1

I find myself wanting to do the same thing multiple times, something I can write easily enough with a for loop, but I find myself wondering if there is an existing method that does it easier I should be utilizing.

I essentially want something like find() which will run a method on every element of an array looking for one I care about. But when I find the value I want the method to return whatever value I generate.

To give an example I mostly want a method like this for error checking values. Imagine I have some function foo that iterates over the array until I return something, then exits with that returned value. I could use it for error checking a large array doing something like this...

const errorMessage = myArray.foo( (element) => {
   if ( element.value < minValue ) {
      return `{element.name} is less than {minValue}`;
   }
   if ( element.value > maxValue ) {
      return `{element.name} is greater than {maxValue}`;
   }

   // insert other error checks
})

if (errorMessage)
    Alerts.sendError(errorMessage);
else 
   // whatever I'd do if no error happened

I can write this myself, but is there an already existing method that does the equivalent, either in raw JS or in one of the common support libraries like underscore.js?

  • What about Array.reduce? – Pablo Lozano Jul 19 '17 at 13:26
  • Do you want only one result or multiple results? Do you want to return a custom response for each object? – cнŝdk Jul 19 '17 at 13:34
  • @chsdk a single value. I want to stop processing as soon as I find one relevant value – dsollen Jul 19 '17 at 14:01
  • @chsdk yes, but I'd rather just write an old fashioned for loop at that point. If there isn't an existing function that does it, which I had thought plausible but due to the lack of a response I suppose is not the case, then it's cleaner to do it with a for loop and break statement which is the most self-documenting. – dsollen Jul 20 '17 at 11:41
1

Yes, there is Array.prototype.some function.

Your code should look like this:

var error = null;
const checkElementValue = function(element) {
    if (element < minValue) {
        error = `{element.name} is less than {minValue}`;
    }
    if (element.value > maxValue) {
        error = `{element.name} is greater than {maxValue}`;
    }
    return (error !== null)
    // insert other error checks
};

if (yourArray.some(checkElementValue)) {
    console.log(error);
}
  • 1
    I don't think that does what I asked in the question. it doesn't allow me to return a calculated value from my function if I find a value. – dsollen Jul 19 '17 at 14:00
  • 1
    For sure, the function can return true or false. However, it can have side effects, so in your case, the error message can be assigned to a variable which was defined in the parent scope (e.g. you can define errorMsg variable in the global scope and use it in the errorMessage function before returning true or false). – mgajic Jul 19 '17 at 14:23
  • I've just edited my answer, so you can see exactly what I mean. – mgajic Jul 19 '17 at 14:30
  • ahh, I better understand now. Yes this would work, though I wish there was a more explicit method, just for self-documenting code reasons. This approach doesn't advertise that it's utilizing side effects and thus risks being confusing to someone new reading the code. Still, I'll accept it if no better option is proposed. – dsollen Jul 19 '17 at 14:34
  • OK, thanks. In order to to make the code self-documented, maybe you should wrap up the functionality I wrote above into a well-named function (e.g. getErrorMessage), which would return the error message (like in your example). – mgajic Jul 19 '17 at 17:14
1

If you want to return a custom response if a single value matches your condition, you can't do it by just calling any Array built-in methods.

All the methods (find(), filter(), some()) will return either a boolean or the relevant value.

I think you will need to combine two or more methods to get what you want, for example you can combine find(), map() and shift() methods like this:

var result = [myArray.find(function(el) {
  return el.value < minValue;
})].map(function(element) {
  return element.name + ' value is less than ' + minValue;
}).shift();

Explanation:

  • .find() method will return the relative object, you just need to put it into an array.
  • Then you can call .map() method over this array, so you can return your custom response.
  • And finally use .shift() to get back the response string from your array.

Demo:

var myArray = [{
    value: 50,
    name: 'john'
  },
  {
    value: 11,
    name: 'Allen'
  },
  {
    value: 5,
    name: 'joe'
  }
];

var minValue = 10;

var result = [myArray.find(function(el) {
  return el.value < minValue;
})].map(function(element) {
  return element.name + ' value is less than ' + minValue;
}).shift();
console.log(result);

0
async.forEach(myArray, function (element, callback) {
    if (yourFunction(element) > yourCriteria) { //Whatever case you want to check
        callback(whateverYouWant(element)); //exits after this.
    } else {
        callback();
    }
}, function (data) {
    if (data) {
      // Data contains what you want to do.
    } else {
      //There is no problem with array.
    }
});
0

From Underscore.js docs:

find _.find(list, predicate, [context]) Alias: detect

Looks through each value in the list, returning the first one that passes a truth test (predicate), or undefined if no value passes the test. The function returns as soon as it finds an acceptable element, and doesn't traverse the entire list.

  • I don't think this meets my request? As far as I can tell it doesn't allow me to return a special value I generated when inspecting the element? – dsollen Jul 19 '17 at 14:04
0

I stumbled upon a method that works for my usual usecase relatively well.

The for...of syntax of the newer ECMAScript 2015 works pretty well for this. The new syntax is just about as clean as a forEach loop, in my mind, and since it's not a function I can simply return when I find the value I want.

Since good coding practice would usually have me wrapping error checking or most other logic like this within a helper function, just to be better self-documenting, It's usually safe for me to simply return when I find the value i want. Yes it's not what I said I was looking for, but it serves the intent motiviating the question cleanly, so I wanted to at least document it for others.

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