I have created exactly the same demo scenarios (Landing on the website homepage) using Firefox and used Gatling and Jmeter to test the tools.

When I execute both of them (one by one) with 500 VU for 30 sec, I am getting huge difference between the response time (800 ms with Gatling and over 3000 ms with Jmeter) and JMeter is showing failures of over 29% while Gatling shows only 1%

Which one to trust?

As the application is still under development, Gatling seems to be unreliable as we are aware of response time is approx 2.5 seconds usually.

Don't trust any of them. My expectation is that with JMeter you recorded not only the main request(s) (Landing on the website homepage) but also a bunch of requests to so called "embedded resources" - images, scripts, styles, etc and Gatling doesn't record this form of requests.

This is quite important as normally these embedded resources are "heavier" than main response so you need to pay attention to this bit.

  1. Don't record calls to embedded resources. Real browsers download them in parallel (main request followed by concurrent calls to fetch them)
  2. Configure load testing tools to automatically fetch embedded resources.

  3. Don't forget about cache. Real browsers download these images, scripts and styles but do it only once, subsequent requests are not actually being made, the resources are being returned from browsers' caches.

See Web Testing with JMeter: How To Properly Handle Embedded Resources in HTML Responses for more details, the article is JMeter-oriented however the same recommendations are applicable to any load testing tool when it comes to web applications performance testing.

You seem to have already answered your own question as the response time from jMeter (3000ms) is close to your observed response time from your own resting (2500ms).

For each of your load providers (jmeter vs gatling), you should merge your load test logs along with logs from your web server and graph the response times from the load provider vs the web server.

Which ever graph has the closest values, that's the one I would accept.

  • Saturated load generator. Run a single virtual user for 500 samples of both to establish a baseline for a single user performance. You can back this up by taking a look at the w3c time taken fields in your HTTP logs. If consistent then you could very well be looking at a saturated load generator.
  • Test control elements. I am assuming you are using a single load generator for your test. Add a second control load generator to check against local issues on the host in the difference in resource cost between the two tools. On this control load generator include a single virtual user of each type you choose to run. If your control group and your non-control group degrade at the same rate then you have an application issue. If they degrade at different rates, i.e. the non control group is slower, then you have a load generator specific issue. You can also use the http w3c time-taken log fields tied to the control load generator and the non-control generator for a common request, such as foo.html, to check for differences in performance.
  • Apples to Tangelos. As noted earlier, are you certain that you are timing exactly the same thing. Flash your HTTP logs. Execute a single sample of each tool virtual user type. Dump your logs and compare tool one to tool two. Every tool on the market has a slightly different feel for how the browser is implemented for replay based upon the needs of the developers of the tool. It is worthwhile to understand these differences and how this impacts the collection and reporting of timing record data.
  • Ramp up. 500 users for 30 seconds suggests no ramp up. This is a poor test process issue and is the equivalent of taking a teetotaler and a bottle of vodka and combining in one swallow. You want to understand how resources are being allocated and the breakover point in the difference in response time - the knee in the curve. This would generally fail an audit for a load test by an outside party - no ramp up or ramp down.
  • Check for think time and pacing delays. If none are present then you generally would not be able to trust the results of either tool as virtual user would have collapsed the client-server model which expects delays between requests where the client is processing data, whether that is a software client or an organic client in the loop between screen and keyboard.

In response to @DmitriT point 1. and 2.

With gatling there is another way of downloading resources in a more controlled way: User the .resources() method, and list as many http("") requests as you want, they will all be executed in parallel. And to make it more realistic, combine it with HttpProtocolBuilder settings like : .maxConnectionsPerHostLikeChrome to be closer to reality. I use this approach since my resources might also have dynamic links got from previous requests, ex :

With gatling there is another way of downloading resources in a more controlled way:  User the **.resources()** method, and list as many http("") requests as you want, they will all be executed in parallel. And to make it more realistic, combine it with HttpProtocolBuilder settings like : **.maxConnectionsPerHostLikeChrome** to be closer to reality.    I use this approach since my resources might also have dynamic links got from previous requests, ex :  `tryMax(1) {
  group("<-- EMP : Login Page -->") {
    exec(
      http("EMP : Login Page - login.html ")
        .get("/admin-ng/login.html")
        .check(regex("/admin-ng/scripts/login.[^\"]*.js").find.saveAs("login_js"))
        .check(regex("/admin-ng/login.[^\"]*.css").find.saveAs("login_css"))
        .check(regex("/admin-ng/scripts/loginVendors.[^\"]*.js").find.saveAs("loginVendors_js"))
        .resources(
          http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 1 - login.xxx.css")
            .get(session => session("login_css").as[String])
            .check(regex("([^\\.]*?\\.woff2)").findAll.saveAs("listOfFontsWoff2"))
            .check(regex("([^\\.]*?\\.woff(?=[^2]))").findAll.saveAs("listOfFontsWoff")),
          http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 2 - login.xxx.js")
            .get(session => session("login_js").as[String]),
          http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 3 - loginVendors.xxx.js")
            .get(session => session("loginVendors_js").as[String])
        )
    )
      .exec(
        http("")
          .get("")
          .silent
          .resources(
            http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 4 - .min.js")
              .get("/nr-spa-974.min.js"),
            http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 5 - woff2 (index: 3)")
              .get(session => session("listOfFontsWoff2").as[Seq[String]].apply(3)),
            http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 6 - woff2 (index: 2)")
              .get(session => session("listOfFontsWoff2").as[Seq[String]].apply(2)),
            http("EMP : Login Page => Asset 7 - woff2 (index: 5)")
              .get(session => session("listOfFontsWoff2").as[Seq[String]].apply(5))
          )
      )
  }
}`

This code executes in 2 phases same as in the browser:

  1. The main link to the webpage, which contains some link to the JS and CSS resources, i extract them, and in a .resources() method download them in parallel.
  2. Then the next phase i download the resources that are extracted from the previous resources, in this case from login_css

This way i get pretty close timings to the real browser (ofc it's never 100% accurate, regardless of the tool, every one of them will lack something in a particular area which you will face eventually)

And remember to use in Gatling the group() method, as it will count all the requests and resource parallel requests under it as one entity (like a web page loading from a to z) with the option in the report to see sub-requests of the group separately if needed

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