1

XML:

<data_format>
    <data_length>15</data_length> <!-- -1 for unknown -->
    <start_charater>$</start_charater>
    <end_character1>B</end_character1>
    <end_character2>E</end_character2>
    <no_of_parameter>2</no_of_parameter>
    <parameter>
        <start_charater>A</start_charater>
        <data_name>Azimuth</data_name>
        <data_type>char</data_type>
        <size>5</size>
    </parameter>
    <parameter>
        <start_charater>R</start_charater>
        <data_name>Range</data_name>
        <data_type>char</data_type>
        <size>5</size>
    </parameter>
</data_format>

How should I convert this information encoded in XML into a class which can contain this structure? I need this to be done at runtime. I am getting the data for Azimuth and Range from a packet received through some port and need a structure to hold that data which I don't want to hard code but want to produce it at runtime when in parse that XML. the purpose for doing this is to increase the generic nature of my application.

Example :

<!-- for this xml -->
  <data>
    <data_member name="name" type="String"></data_member>
    <data_member name="id" type="int"></data_member>
  </data>

And the Java class that i want is:

class Data
  {
     private String name;
     private int id;
     public String getName()
      {
        return name;
      }
      public void setName(name)
      {
        this.name=name;
      }
      public int getId()
      {
        return id;
      }
      public void setId(id)
      {
        this.id=id;
      }
}
  • 1
    Can you add a class definition you want to be created dynamically? But I'm afraid you cannot say something like "I want new class DataHolder extending Object with fields a, b and c" created dynamically. Please specify better what you want to achieve... – Betlista Jul 19 '17 at 14:43
  • 1
    Found this but not sure how it helps. How would the rest of your code know how to call the methods of this dynamically generated class? Please add more context and describe the use case in detail. – Andrew S Jul 19 '17 at 15:00
  • 1
    I think you are off to the wrong direction here. You are asking for something which is very difficult and not very useful. And it's still not clear how you will know the name of the getter and setter you will need to access. If you somehow know the names in the XML, you may well use a Map of some sort. Why do you need a class? – RealSkeptic Jul 19 '17 at 15:21
  • 1
    This sounds a lot like an XY problem. Now that we know you want to change some parts of the XML document, we can address that question. Most likely, you want to simply navigate the XML Document, or, if the XML is very large, use XSLT to transform it. – VGR Jul 19 '17 at 15:57
  • 1
    Even if you use reflection, how will you know which methods to call? How will you know what data the get-methods return, or what data to pass to a set-method? I think your design is flawed. You cannot reasonably tell people “send anything you want and I’ll figure it out.” You need to define a specific structure and you need to require others to adhere to it. This is why public methods exist. And it’s why XML schemas exist. Without a well-defined contract for communication, you will have unreliable, unrobust guesswork at best. – VGR Jul 19 '17 at 16:42
3

Save yourself a headache: create your POJOs manually, and use JAXB to process relevant XML files into your POJO instances. See this question for an example and a reference link.

0

Let's start with second XML example, which is btw a lot different to a first one...

Here it is again (in case of edit, I added values to XML):

<data>
    <data_member name="name" type="String">foo</data_member>
    <data_member name="id" type="int">42</data_member>
</data>

As RealSkeptic mentioned in a comment, you can use Maps:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class DataHolder {

    private Map<String, Integer> ints = new HashMap<>();
    private Map<String, String> strings = new HashMap<>();

    public int getInt(String fieldName) {
        return ints.get(fieldName);
    }

    public void setInt(String fieldName, int value) {
        ints.put(fieldName, value);
    }

    public String getString(String fieldName) {
        return strings.get(fieldName);
    }

    public void setString(String fieldName, String value) {
        strings.put(fieldName, value);
    }

}

I'd strongly recommend to use only some well known types: primitives + String seems reasonable for a start. Do not use Object's, that's always painful to work with that, at some point I need to cast it to something specific.

But still if I'm the user of your API, I'd create wrapper class to work with it in more convenient way:

public class DataHolderNameAndIdWrapper {

    private DataHolder dataHolder;

    public void setDataHolder(DataHolder dataHolder) {
        this.dataHolder = dataHolder;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return dataHolder.getString("name");
    }
    public void setName(String name) {
        dataHolder.setString("name", name);
    }
    public Integer getId() {
        return dataHolder.getInt("id");
    }
    public void setId(Integer id) {
        dataHolder.setInt("id", id);
    }

}

Because me as a consumer I want to know what am I working with and I personally do not agree with your comment "people can create an XML for the same which is easier than coding", as you see, discussion is longer, then proper implementation...

There are still some questions

  • Do you want the names to be case sensitive?
  • What will happen if it is not set?

While java is case sensitive, for usage above I'd convert field names to lowercase. Maps will return nulls if not there. I'd again return empty string "" or 0.

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