3

I am trying to call C++ functions from a dll using ctypes in python. My current issue is the function seems to return a large int, either positive or negative, instead of the char pointer I expect it to. If I convert that int to a c_char_p and call .value on it, it kills my kernel every single time. I've looked all over this site and in the docs too and can't figure this out. A lot of the things I have seen on this site even throw errors for me, like passing in strings to ctypes opjects and functions when they should be byte objects or something similar. Below is my c++ code that is turned into a dll and the python code I am using to call functions from the dll. Please if anyone can help me, that would be awesome. SaySomething is the function in question. Thanks.

TestLibrary.h

#pragma once

#ifdef TESTLIBRARY_EXPORTS
#define TESTLIBRARY_API __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define TESTLIBRARY_API __declspec(dllexport)
#endif

#include <windows.h>
#include <cstring>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"
{
#endif

    TESTLIBRARY_API char* SaySomething(const char* phrase);

#ifdef __cplusplus
};
#endif

TestLibrary.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "TestLibrary.h"
#include <iostream>

TESTLIBRARY_API char* SaySomething(const char* phrase)
{
    char* p = new char [100];
    p = "string something";
    return p;
}

tester2.py

import ctypes

dbl = ctypes.c_double
pChar = ctypes.c_char_p
pVoid = ctypes.c_void_p

libName = (r"D:\Documents\Coding Stuff\Visual Studio 2017\Projects\TestLibrary"
           r"Solution\x64\Debug\TestLibrary.dll")
x = ctypes.windll.LoadLibrary(libName)

x.SaySomething.argtypes = [pChar]
x.SaySomething.restypes = pChar

phrase = b"Hi"
phrase = pChar(phrase)

res = x.SaySomething(phrase)
  • 1
    A C function returns a single value with a single type. It's restype, not restypes. – Eryk Sun Jul 18 '17 at 22:34
  • 1
    Note also that in your c++ function, p = "string something"; probably won't do what you think. Surprisingly, the result will look like it works ;) – ddbug Jul 18 '17 at 22:53
  • @ddbug, until you try to modify it (e.g. set SaySomething.restype = ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_char) and then modify res[0] = b'x'). Most compilers put string-literal constants in memory that's mapped read-only, in which case the latter will crash Python. – Eryk Sun Jul 18 '17 at 23:12
  • 1
    Another unrelated problem is that the definition of TESTLIBRARY_API uses dllexport when TESTLIBRARY_EXPORTS isn't defined. It should be dllimport. This doesn't affect using the library via ctypes. It's a problem for C/C++ users of the library. – Eryk Sun Jul 18 '17 at 23:15
  • This is also a duplicate of the OP's previous question, with slightly different code: stackoverflow.com/q/45146021/235698, but can't mark it as a duplicate because the other has no answer yet either. – Mark Tolonen Jul 18 '17 at 23:31
5

While you can make an API that does what you are trying to do, you currently will have a memory leak. A better solution is to have Python allocate and manage the memory for the result.

I also fixed the dllimport as mentioned in the comments and defined TESTLIBRARY_EXPORTS in the .cpp file so the function would export from the DLL. restype was also fixed.

TesterLibrary.h

#pragma once

#ifdef TESTLIBRARY_EXPORTS
#define TESTLIBRARY_API __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define TESTLIBRARY_API __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#include <windows.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

TESTLIBRARY_API char* SaySomething(const char* phrase, char* result, size_t resultMaxLength);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

TesterLibrary.cpp

#define TESTLIBRARY_EXPORTS
#include "TestLibrary.h"
#include <stdio.h>

TESTLIBRARY_API char* SaySomething(const char* phrase, char* result, size_t resultMaxLength)
{
    _snprintf_s(result,resultMaxLength,_TRUNCATE,"Decorated <%s>",phrase);
    return result;
}

tester2.py

import ctypes

libName = (r"TestLibrary.dll")
x = ctypes.CDLL(libName)

x.SaySomething.argtypes = [ctypes.c_char_p,ctypes.c_char_p,ctypes.c_size_t]
x.SaySomething.restype = ctypes.c_char_p

phrase = b"Hi"
result = ctypes.create_string_buffer(100)
res = x.SaySomething(phrase,result,ctypes.sizeof(result))
print(res)
print(result.value)

Output

b'Decorated <Hi>'
b'Decorated <Hi>'

Python will automatically free the result buffer when there are no more references to it.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @ZachR, if you don't do it this way (which is the simplest and most reliable way), the result type has to change to a c_void_p that you cast, or a non-simple pointer type such as POINTER(c_char), or a subclass of c_char_p. Otherwise the getfunc of ctypes.c_char_p will copy the null-terminated string result to a new Python string object, and you'll have a memory leak. Another complication is that if the caller has to free memory allocated by the library, then a function for this has to be exported by the library. You can't assume the DLL and Python are using the same C runtime. – Eryk Sun Jul 19 '17 at 1:31
  • Mark, I will definitely try this. It looks pretty solid. I will get back to you guys on how it goes. @eryksun Like I mentioned in the above comments there is still a lot I do not know, so thank you for this. I was aware of the memory leak and wanted to get this working before I handled it. I will keep all this in mind when working on this. Thanks again. – ZachR Jul 19 '17 at 11:13
  • @Mark Tolonen Worked like a charm! Thanks. And thanks to everyone else too. – ZachR Jul 19 '17 at 22:46

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