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I have been reading about generics and want to understand how generics work within flow.

https://flow.org/en/docs/types/generics/#toc-function-types-with-generics

I am especially interested in the idea of using flow to check function signatures for functional programming.

However I cannot understand why the following does not work:

When I try

/* @flow */

const identity = (c) => c;

(identity: <T>(T) => T); // force flow to typecheck

Then Flow returns an error:

3: const identity = (c) => c;
                           ^ T. This type is incompatible with
5: (identity: <T>(T) => T);
    ^ some incompatible instantiation of `T`

I would have thought that because c is always c and has not been mutated it's type must match the pattern?

Q: How do I express to flow that the function must return the same type as the first parameter?


Supplimentary Example

Even when I try using a type alias it doesn't seem to work.

/* @flow */
type ReturnsSameTypeAsFirstParam = <T>(T) => T;

const identity:ReturnsSameTypeAsFirstParam = (c) => c;

I then get:

4: const identity:ReturnsSameTypeAsFirstParam = (c) => c;
                                                       ^ T. This type is incompatible with
4: const identity:ReturnsSameTypeAsFirstParam = (c) => c;
                                                ^ some incompatible instantiation of `T`

EDIT: Attempt at clarification

I am mainly keen to provide a type for functions as arguments and understand how to use them polymorphically.

Perhaps this is a clearer example of the kind of thing I am trying to type:

/* @flow */

type Transformer = <T>(T)=>T;

function transformAGivenThing(transform:Transformer, thing:*) {
  return transform(thing);
}

function transformAString(str:string):string {
  return str.toUpperCase();
}

transformAGivenThing(transformAString, 'thing');

This causes these errors when I run flow:

3: type Transformer = <T>(T)=>T;
                       ^ T. This type is incompatible with the expected param type of
9: function transformAString(str:string):string {
                             ^ string
9: function transformAString(str:string):string {
                                         ^ string. This type is incompatible with the expected param type of
13: transformAGivenThing(transformAString, 'thing');
                     ^ some incompatible instantiation of `T`
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Edited regarding the addition to your post.

/* @flow */

const isStr = (str: string) => !!str;
const isNmbr = (nmbr: number) => !!nmbr;

function transformAny<T>(transformer: (T) => T, thing: T): T {
  return transformer(thing);
}

function transformString(thing: string): string {
  return !!thing ? thing.toUpperCase() : thing;
}

function transformNumber(thing: number): number {
  return !!thing ? thing * 10 : thing;
}

let s = transformAny(transformString, "1");

let n = transformAny(transformNumber, 5);

isStr(s);
// isStr(n);
// isNmbr(s);
isNmbr(n);

Uncommenting the 2 calls for typechecking will throw an error of missmatching parameter types. I dont think you can declare a custom type for one of the parameters and return the corresponding type as well. This is the first time I see this languague, but it looks very similar to TypeScript.

  • Hmm maybe I am not being clear enough with what I am trying to achieve here. I will attempt to update my question. – rickard Jul 20 '17 at 13:41
  • @rickard I have edited my post. Is this what you are trying to do with the generic object transformer? – Shane van den Bogaard Jul 20 '17 at 14:59
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Ok so I ended up submitting an issue to flow asking for the way to do this. Their answer:

/* @flow */

type Transformer<T> = (T)=>T;

function transformAGivenThing(transform:Transformer<*>, thing:*) {
  return transform(thing);
}

function uppercaseAString(str:string):string {
  return str.toUpperCase();
}

console.log(transformAGivenThing(uppercaseAString, 'thing'));

https://github.com/facebook/flow/issues/4429

What is happening is that you need to configure the Transformer generic type with a Type but in this case because it needs to be polymorphic the configuration should be a *

  • When calling let s = transformAGivenThing(uppercaseAString, 'thing');, the returned type will be any. If you check my updated answer, the return type is corresponding to the returned type of the given transformer. Proper intellisense will pick that up. – Shane van den Bogaard Jul 20 '17 at 17:37
  • There is a difference between * and any. * means defer type checking downstream whilst any means do not type check. Because * defers type checking until later, the types in the generic resolve, in the example above, at the point where flow checks the uppercaseAString function. – rickard Jul 20 '17 at 20:50

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