39

Suppose that I want to create a compile time constructed bit count lookup table for 64bit integers in 16 bit chunks. The only way I know to do this is the following code:

#define B4(n) n, n + 1, n + 1, n + 2
#define B6(n)   B4(n),   B4(n + 1),   B4(n + 1),  B4(n + 2)  
#define B8(n)   B6(n),   B6(n + 1),   B6(n + 1),  B6(n + 2)
#define B10(n)  B8(n),   B8(n + 1),   B8(n + 1),  B8(n + 2)
#define B12(n)  B10(n),  B10(n + 1),  B10(n + 1), B10(n + 2)
#define B14(n)  B12(n),  B12(n + 1),  B12(n + 1), B12(n + 2)
#define B16(n)  B14(n),  B14(n + 1),  B14(n + 1), B14(n + 2)
#define COUNT_BITS B16(0), B16(1), B16(1), B16(2)

unsigned int lookup[65536] = { COUNT_BITS };

Is there a modern (C++11/14) way to obtain the same result?

13
  • 20
    you don't have enough memory for a 64-bit lookup table
    – phuclv
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 11:14
  • 6
    @Lưu Vĩnh Phúc I mean, one can compute bit count for 64bit integers in dividing them in 16bit chunks and summing up the results. This is a trick that makes you save space complexity
    – fitzbutz
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 11:17
  • 8
    @LưuVĩnhPhúc: Read the question again. The lookup table size is 65536. A number will be processed in 16-bit chunks. No one talks about 64-bit lookup table here.
    – geza
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 11:33
  • 9
    Do you really need a lookup table? Or a fast routine will be enough? In the latter case see the question How to count the number of set bits in a 32-bit integer? and the answer by Matt Howells.
    – CiaPan
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 13:10
  • 10
    For what it's worth, x86 compilers that implement __builtin_popcount will emit a popcnt instruction if the target processor supports it, or they will fall back to the fast parallel bit-counting algorithm presented by Matt Howells in the answers that @CiaPan linked. So there is never really a reason to code that algorithm yourself, unless you're on a compiler that doesn't have a built-in for population count. Clearly this same optimization is applied to std::bitset.count, at least in the compiler Richard Hodges tested with. Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 13:56

4 Answers 4

86

Why not use the standard library?

#include <bitset>

int bits_in(std::uint64_t u)
{
    auto bs = std::bitset<64>(u);
    return bs.count();
}

resulting assembler (Compiled with -O2 -march=native):

bits_in(unsigned long):
        xor     eax, eax
        popcnt  rax, rdi
        ret

It is worth mentioning at this point that not all x86 processors have this instruction so (at least with gcc) you will need to let it know what architecture to compile for.

@tambre mentioned that in reality, when it can, the optimiser will go further:

volatile int results[3];

int main()
{
    results[0] = bits_in(255);
    results[1] = bits_in(1023);
    results[2] = bits_in(0x8000800080008000);   
}

resulting assembler:

main:
        mov     DWORD PTR results[rip], 8
        xor     eax, eax
        mov     DWORD PTR results[rip+4], 10
        mov     DWORD PTR results[rip+8], 4
        ret

Old-school bit-twiddlers like me need to find new problems to solve :)

Update

Not everyone was happy that the solution relies on cpu help to compute the bitcount. So what if we used an autogenerated table but allowed the developer to configure the size of it? (warning - long compile time for the 16-bit table version)

#include <utility>
#include <cstdint>
#include <array>
#include <numeric>
#include <bitset>


template<std::size_t word_size, std::size_t...Is>
constexpr auto generate(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, word_size>, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
    struct popcount_type {
        constexpr auto operator()(int i) const {
            int bits = 0;
            while (i) {
                i &= i - 1;
                ++bits;
            }
            return bits;
        }
    };
    constexpr auto popcnt = popcount_type();

    return std::array<int, sizeof...(Is)>
            {
                    {popcnt(Is)...}
            };
}

template<class T>
constexpr auto power2(T x) {
    T result = 1;
    for (T i = 0; i < x; ++i)
        result *= 2;
    return result;
}


template<class TableWord>
struct table {
    static constexpr auto word_size = std::numeric_limits<TableWord>::digits;
    static constexpr auto table_length = power2(word_size);
    using array_type = std::array<int, table_length>;
    static const array_type& get_data() {
        static const array_type data = generate(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, word_size>(),
                                           std::make_index_sequence<table_length>());
        return data;
    };

};

template<class Word>
struct use_table_word {
};

template<class Word, class TableWord = std::uint8_t>
int bits_in(Word val, use_table_word<TableWord> = use_table_word<TableWord>()) {
    constexpr auto table_word_size = std::numeric_limits<TableWord>::digits;

    constexpr auto word_size = std::numeric_limits<Word>::digits;
    constexpr auto times = word_size / table_word_size;
    static_assert(times > 0, "incompatible");

    auto reduce = [val](auto times) {
        return (val >> (table_word_size * times)) & (power2(table_word_size) - 1);
    };

    auto const& data = table<TableWord>::get_data();
    auto result = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < times; ++i) {
        result += data[reduce(i)];
    }
    return result;
}

volatile int results[3];

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    auto input = std::uint64_t(1023);
    results[0] = bits_in(input);
    results[0] = bits_in(input, use_table_word<std::uint16_t>());

    results[1] = bits_in(0x8000800080008000);
    results[2] = bits_in(34567890);

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        std::cout << results[i] << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Final Update

This version allows the use of any number of bits in the lookup table and supports any input type, even if it's smaller than the number of bits in the lookup table.

It also short-circuits if the high bits are zero.

#include <utility>
#include <cstdint>
#include <array>
#include <numeric>
#include <algorithm>

namespace detail {
    template<std::size_t bits, typename = void>
    struct smallest_word;

    template<std::size_t bits>
    struct smallest_word<bits, std::enable_if_t<(bits <= 8)>>
    {
        using type = std::uint8_t;
    };

    template<std::size_t bits>
    struct smallest_word<bits, std::enable_if_t<(bits > 8 and bits <= 16)>>
    {
        using type = std::uint16_t;
    };

    template<std::size_t bits>
    struct smallest_word<bits, std::enable_if_t<(bits > 16 and bits <= 32)>>
    {
        using type = std::uint32_t;
    };

    template<std::size_t bits>
    struct smallest_word<bits, std::enable_if_t<(bits > 32 and bits <= 64)>>
    {
        using type = std::uint64_t;
    };
}

template<std::size_t bits> using smallest_word = typename detail::smallest_word<bits>::type;

template<class WordType, std::size_t bits, std::size_t...Is>
constexpr auto generate(std::index_sequence<Is...>) {

    using word_type = WordType;

    struct popcount_type {
        constexpr auto operator()(word_type i) const {
            int result = 0;
            while (i) {
                i &= i - 1;
                ++result;
            }
            return result;
        }
    };
    constexpr auto popcnt = popcount_type();

    return std::array<word_type, sizeof...(Is)>
            {
                    {popcnt(Is)...}
            };
}

template<class T>
constexpr auto power2(T x) {
    return T(1) << x;
}

template<std::size_t word_size>
struct table {

    static constexpr auto table_length = power2(word_size);

    using word_type = smallest_word<word_size>;

    using array_type = std::array<word_type, table_length>;

    static const array_type& get_data() {
        static const array_type data = generate<word_type, word_size>(std::make_index_sequence<table_length>());
        return data;
    };

    template<class Type, std::size_t bits>
    static constexpr auto n_bits() {
        auto result = Type();
        auto b = bits;
        while(b--) {
            result = (result << 1) | Type(1);
        }
        return result;
    };

    template<class Uint>
    int operator()(Uint i) const {
        constexpr auto mask = n_bits<Uint, word_size>();
        return get_data()[i & mask];
    }

};

template<int bits>
struct use_bits {
    static constexpr auto digits = bits;
};

template<class T>
constexpr auto minimum(T x, T y) { return x < y ? x : y; }

template<class Word, class UseBits = use_bits<8>>
int bits_in(Word val, UseBits = UseBits()) {

    using word_type = std::make_unsigned_t<Word>;
    auto uval = static_cast<word_type>(val);


    constexpr auto table_word_size = UseBits::digits;
    constexpr auto word_size = std::numeric_limits<word_type>::digits;

    auto const& mytable = table<table_word_size>();
    int result = 0;
    while (uval)
    {
        result += mytable(uval);
#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wshift-count-overflow"
                uval >>= minimum(table_word_size, word_size);
#pragma clang diagnostic pop
    }

    return result;
}

volatile int results[4];

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    auto input = std::uint8_t(127);
    results[0] = bits_in(input);
    results[1] = bits_in(input, use_bits<4>());
    results[2] = bits_in(input, use_bits<11>());
    results[3] = bits_in(input, use_bits<15>());

    for (auto&& i : results) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    auto input2 = 0xabcdef;
    results[0] = bits_in(input2);
    results[1] = bits_in(input2, use_bits<4>());
    results[2] = bits_in(input2, use_bits<11>());
    results[3] = bits_in(input2, use_bits<15>());

    for (auto&& i : results) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    auto input3 = -1;
    results[0] = bits_in(input3);
    results[1] = bits_in(input3, use_bits<4>());
    results[2] = bits_in(input3, use_bits<11>());
    results[3] = bits_in(input3, use_bits<15>());

    for (auto&& i : results) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

example output:

7
7
7
7
17
17
17
17
32
32
32
32

The resulting assembly output for a call to bits_in(int, use_bits<11>()) for example, becomes:

.L16:
        mov     edx, edi
        and     edx, 2047
        movzx   edx, WORD PTR table<11ul>::get_data()::data[rdx+rdx]
        add     eax, edx
        shr     edi, 11
        jne     .L16

Which seems reasonable to me.

27
  • 3
    It is much better as it saved lots of CPU cycle and L2 cache
    – Dennis C
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 12:06
  • 3
    It's stunning the optimizer is able to figure out bits_in is nothing but return __builtin_popcountll(u) but, not only, can even compute that at compile time. That's why intrinsics are su much better over inline asm, when possible. NB: bitset::count returns size_t.
    – edmz
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 12:47
  • 4
    This was the question: "Suppose that I want to create a compile time constructed bit count lookup table for 64bit integers in 16 bit chunks". This is not an answer to this question. You can mention this solution as an alternative, but it is not an answer. Too bad that this answer is the most upvoted one,
    – geza
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 13:34
  • 30
    @geza: StackOverflow favors solving the problem over answering the question as asked, notably because many questions suffers from the X/Y problems. It's more likely that the OP is trying to find a fast way to count the bits, rather than being deadset on using a 16-bits table method (and why 16-bits and not 8-bits?). If the OP were to clarify they absolutely want to use a table, even if it's slower, then it would be different... and a rather surprising question. Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 15:27
  • 8
    @geza the question clearly asks “Is there a modern (C++11/14) way to obtain the same result?” and that has been answered here. Even if the target CPU hasn’t a popcnt instruction, it is reasonable to assume the the “modern” compiler will optimize the std::bitset approach to something that is at least on par with the lookup table approach. Most notably, because the compiler already knows, which of these alternatives is the best for the particular target platform…
    – Holger
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 17:51
22

This is a C++14 solution, built basically around the usage of constexpr:

// this struct is a primitive replacement of the std::array that 
// has no 'constexpr reference operator[]' in C++14 
template<int N>
struct lookup_table {
    int table[N];

    constexpr int& operator[](size_t i) { return table[i]; }
    constexpr const int& operator[](size_t i) const { return table[i]; }
};

constexpr int bit_count(int i) { 
    int bits = 0; 
    while (i) { i &= i-1; ++bits; } 
    return bits;
}

template<int N> 
constexpr lookup_table<N> generate() {
    lookup_table<N> table = {};

    for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        table[i] = bit_count(i);

    return table;
}

template<int I> struct Check {
    Check() { std::cout <<  I << "\n"; }
};

constexpr auto table = generate<65536>();

int main() {
    // checks that they are evaluated at compile-time 
    Check<table[5]>();
    Check<table[65535]>();
    return 0;
}

Runnable version: http://ideone.com/zQB86O

2
  • Is there any particular reason as to why, in the const operator[] overload, the primitive (constexpr) return type is by reference rather than by value? I believe overloading the array subscript operator generally recommends value return for the const variant in case the return is a primitive(/built-in) type, but I'm not well-versed with constexpr in contexts such as this one. Nice answer!
    – dfrib
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 18:04
  • @dfri, thanks! No, there was no particular reason, it was a 'copy' of the std::array generic operator and I believe could be changed to a value return.
    – DAle
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 18:42
20

With you can use constexpr to construct the lookup table in compile time. With population count calculation the lookup table can be contructed as follows:

#include <array>
#include <cstdint>

template<std::size_t N>
constexpr std::array<std::uint16_t, N> make_lookup() {
    std::array<std::uint16_t, N> table {};

    for(std::size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        std::uint16_t popcnt = i;

        popcnt = popcnt - ((popcnt >> 1) & 0x5555);
        popcnt = (popcnt & 0x3333) + ((popcnt >> 2) & 0x3333);
        popcnt = ((popcnt + (popcnt >> 4)) & 0x0F0F) * 0x0101;

        table[i] = popcnt >> 8;
    }
    return table;
}

Sample usage:

auto lookup = make_lookup<65536>();

The std::array::operator[] is constexpr since , with the example above compiles but won't be a true constexpr.


If you like to punish your compiler, you can initialize the resulting std::array with variadic templates too. This version will work with too and even with by using the indices trick.

#include <array>
#include <cstdint>
#include <utility>

namespace detail {
constexpr std::uint8_t popcnt_8(std::uint8_t i) {
    i = i - ((i >> 1) & 0x55);
    i = (i & 0x33) + ((i >> 2) & 0x33);
    return ((i + (i >> 4)) & 0x0F);
}

template<std::size_t... I>
constexpr std::array<std::uint8_t, sizeof...(I)>
make_lookup_impl(std::index_sequence<I...>) {
    return { popcnt_8(I)... };
}
} /* detail */

template<std::size_t N>
constexpr decltype(auto) make_lookup() {
    return detail::make_lookup_impl(std::make_index_sequence<N>{});
}

Note: In the example above I switched to the 8-bit integers from 16-bit integers.

Assembly Output

The 8-bit version will make only 256 template arguments for detail::make_lookup_impl function instead of 65536. The latter is too much and will exceed the template instantiation depth maximum. If you have more than enough virtual memory, you can increase this maximum with -ftemplate-depth=65536 compiler flag on GCC and switch back to 16-bit integers.

Anyway, take a look into the following demo and try it how the 8-bit version counts the set bits of a 64-bit integer.

Live Demo

7
  • 2
    In C++14 std::array::operator[] is not constexpr, and it seems this code will be evaluated at a compile-time only in C++17. That's why I did not use std::array in my example.
    – DAle
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 13:23
  • 2
    @DAle, yes, you are right. I edited my answer accordingly.
    – Akira
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 14:04
  • You can get this to work in c++14 by making table a C array, implementing c++17's std::to_array, and returning to_array(table).
    – Erroneous
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 19:04
  • @Erroneous, it's a good idea but unfortunately in this case it will produce a lot of template arguments (namely 65536) and it will exceed the template instantiation depth maximum. This maximum can be increased with -ftemplate-depth=65536 compiler flag but it has a serious negative impact on compilation time.
    – Akira
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 20:23
  • @Akira I didn't get any issues on gcc 7.1.1. I used the implementation from en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/experimental/to_array and compiled with -std=c++14 -ftemplate-depth=256.
    – Erroneous
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 20:34
2

One more for posterity, creating a lookup table using a recursive solution (of log(N) depth). It makes use of constexpr-if and constexpr-array-operator[], so it's very much C++17.

#include <array>

template<size_t Target, size_t I = 1>
constexpr auto make_table (std::array<int, I> in = {{ 0 }})
{
  if constexpr (I >= Target)
  {
    return in;
  }
  else
  {
    std::array<int, I * 2> out {{}};
    for (size_t i = 0; i != I; ++i)
    {
      out[i] = in[i];
      out[I + i] = in[i] + 1;
    }
    return make_table<Target> (out);
  }
}

constexpr auto population = make_table<65536> ();

See it compile here: https://godbolt.org/g/RJG1JA

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