112
let httpParams = new HttpParams().set('aaa', '111');
httpParams.set('bbb', '222');

Why this doesn't work? It only set the 'aaa' and NOT the 'bbb'

Also, I have an object { aaa: 111, bbb: 222 } How can I set all the values without looping?

UPDATE (this seems to work, but how can avoid the loop?)

let httpParams = new HttpParams();
Object.keys(data).forEach(function (key) {
     httpParams = httpParams.append(key, data[key]);
});
3
  • 3
    I agree with you that httpParams.set('bbb', '222'); should work. I tried that first and was very confused. But replace that line with httpParams = httpParams.set('bbb','222'); works. for those who are only setting 2, the chaining answer from another User below is also nice.
    – Angela P
    Jul 28, 2017 at 14:25
  • 1
    just use assignment (=) as @AngelaPan has suggested and you don't have to use loop. Also read about mutable and immutable.
    – Junaid
    Feb 15, 2018 at 7:46
  • please vote for the conditional HttpParams set update feature: github.com/angular/angular/issues/26021
    – serge
    Sep 19, 2018 at 16:32

17 Answers 17

107

HttpParams is intended to be immutable. The set and append methods don't modify the existing instance. Instead they return new instances, with the changes applied.

let params = new HttpParams().set('aaa', 'A');    // now it has aaa
params = params.set('bbb', 'B');                  // now it has both

This approach works well with method chaining:

const params = new HttpParams()
  .set('one', '1')
  .set('two', '2');

...though that might be awkward if you need to wrap any of them in conditions.

Your loop works because you're grabbing a reference to the returned new instance. The code you posted that doesn't work, doesn't. It just calls set() but doesn't grab the result.

let httpParams = new HttpParams().set('aaa', '111'); // now it has aaa
httpParams.set('bbb', '222');                        // result has both but is discarded
1
  • 5
    How bizarre the choice of an inmutable HttpParams, this was the blocking point and should be the accepted answer
    – Nicolas
    Apr 3, 2020 at 14:06
107

Before 5.0.0-beta.6

let httpParams = new HttpParams();
Object.keys(data).forEach(function (key) {
     httpParams = httpParams.append(key, data[key]);
});

Since 5.0.0-beta.6

Since 5.0.0-beta.6 (2017-09-03) they added new feature (accept object map for HttpClient headers & params)

Going forward the object can be passed directly instead of HttpParams.

getCountries(data: any) {
    // We don't need any more these lines
    // let httpParams = new HttpParams();
    // Object.keys(data).forEach(function (key) {
    //     httpParams = httpParams.append(key, data[key]);
    // });

    return this.httpClient.get("/api/countries", {params: data})
}
4
  • I'm using 5.2.6 and it definitely won't take a dictionary for the params piece unless I explicitly case it to any. Is that really the intended use?
    – Gargoyle
    Feb 27, 2018 at 0:35
  • 8
    @Gargoyle - you can just cast your object to any { params: <any>params } to avoid ts compiler issues
    – Kieran
    Nov 4, 2018 at 22:05
  • 2
    Params of type string that are null will return "null" and Doesn't Support Number, Boolean and Date Apr 12, 2019 at 14:59
  • Here is a link to the bug report for the lack of Number, Boolean and Date support: github.com/angular/angular/issues/23856
    – EpicVoyage
    Sep 12, 2019 at 18:40
57

In more recent versions of @angular/common/http (5.0 and up, by the looks of it), you can use the fromObject key of HttpParamsOptions to pass the object straight in:

let httpParams = new HttpParams({ fromObject: { aaa: 111, bbb: 222 } });

This just runs a forEach loop under the hood, though:

this.map = new Map<string, string[]>();
Object.keys(options.fromObject).forEach(key => {
  const value = (options.fromObject as any)[key];
  this.map !.set(key, Array.isArray(value) ? value : [value]);
});
12
  • why are you saying fromObject? It can be any object. Jun 6, 2020 at 1:39
  • @ChristianMatthew the constructor of HttpParams can't take "any object", it takes HttpParamsOptions. If you mean you can pass any object as params to a request: yes, but only from v5. Otherwise I'm not sure what you're asking.
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 6, 2020 at 7:04
  • the word fromObject << what is that properly Jun 6, 2020 at 18:31
  • @ChristianMatthew I don't know what you're asking. Do you want to know what that property is? Did you look at the API docs? Or the example in the answer?
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 6, 2020 at 19:52
  • 1
    @ChristianMatthew I don't know what you're asking. What do you mean "API version". Angular version? You can see which commit I've linked to in the answer and I said explicitly it was introduced in 5.0. You can also go and see it in master right now: github.com/angular/angular/blob/master/packages/common/http/src/…. It's not clear to me what problem you have.
    – jonrsharpe
    Jun 6, 2020 at 20:17
31

Couple of Easy Alternatives

Without using HttpParams Objects

let body = {
   params : {
    'email' : emailId,
    'password' : password
   }
}

this.http.post(url, body);

Using HttpParams Objects

let body = new HttpParams({
  fromObject : {
    'email' : emailId,
    'password' : password
  }
})

this.http.post(url, body);
3
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Simple and clean.
    – Argo
    Apr 16, 2020 at 7:01
  • 1
    How do you use this with typescript ? If I have a "AuthType" typescript interface with email/password, when using fromObject with this interface it complains that the wrong type is used ? new HttpParams({ fromObject: typedObject } generates a warning "Type YourCustomType is not assignable to type { [param: string]: string | readonly string[] } Apr 18, 2021 at 18:54
  • 1
    Ah, I found out that using new HttpParams({ fromObject: { ...typedObject } } is a way to circumvent the problem. Apr 18, 2021 at 18:55
23

As for me, chaining set methods is the cleanest way

const params = new HttpParams()
.set('aaa', '111')
.set('bbb', "222");
2
  • 3
    HttpParams is immutable like HttpHeaders, which means that the second .set() call will not work in this case. It needs to be set in one hit or goes with the .append() method assigning the output to a new variable as the OP suggested on his update.
    – WPalombini
    Jul 27, 2017 at 5:30
  • 2
    @WPalombini I just tried Mike's chaining set. and it does work! I think it's nice for people that only has 2 parameters. It's easy to understand.
    – Angela P
    Jul 28, 2017 at 14:18
18

Another way to do it is:

this.httpClient.get('path', {
    params: Object.entries(data).reduce((params, [key, value]) => params.set(key, value), new HttpParams());
});
2
9

Since HTTP Params class is immutable therefore you need to chain the set method:

const params = new HttpParams()
.set('aaa', '111')
.set('bbb', "222");
7

Using this you can avoid the loop.

// obj is the params object with key-value pair. 
// This is how you convert that to HttpParams and pass this to GET API. 

const params = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj)
               .reduce((p, key) => p.set(key, obj[key]), new HttpParams());

Furthermore, I suggest making toHttpParams function in your commonly used service. So you can call the function to convert the object to the HttpParams.

/**
 * Convert Object to HttpParams
 * @param {Object} obj
 * @returns {HttpParams}
 */
toHttpParams(obj: Object): HttpParams {
    return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj)
        .reduce((p, key) => p.set(key, obj[key]), new HttpParams());
}

Update:

Since 5.0.0-beta.6 (2017-09-03) they added new feature (accept object map for HttpClient headers & params)

Going forward the object can be passed directly instead of HttpParams.

This is the other reason if you have used one common function like toHttpParams mentioned above, you can easily remove it or do changes if required.

1
  • Hi its working fine but append extra undefined key value as param Jan 10, 2018 at 11:18
3

As far as I can see from the implementation at https://github.com/angular/angular/blob/master/packages/common/http/src/params.ts

You must provide values separately - You are not able to avoid your loop.

There is also a constructor which takes a string as a parameter, but it is in form param=value&param2=value2 so there is no deal for You (in both cases you will finish with looping your object).

You can always report an issue/feature request to angular, what I strongly advise: https://github.com/angular/angular/issues

PS: Remember about difference between set and append methods ;)

1
3

appendAll function

import { HttpParams } from "@angular/common/http";

export class BuildUrl {

    /**
     * append all params
     * @param args {unknown[]}
     * @returns {HttpParams}
     */
    static appendAll(...args: unknown[]): HttpParams {
        let params = new HttpParams();
        args.forEach(param => {
            Object.keys(param).forEach((key) => {
                params = params.append(key, param[key]);
            });
        });
        return params;
    }
}

how we use it in the service.

getData( pag: PaginationRequest, description: string = ''): Observable<any> {
    const params = BuildUrl.appendAll(pag,
      { description },
    );
    return this.http.get(url, { params });
  }
2

My helper class (ts) to convert any complex dto object (not only "string dictionary") to HttpParams:

import { HttpParams } from "@angular/common/http";

export class HttpHelper {
  static toHttpParams(obj: any): HttpParams {
    return this.addToHttpParams(new HttpParams(), obj, null);
  }

  private static addToHttpParams(params: HttpParams, obj: any, prefix: string): HttpParams {    
    for (const p in obj) {
      if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
        var k = p;
        if (prefix) {
          if (p.match(/^-{0,1}\d+$/)) {
            k = prefix + "[" + p + "]";
          } else {
            k = prefix + "." + p;
          }
        }        
        var v = obj[p];
        if (v !== null && typeof v === "object" && !(v instanceof Date)) {
          params = this.addToHttpParams(params, v, k);
        } else if (v !== undefined) {
          if (v instanceof Date) {
            params = params.set(k, (v as Date).toISOString()); //serialize date as you want
          }
          else {
            params = params.set(k, v);
          }

        }
      }
    }
    return params;
  }
}

console.info(
  HttpHelper.toHttpParams({
    id: 10,
    date: new Date(),
    states: [1, 3],
    child: {
      code: "111"
    }
  }).toString()
); // id=10&date=2019-08-02T13:19:09.014Z&states%5B0%5D=1&states%5B1%5D=3&child.code=111
1
2

Just wanted to add that if you want to add several parameters with the same key name for example: www.test.com/home?id=1&id=2

let params = new HttpParams();
params = params.append(key, value);

Use append, if you use set, it will overwrite the previous value with the same key name.

2

Since @MaciejTreder confirmed that we have to loop, here's a wrapper that will optionally let you add to a set of default params:

    function genParams(params: object, httpParams = new HttpParams()): object {
        Object.keys(params)
            .filter(key => {
                let v = params[key];
                return (Array.isArray(v) || typeof v === 'string') ? 
                    (v.length > 0) : 
                    (v !== null && v !== undefined);
            })
            .forEach(key => {
                httpParams = httpParams.set(key, params[key]);
            });
        return { params: httpParams };
    }

You can use it like so:

    const OPTIONS = {
        headers: new HttpHeaders({
            'Content-Type': 'application/json'
        }),
        params: new HttpParams().set('verbose', 'true')
    };
    let opts = Object.assign({}, OPTIONS, genParams({ id: 1 }, OPTIONS.params));
    this.http.get(BASE_URL, opts); // --> ...?verbose=true&id=1
1

This solutions working for me,

let params = new HttpParams(); Object.keys(data).forEach(p => { params = params.append(p.toString(), data[p].toString()); });

0

Using set()

From Angular Official Documentation of set()

set(param: string, value: string | number | boolean): HttpParams

Returns HttpParams: A new body with the new value.

Now, lets see how we can add some parameters -

const params = new HttpParams()
    .set('aaa', '111')
    .set('bbb', "222");

Notice that we are constructing the HTTPParams object by chaining set() methods. The reason is HTTPParams is immutable.

Every time a call to set method will return a new HttpParams object with the new value. We need to first grab the returned HttpParams object and then use that for further modification.

So, If we do the following, it will not work

const params = new HttpParams(); // empty HttpParams object

params.set('aaa', '111'); // lost
params.set('bbb', "222"); // lost

We are only calling set but not keeping the returned HttpParams object. So, lastly we would have an empty HttpParams object, and the two calls to set would have add no effect. To make it work, wee need to do the following -

const params = new HttpParams(); // empty HttpParams object

params = params.set('aaa', '111'); // storing the returned HttpParams object, now **it has aaa**
params = params.set('bbb', "222"); // add another parameter and store it. so now **it has both aaa and bbb**

Using fromString

you can also use fromString to create httpParams. It's good when you already have a Query parameters string prepared. you can do it using the following syntax

const params = new HttpParams({
  fromString: 'aaa=111&bbb=222'
});
0

Angular 14

This method works well on Angular 14. Passing parameters to the backend using HttpParams

get<T>(path: string): Observable<T> {
    let httpParams = new HttpParams();
    httpParams = httpParams.append("language", "en");
    httpParams = httpParams.append("pageNo", 1);
    httpParams = httpParams.append("pageSize", 10);

    const options = { params: httpParams };

    return this.http.get<T>(`${this.apiUrl}/${path}`, options);
}

// T is a generic type returned by the `get` method.
-1
 getHttpParams(data: any) {
   let httpParams = new HttpParams();
   Object.keys(data).forEach(key => {
     if (data[key] != null) {
       if (typeof data[key] === "object") {
         var childData = data[key];
         Object.keys(childData).forEach(childKey => {
           httpParams = httpParams.append(childKey, childData[childKey]);
         });
       } else {
         httpParams = httpParams.append(key, data[key]);
       }
     }
   });
   return httpParams;
 }

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