2

I would like to concatenate two dictionaries with a += operator overload using the method below.

static func += <Key, Value> ( left: inout [Key : Value], right: [Key : Value]) {
    for (key, value) in right {
        left.updateValue(value, forKey: key)
    }
}

OR

static func +=<Key, Value>( left: inout Dictionary<Key ,Value>, right: Dictionary<Key, Value>) {
    for (key, value) in right {
        left.updateValue(value, forKey: key)
    }
}

With this implementation:

var properties = ["Key": "Value"]
var newProperties = ["NewKey": "NewValue"]
properties += newProperties

I get below error from xCode,

Cannot convert value of type '[String: Any]' to expected argument type 'inout [_ : ]' (aka 'inout'Dictionary<, _>)

It doesn't work, can anyone can help me or if it's not possible, explain me why?

  • 1
    Note that your code as posted above compiles without problems. It is always a good idea to create a new project with a minimal reproducible example in order to avoid unclear problem statements. – Martin R Jul 19 '17 at 18:54
  • @MartinR Technically it won't compile at the top-level with the functions being declared as static, but yeah – OP, please always provide an MCVE. Usually I hold off answering MCVE-less questions, but didn't think the extension assumption was too big a leap in this case (also spooky timing as always Martin :) ). – Hamish Jul 19 '17 at 19:03
  • @Hamish: You are right, I forgot that I had removed the "static". – Martin R Jul 19 '17 at 19:05
5

Assuming you're defining this overload in a Dictionary extension, don't introduce Key and Value generic placeholders; use the generic placeholders already defined by Dictionary (as the ones you introduce yourself are completely unrelated to them):

extension Dictionary {

    static func += (left: inout [Key: Value], right: [Key: Value]) {
        for (key, value) in right {
            left[key] = value
        }
    }
}

var properties = ["Key": "Value"]
let newProperties = ["NewKey": "NewValue"]
properties += newProperties
print(properties) // ["NewKey": "NewValue", "Key": "Value"]

And you could also let Swift infer this by just taking Dictionary operands:

extension Dictionary {

    static func += (left: inout Dictionary, right: Dictionary) {
        for (key, value) in right {
            left[key] = value
        }
    }
}
11

Swift 4 alternatives

Since Swift 4 is around the corner, I'll add an answer (addressing, specifically, the question or the title) including additional approaches available upon its release.

The evolution proposal

is implemented in Swift 4, and will allow you to use methods such as the mutating merge(_:uniquingKeysWith:) (or the non-mutating merging(_:uniquingKeysWith:)) to combine two dictionaries, which also allows you to specify how to resolve key collisions.

E.g., implementing your += function using merge(_:uniquingKeysWith:), overwriting existing key-values (upon collisions) with the associated value in the right hand side dictionary:

extension Dictionary {

    static func += (lhs: inout Dictionary, rhs: Dictionary) {
        lhs.merge(rhs) { (_, new) in new }
    }
}

/* example usage */
var dictA = ["one":   1,
             "two":   2,
             "three": 3]

let dictB = ["three": 42,
             "four":  4]

dictA += dictB
print(dictA)
   // ["one": 1, "two": 2, "three": 42, "four": 4]
   // (any order is coincidental)

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