem. It's a different problem, but you should probably take a similar approach to defining your requirements and only then writing code in such a way that it is obviously correct.
    – user65839
    Jul 18 '17 at 16:48
  • 8
    Never use parseInt when you actually mean Math.floor.
    – Bergi
    Jul 18 '17 at 21:02
  • @Mehrdad It's a mix of some factors: pure javascript tag questions are becoming incredibly simple (OP does zero research) or boring, the time of the day the question was posted, the mood of the people at that time... When I left a comment here it had just 6 upvotes, but in a short time span. Then, the question was listed in the "Hot network question". From that point on it was a snowball effect (or a positive feedback if you like). Jul 19 '17 at 12:55
  • 1
    Why can't it be 5,1 and 6,1 ?
    – Tom Taylor
    Jul 20 '17 at 18:38

10 Answers 10

107

Just find the first part and subtract it from the original number.

var x = 7;

var p1 = Math.floor(x / 2);
var p2 = x - p1;

console.log(p1, p2);

In the case of x being odd, p1 will receive the smaller of the two addends. You can switch this around by calling Math.ceil instead.

17
  • 8
    I think you want to use Math.floor or Math.ceil explicitly when want the first to be the smaller/larger one. round makes it ambiguous.
    – Bergi
    Jul 18 '17 at 21:03
  • 3
    @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ then use Math.ceil - which you don't even have to think about to know it will round up, and will still round up even if e.g. The divisor changes.
    – OrangeDog
    Jul 18 '17 at 22:07
  • 3
    And Math.ceil is shorter and therefore counts for more points if this were over on code golf. :)
    – DonielF
    Jul 19 '17 at 1:16
  • 4
    @georg It's definitely worth putting as an answer, but if OP wanted to deal in floats, 7 would become 3.5 3.5, not 4 3. What I'm saying is that's out of the scope of the question, and I'm not sure how beneficial it'd be to actually answer that and complicate the existing solution here than, say, make a new question.
    – cs95
    Jul 19 '17 at 10:05
  • 4
    @georg why do you insist on changing OP's expectations? Code in question doesn't work for floating point numbers too but OP is fine with it ("This does what I want")
    – barbsan
    May 18 '18 at 13:35
38
+100

Let javascript do Math for you.

var x = 7;
var p1 = Math.ceil(x / 2);
var p2 = Math.floor(x / 2);
console.log(p1, p2);

6
  • 1
    Just wondering : since Javascript only has floats and not integers, couldn't this method lead to different values for p1 and p2 even if x is even? Jul 18 '17 at 13:07
  • 7
    @EricDuminil /2 in IEEE floating point cannot cause a loss of precision or rounding in any integer that can be represented as a floating point prior to /2. It simply involves subtracting 1 from the exponent portion. Jul 18 '17 at 14:37
  • @Yakk: You can lose data for subnormal numbers, because /2 will shift the significant right by one bit instead of changing the exponent. However, subnormal numbers are smaller than one so they probably don't matter for this question (they are not integers).
    – Kevin
    Jul 18 '17 at 17:29
  • 1
    @Kevin Yes, quite. I said for "any integer that can be represented as a floating point" for a reason. Subnormal numbers are not representations of any integer as floating point numbers. Thus are not relevant to my comment (and, as you noted, not relevant to this question either). Jul 18 '17 at 17:32
  • 1
    FWIW, this gives 1 0 for x=1.5.
    – georg
    Jul 19 '17 at 9:57
8

Your code can be simplified a bit:

var num = 7;
var p1 = Math.floor(num / 2);
var p2 = p1;

if (num % 2 != 0) {
   p1++;
}
console.log(p1, p2);

8
  • 6
    If num is a number, and therefore num / 2 is also a number, why are you using parseInt (a function intended to convert a string to a number)? (I know why, but I think your answer would benefit massively from explaining why you've done it and what particular quirk of parseInt you're relying on to make it work.) Jul 18 '17 at 12:38
  • 3
    Honestly, var p2 = p1; is far less wasteful than calling parseInt twice.
    – cs95
    Jul 18 '17 at 17:30
  • 1
    Also, use parseInt only when you have a string. It does not work on numbers.
    – Bergi
    Jul 18 '17 at 21:06
  • @Bergi It works on numbers also. But the number will be first converted to a string and then parsed to get a integer. Check this: jibbering.com/faq/faq_notes/type_convert.html#tcParseIn
    – Abdul Rauf
    Jul 19 '17 at 5:16
  • @AnthonyGrist I was using parseInt just to convert float into a int. My answer does not rely on any other quirk of parseInt. I don't have much experience in JS as it is not my primary language. I have updated my answer now. Thanks.
    – Abdul Rauf
    Jul 19 '17 at 5:30
4

var num = 7;

var part1 = parseInt(num/2);
var part2 = num - part1;

console.log(part1, part2);

4

Another way to do this is using bitwise operators. It doesn't work for very big numbers

function splitter(number){
  part1 = (number>>1) + (number&1);
  part2 = number>>1;
  console.log(number + ":", part1 + "+" + part2);
}

splitter(7);
splitter(6);
splitter(2**30+1); // Breaks for values greater than 2**31
splitter(2**31+1); 

0
3

var x = 11;             
var a = Math.ceil(x/2);   
var b = x-a;             

console.log("x = " + x + " , a = " + a + " , b = " + b);

2

If in-case you don't want your outputs to be consecutive or exact identical and yet want to 'separate an integer into two numbers', this is the solution for you:

function printSeparatedInts(num) {
  let smallerNum = Math.floor(Math.random() * Math.floor(num));
  if (num && smallerNum === (num/2)) {    // checking if input != 0 & output is not consecutive
    printSeparatedInts(num)
   } else {
    console.log(smallerNum, (num - smallerNum))
  }
}

printSeparatedInts(22)
printSeparatedInts(22)     // will likely print different output from above
printSeparatedInts(7)

0
var number = 7;
var part1 = 0;
var part2 = 0;

if(number == 0) {
    part1 = (part2 = 0);
    console.log(part1, part2);
}
else if(number == 1) {
    part1 = 1;
    part2 = 0;
    console.log(part1, part2);
}
else if((number % 2) == 0) {
    part1 = part2 = number / 2;
    console.log(part1, part2);
}
else {
    part1 = (number + 1) / 2;
    part2 = number - part1;
    console.log(part1, part2);
}

Only other solution, I think performance is OK.

0

Feeling lazy ? No problem !

I proudly present to you a generator object !

Initialize it and just use it! It will automatically change value every other use, even in the same line!!

Usage: a = new splitter(n) then console.log(a+" and "+a)

function splitter(n){
    this.p1 = Math.floor(n/2);
    this.p2 = n-this.p1;
    this.cnt=0;
    this.valueOf= ()=> (++this.cnt%2)? this.p1:this.p2;
    return n;
}

a = new splitter(5);
console.log(a + " and " +a);
console.log(a + " and " +a);
console.log(a + " and " +a);

b = new splitter(11);
console.log(b + " and " +b);

-2

Or this way :)

var number = 7;
var part1 = ~~((number / 2) + (number % 2));
var part2 = ~~(number / 2);

console.log(part1, part2);

0

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