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With Java 9, new factory methods have been introduced for the List, Set and Map interfaces. These methods allow quickly instantiating a Map object with values in one line. Now, if we consider:

Map<Integer, String> map1 = new HashMap<Integer, String>(Map.of(1, "value1", 2, "value2", 3, "value3"));
map1.put(4, null);

The above is allowed without any exception while if we do:

Map<Integer, String> map2 = Map.of(1, "value1", 2, "value2", 3, "value3", 4, null );

It throws:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
    at java.base/java.util.Objects.requireNonNull(Objects.java:221)
..

I am not able to get, why null is not allowed in second case.

I know HashMap can take null as a key as well as a value but why was that restricted in the case of Map.of?

The same thing happens in the case of java.util.Set.of("v1", "v2", null) and java.util.List.of("v1", "v2", null).

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    The question is wrong. Should be: why does HashMap allow nulls? – ZhekaKozlov Jul 20 '17 at 9:55
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    @ZhekaKozlov When we are able to wrap a Map with HashMap, it should allow the features of hashmap or Hashmap should not be allowed to wrap it. Since "of" fn is related to immutability, it should be there in the ConcurrentMap may be which is extended by ConcurrentHashmap or so. – hi.nitish Jul 20 '17 at 10:22
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    @hi.nitish: It may be time to accept an answer. 😉 – Nicolai Parlog Dec 20 '17 at 12:29
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    prohibiting null keys I can understand but null values seems viable to me – mjj1409 Aug 21 '20 at 19:58
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+200

As others pointed out, the Map contract allows rejecting nulls...

[S]ome implementations prohibit null keys and values [...]. Attempting to insert an ineligible key or value throws an unchecked exception, typically NullPointerException or ClassCastException.

... and the collection factories (not just on maps) make use of that.

They disallow null keys and values. Attempts to create them with null keys or values result in NullPointerException.

But why?

Allowing null in collections is by now seen as a design error. This has a variety of reasons. A good one is usability, where the most prominent trouble maker is Map::get. If it returns null, it is unclear whether the key is missing or the value was null. Generally speaking, collections that are guaranteed null free are easier to use. Implementation-wise, they also require less special casing, making the code easier to maintain and more performant.

You can listen to Stuart Marks explain it in this talk but JEP 269 (the one that introduced the factory methods) summarizes it as well:

Null elements, keys, and values will be disallowed. (No recently introduced collections have supported nulls.) In addition, prohibiting nulls offers opportunities for a more compact internal representation, faster access, and fewer special cases.

Since HashMap was already out in the wild when this was slowly discovered, it was too late to change it without breaking existing code but most recent implementations of those interfaces (e.g. ConcurrentHashMap) do not allow null anymore and the new collections for the factory methods are no exception.

(I thought another reason was that explicitly using null values was seen as a likely implementation error but I got that wrong. That was about to duplicate keys, which are illegal as well.)

So disallowing null had some technical reason but it was also done to improve the robustness of the code using the created collections.

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    well... I can think of case: when you have an Entry in your HashMap that has a certain key and value == null. You do get, it returns null. What does the mean? It has a mapping of null or it is not present? Also handling null keys is always different, you can't compute hashcode... disallowing it to begin with makes it easier to work – Eugene Jul 20 '17 at 9:30
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    I wouldn't regard that as a technical but a usability reason. Still, a good point, so I included it. – Nicolai Parlog Jul 20 '17 at 9:38
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    JEP 269 has this on null: "Null elements, keys, and values will be disallowed. (No recently introduced collections have supported nulls.) In addition, prohibiting nulls offers opportunities for a more compact internal representation, faster access, and fewer special cases." – Stefan Zobel Jul 20 '17 at 15:23
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    The only usability reason would be get returning null. But instead of extending Map with a new method that returns an Optional this petty restriction was put into place which solves absolutely nothing because any code dealing with a Map still can't rely on not getting null back. In the mean while, people that want to pass a constant Map somewhere that happens to allow null values with good reason can't make use of this very convenient feature. – john16384 Mar 30 '20 at 19:12
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    @john16384 Optional-s sole mission is to avoid explicit null handling and if your suggestion were put in practice every call to an Optional-returning method would have to make a null check and still deal with the empty case. That's a preposterous proposal. Regarding runtime surprises, you are aware that Map implementations are free to throw NPEs if you try to put a null key or value, right? (ConcurrentHashMap does that.) How did you cope with that so far? – Nicolai Parlog Apr 5 '20 at 11:30
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Exactly - a HashMap is allowed to store null, not the Map returned by the static factory methods. Not all maps are the same.

Generally as far as I know it has a mistake in the first place to allow nulls in the HashMap as keys, newer collections ban that possibility to start with.

Think of the case when you have an Entry in your HashMap that has a certain key and value == null. You do get, it returns null. What does the mean? It has a mapping of null or it is not present?

Same goes for a Key - hashcode from such a null key has to treated specially all the time. Banning nulls to start with - make this easier.

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  • Yes it might be considered as a fault left in the implementation but so are many other things that do not conform to object oriented principles. However, the developers are using the null frequently in hashmap and they put it in a check of if case to initialise a lot of other things in the business logic. – hi.nitish Jul 20 '17 at 9:42
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    I like your answer - as it gets to the why part of things! – GhostCat Jul 20 '17 at 13:21
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While HashMap does allow null values, Map.of does not use a HashMap and throws an exception if one is used either as key or value, as documented:

The Map.of() and Map.ofEntries() static factory methods provide a convenient way to create immutable maps. The Map instances created by these methods have the following characteristics:

  • ...

  • They disallow null keys and values. Attempts to create them with null keys or values result in NullPointerException.

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  • But why disallowed when it is allowed in HashMap? – hi.nitish Jul 20 '17 at 9:43
  • I don't think that anyone but Java developers can reliably answer to why. – 1615903 Jul 20 '17 at 10:09
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    Because they realized it was a mistake to allow nulls in HashMap. – TimK Jul 25 '17 at 22:12
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Allowing nulls in maps has been an error. We can see it now, but I guess it wasn't clear when HashMap was introduced. NullpointerException is the most common bug seen in production code.

I would say that the JDK goes in the direction of helping developers fight the NPE plague. Some examples:

  • Introduction of Optional
  • Collectors.toMap(keyMapper, valueMapper) doesn't allow neither the keyMapper nor the valueMapper function to return a null value
  • Stream.findFirst() and Stream.findAny() throw NPE if the value found is null

So, I think that disallowing null in the new JDK9 immutable collections (and maps) goes in the same direction.

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  • Nothing in the above explains the rationale why null should not be allowed as a value in a Map. The fact that NPE might be the most common error has nothing to do with this. It is not a "plague" to anyone that actually checks their inputs or documents what is allowed and what isn't. Optional doesn't solve this either, or are you suggesting we should create Maps of the type Map<Key, Optional<Value>> ? – john16384 Jan 23 at 17:38
  • @john16384 The question is Why does Map.of not allow null keys and values? and my answer is that it is by design, because of NullPointerException prevalence throughout decades. And I've given examples of other JDK classes where nulls are not allowed either. I'm not suggesting anything – fps Jan 23 at 18:25
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The major difference is: when you build your own Map the "option 1" way ... then you are implicitly saying: "I want to have full freedom in what I am doing".

So, when you decide that your map should have a null key or value (maybe for the reasons listed here) then you are free to do so.

But "option 2" is about a convenience thing - probably intended to be used for constants. And the people behind Java simply decided: "when you use these convenience methods, then the resulting map shall be null-free".

Allowing for null values means that

 if (map.contains(key)) 

is not the same as

 if (map.get(key) != null)

which might be a problem sometimes. Or more precisely: it is something to remember when dealing with that very map object.

And just an anecdotal hint why this seems to be a reasonable approach: our team implemented similar convenience methods ourselves. And guess what: without knowing anything about plans about future Java standard methods - our methods do the exact same thing: they return an immutable copy of the incoming data; and they throw up when you provide null elements. We are even so strict that when you pass in empty lists/maps/... we complain as well.

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  • Why would map.put(key, null) return true for map.contains(key) in the first place? – Pedro Borges May 14 '20 at 21:01
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In my opinion non-nullability makes sense for keys, but not for values.

  1. The Map interface becomes a weak contract, you can't trust it's behaviour without looking at the implementation, and that is assuming you have access to see it. Java11's Map.of() does not allow null values while HashMap does, but they both implement the same Map contract - how come?
  2. Having a null value or no value at all could not, and arguably should not be considered as a distinct scenario. When you get the value for a key and you get null, who cares if it was explicitly put there or not? there's simply no value for the supplied key, the map does not contain such key, simple as that. Null is null, there's no nullnull or null^2
  3. Existing libraries make extensive use of map as a means to pass properties to them, many of them optional, this makes Map.of() useless as a construct for such structures.
  4. Kotlin enforces nullability at compile time and allows for maps with null values with no known issues.
  5. The reason behind not allowing null values is probably just due to implementation detail and convenience of the creator.
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Not all Maps allow null as key

The reason mentioned in the docs of Map.

Some map implementations have restrictions on the keys and values they may contain. For example, some implementations prohibit null keys and values, and some have restrictions on the types of their keys. Attempting to insert an ineligible key or value throws an unchecked exception, typically NullPointerException or ClassCastException.

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The documentation does not say why null is not allowed:

They disallow null keys and values. Attempts to create them with null keys or values result in NullPointerException.

In my opinion, the Map.of() and Map.ofEntries() static factory methods, which are going to produce a constant, are mostly formed by a developer at the compile type. Then, what is the reason to keep a null as the key or the value?

Whereas, the Map#put is usually used by filling a map at runtime where null keys/values could occur.

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    @Eugene if every one had read the documentation (and understood it), this site would have only a fraction of the questions it has now. – user85421 Jul 20 '17 at 9:33
  • @CarlosHeuberger It may be possible that there is a tendency to get rid of the null in future jdks and so the primitives I guess. I read the Map.of() always return an immutable map so does that null have anything to do with immutability here? – hi.nitish Jul 21 '17 at 6:05
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    @hi.nitish actually it is somewhat related to the immutability: Map.of() returns an instance of ImmutableCollections.MapN which uses a table having null to indicate its end. Doc of that class: "There is a single array "table" that * contains keys and values interleaved ... The table size must be even. It must also be strictly larger than the size (the number of key-value pairs contained in the map) so that at least one null key is always present" Why it is done that way, instead of just using an int to hold the size, I don't know; maybe hashing... (the code is a bit scary) – user85421 Jul 21 '17 at 7:56
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    Just because you can't see a reason does not mean there aren't valid use cases. A Map with key/value pairs intended for fields in a database for example benefits from null values. I guess it's back to a NULL placeholder object for those. IMHO the reason is petty, or simply an overreaction to the anti-null mentality. – john16384 Mar 30 '20 at 19:07

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