3

I am using Python 2.6+ and would like to append double quotes to a string and store it as a new string variable. I do not want to print it but use it later in my python script.

For example:

a = 'apple'
b = some_function(a) --> b would be equal to '"apple"'

How can I do this? All the solutions that I have looked at so far only work when printing the string.

6
  • I don't understand the use case here. – Arpit Solanki Jul 20 '17 at 7:27
  • 2
    I'm sure that if you'll try you'll be able to concatenate strings in Python! – Nir Alfasi Jul 20 '17 at 7:27
  • 2
    '"' + a + '"' – cs95 Jul 20 '17 at 7:27
  • a = "apple" initially and will end up being a = '"apple"' unless apple is a variable and not a string to begin with – Ma0 Jul 20 '17 at 7:28
  • What do you mean "only work when printing the string?" – juanpa.arrivillaga Jul 20 '17 at 7:37
15

Beautiful usage in python

b = '"{}"'.format(a)

in python 3.6 (or above)

b = f'"{a}"'

work same!

2
  • Fstrings are Python 3.6+ fyi – Luke Jul 20 '17 at 9:24
  • It's awesome! : ) – Maybe Jul 21 '17 at 1:21
6
b = '"' + a + '"'

Notice that I am enclosing the double quotes in single quotes - both are valid in Python.

1
  • Or if you happen to somehow need to print("\"") --> " – Luke Jul 20 '17 at 9:25
2
def add_quote(a):
    return '"{0}"'.format(a)

and call it:

a = 'apple'
b = add_quote(a) # output => '"apple"'
1

You can try this way :

def some_function(a):
    b = '"' + a + '"'
    return b

if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = 'apple'
    b = some_function(a)
    print(b)

Output:

"apple"

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