4

I'd like to match a word, then get everything before it up to the first occurance of a period or the start of the string.

For example, given this string and searching for the word "regex":

s = 'Do not match this. Or this. Or this either. I like regex. It is hard, but regex is also rewarding.'

It should return:

>> I like regex.
>> It is hard, but regex is also rewarding.

I'm trying to get my head around look-aheads and look-behinds, but (it seems) you can't easily look back until you hit something, only if it's immediately next to your pattern. I can get pretty close with this:

pattern = re.compile(r'(?:(?<=\.)|(?<=^))(.*?regex.*?\.)')

But it gives me the first period, then everything up to "regex":

>> Do not match this. Or this. Or this either. I like regex.  # no!
>> It is hard, but regex is also rewarding.                   # correct
6

You don't need to use lookarounds to do that. The negated character class is your best friend:

(?:[^\s.][^.]*)?regex[^.]*\.?

or

[^.]*regex[^.]*\.?

this way you take any characters before the word "regex" and forbids any of these characters to be a dot.

The first pattern stripes white-spaces on the left, the second one is more basic.

About your pattern:

Don't forget that a regex engine tries to succeed at each position from the left to the right of the string. That's why something like (?:(?<=\.)|(?<=^)).*?regex doesn't always return the shortest substring between a dot or the start of the string and the word "regex", even if you use a non-greedy quantifier. The leftmost position always wins and a non-greedy quantifier takes characters until the next subpattern succeeds.

As an aside, one more time, the negated character class can be useful:
to shorten (?:(?<=\.)|(?<=^)) you can write (?<![^.])

  • If I'm understanding your shorter version, the * grabs anything, essentially backwards until it hits a period, and the same forwards too? – JeffThompson Jul 21 '17 at 0:09
  • 1
    @JeffThompson: no, a regex engine works from the left to the right and tests all positions in a string until the pattern succeeds. Test it with regex101.com and use the debugger to see what happens. – Casimir et Hippolyte Jul 21 '17 at 0:12
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    @JeffThompson: [^.]* grabs anything forward and gives back characters one by one until the next subpattern ("regex") succeeds. If it doesn't work, the regex engine tries the same from the next position in the string. – Casimir et Hippolyte Jul 21 '17 at 0:16

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