17

I have a bunch of projects in my ~/Documents. I work almost exclusively in python, so these are basically all python projects. Each one, e.g. ~/Documents/foo has its own virtualenv, ~/Documents/foo/venv (they're always called venv). Whenever I switch between projects, which is ~10 times a day, I do

deactivate
cd ..
cd foo
source venv/bin/activate

I've reached the point where I'm sick of typing deactivate and source venv/bin/activate. I'm looking for a way to just cd ../foo and have the virtualenv operations handled for me.

  • I'm familiar with VirtualEnvWrapper which is a little heavy-handed in my opinion. It seems to move all your virtualenvs somewhere else, and adds a little more complexity than it removes, as far as I can tell. (Dissenting opinions welcome!)

  • I am not too familiar with shell scripting. If you can recommend a low-maintenance script to add to my ~/.zshrc that accomplishes this, that would be more than enough, but from some quick googling, I haven't found such a script.

  • I'm a zsh/oh-my-zsh user. oh-my-zsh doesn't seem to have a plugin for this. The best answer to this question would be someone contributing an oh-my-zsh plugin which does this. (Which I might do if the answers here are lackluster.

10 Answers 10

7

Put something like this in your .zshrc

function cd() {
  if [[ -d ./venv ]] ; then
    deactivate
  fi

  builtin cd $1

  if [[ -d ./venv ]] ; then
    . ./venv/bin/activate
  fi
}

Edit: As noted in comments cd-ing into a subfolder of the current virtual env would deactivate it. One idea could be to deactivate the current env only if cd-ing into a new one, like

function cd() {
  builtin cd $1

  if [[ -n "$VIRTUAL_ENV" && -d ./venv ]] ; then
    deactivate
    . ./venv/bin/activate
  fi
}

that could still be improved, maybe turning it into a "prompt command" or attempting some prefix matching on the folder names to check there's a virtual env somewhere up the path, but my shell-fu is not good enough.

  • Hi @agnul. Thanks for this answer! Why . ./venv/bin/activate instead of source venv/bin/activate/ ? – Alex Lenail Jul 20 '17 at 14:29
  • 1
    "." is equivalent to "source", at least for zsh and bash – agnul Jul 20 '17 at 14:32
  • 1
    [[ -d ./venv ]] works only if current directory is the root of the project. Better test for env var: [ -n "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]. – phd Jul 20 '17 at 15:58
  • As phd points out, if I cd into a subdirectory of a project with a virtualenv, I step out of the virtualenv. However, @phd's solution isn't working for me at all. Would one of you be willing to help with this? How do I stay in the virtualenv when I'm in a directory with a virtualenv anywhere above? – Alex Lenail Aug 21 '17 at 18:17
  • Still looking for an answer to this one! – Alex Lenail Sep 8 '17 at 17:48
14

Add following in your .bashrc or .zshrc

function cd() {
  builtin cd "$@"

  if [[ -z "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]] ; then
    ## If env folder is found then activate the vitualenv
      if [[ -d ./.env ]] ; then
        source ./.env/bin/activate
      fi
  else
    ## check the current folder belong to earlier VIRTUAL_ENV folder
    # if yes then do nothing
    # else deactivate
      parentdir="$(dirname "$VIRTUAL_ENV")"
      if [[ "$PWD"/ != "$parentdir"/* ]] ; then
        deactivate
      fi
  fi
}

This code will not deactivate the virtualenv even if someone goes into subfolder. Inspired by answers of @agnul and @Gilles.

If the virtualenv is made by pipenv, then please consider this wiki page.

Furthermore, for added security please consider direnv.

  • just saw this doesn't work if you're in a project with venv and do cd ../other_proj – aivision2020 Feb 17 '19 at 15:18
  • @aivision2020 For clarification: Are the names of virtual environment folder in both the projects are .env? This code assumes the folder name for virtual environment folder to be .env. – MS_ Feb 18 '19 at 4:45
  • 1
    @boliva Thanks for pointing that out. I have the updated the code accordingly. – MS_ Feb 20 '19 at 12:12
  • 1
    @Gauthier simply grab the first block between the if and else (not inclusive), and put it after the second last fi. – Ari May 2 '19 at 15:01
  • 1
    @Ari Yeah, I formulated it as a question, but it was more a comment. Check out my own answer. – Gauthier May 2 '19 at 15:04
5

Rather than writing a custom script you could use direnv. It's not a zsh specific solution (for that you could try zsh-autoenv), but is well-maintained and easy to use with zsh. Once you've installed it, you'd want to put eval "$(direnv hook zsh)" at the end of your .zshrc. At that point you can do:

$ source ~/.zshrc
$ cd foo
$ echo "layout python" > .envrc
direnv: error .envrc is blocked. Run `direnv allow` to approve its content.
$ direnv allow
direnv: loading .envrc
direnv: export +VIRTUAL_ENV ~PATH

Now you should be in your virtualenv. You can test by running pip freeze to see that your virtualenv specific packages are installed. To deactivate

$ cd ..
direnv: unloading
1

For posterity: I used @MS_'s solution but ran into the problem where cding directly from one project to another deactivates the old virtualenv but doesn't activate the new one. This is a slightly modified version of that solution which solves this problem:

# auto activate virtualenv
# Modified solution based on https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45216663/how-to-automatically-activate-virtualenvs-when-cding-into-a-directory/56309561#56309561
function cd() {
  builtin cd "$@"

  ## Default path to virtualenv in your projects
  DEFAULT_ENV_PATH="./env"

  ## If env folder is found then activate the vitualenv
  function activate_venv() {
    if [[ -f "${DEFAULT_ENV_PATH}/bin/activate" ]] ; then 
      source "${DEFAULT_ENV_PATH}/bin/activate"
      echo "Activating ${VIRTUAL_ENV}"
    fi
  }

  if [[ -z "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]] ; then
    activate_venv
  else
    ## check the current folder belong to earlier VIRTUAL_ENV folder
    # if yes then do nothing
    # else deactivate then run a new env folder check
      parentdir="$(dirname ${VIRTUAL_ENV})"
      if [[ "$PWD"/ != "$parentdir"/* ]] ; then
        echo "Deactivating ${VIRTUAL_ENV}"
        deactivate
        activate_venv
      fi
  fi
}
1

By far the easiest option (in 2019+) is to add virtualenvwrapper into your ~/.zshrc plugins

For example:

plugins=(
  git pip python brew virtualenvwrapper
)
0

This is my solution, which:

  • checks if already at the currently active venv, and do nothing in that case
  • if there is a venv folder, deactivate the active one if there is one
  • activate the new venv whatever if there was an old one or not.

In my bash_aliases:

function cd() {
    builtin cd "$@"

    if [ $(dirname "$VIRTUAL_ENV") == $(pwd) ] ; then
        # Already at the active virtual env
        return
    fi

    if [[ -d ./venv ]] ; then
        if type deactivate > /dev/null 2>&1 ; then
            printf "Deactivating virtualenv %s\n" "$VIRTUAL_ENV"
            deactivate
        fi

        source ./venv/bin/activate
        printf "Setting up   virtualenv %s\n" "$VIRTUAL_ENV"
    fi
}
  • Hi @Gauthier. This code only work if you enter in the root directory of target virtual environment. However, if you cd into any sub-directory of the target virtual environment, it still keeps the old virtual environment active. – MS_ May 3 '19 at 11:12
  • @MS_ that's correct, it's not something I need. I guess it wouldn't be too hard to cd up all the way to / or until you find a dir venv? I considered it but will do it only when I have the need. More than that, it puts expectations on the name of the dir, whereas it should really try to be smarter and detect if a dir is a virtualenv environment by checking its content. But your answer doesn't do any of that either, am I wrong? – Gauthier May 3 '19 at 11:19
  • This doesn't deactivate when going into a non project directory (not necessarily important but I think it's nice to do). – Jonny Shanahan Jan 15 at 16:56
0

that is the solution without cd'ing, with zsh set to setop auto_cd w'll be able to change directories without cd, just type directory name and hit enter. it is anhence of above solution:

    # auto activate virtualenv
# Modified solution based on https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45216663/how-to-automatically-activate-virtualenvs-when-cding-into-a-directory/56309561#56309561
function auto_active_env() {

  ## Default path to virtualenv in your projects
  DEFAULT_ENV_PATH="./env"

  ## If env folder is found then activate the vitualenv
  function activate_venv() {
    if [[ -f "${DEFAULT_ENV_PATH}/bin/activate" ]] ; then 
      source "${DEFAULT_ENV_PATH}/bin/activate"
      echo "Activating ${VIRTUAL_ENV}"
    fi
  }

  if [[ -z "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]] ; then
    activate_venv
  else
    ## check the current folder belong to earlier VIRTUAL_ENV folder
    # if yes then do nothing
    # else deactivate then run a new env folder check
      parentdir="$(dirname ${VIRTUAL_ENV})"
      if [[ "$PWD"/ != "$parentdir"/* ]] ; then
        echo "Deactivating ${VIRTUAL_ENV}"
        deactivate
        activate_venv
      fi
  fi
}
chpwd_functions=(${chpwd_functions[@]} "auto_active_env")
0

Here is (yet) another solution to automatically activate a virtual environment; it's based on a number of the answers already posted here.

This will work for any Virtual Environment name or directory (not just ./env, ./venv, etc.). Also supports subdirectories, as well as cd-ing into symlinks of virtual environment (parent) folders.

This code searches for a pyvenv.cfg file instead of a particular named directory. If one is found within a subdirectory of the current folder, the environment is automatically activated. Once inside a virtual environment, that state is retained until you move out of the parent virtual environment directory, at which point the environment is deactivated.

Place this inside your .bashrc or .bash_profile.

function cd() {
  builtin cd "$@"

  if [[ -z "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]] ; then
      # If config file is found -> activate the vitual environment
      venv_cfg_filepath=$(find . -maxdepth 2 -type f -name 'pyvenv.cfg' 2> /dev/null)
      if [[ -z "$venv_cfg_filepath" ]]; then
        return # no config file found
      fi

      venv_filepath=$(cut -d '/' -f -2 <<< ${venv_cfg_filepath})
      if [[ -d "$venv_filepath" ]] ; then
        source "${venv_filepath}"/bin/activate
      fi
  else
    # If the current directory is not contained 
    # within the venv parent directory -> deactivate the venv.
      cur_dir=$(pwd -P)
      venv_dir="$(dirname "$VIRTUAL_ENV")"
      if [[ "$cur_dir"/ != "$venv_dir"/* ]] ; then
        deactivate
      fi
  fi
}

Personally I think it's an improvement on a lot of the solutions here, since it should work for any virtual environment

0

This is my solution:

  1. If VIRTUAL_ENV is not set then:
    1. Check if we're inside a virtual env
    2. If yes, then activate it
  2. Else (VIRTUAL_ENV is defined), check that the current folder starts with $VIRTUAL_ENV (removing the /venv part) and verify that the deactivate command exists
    1. Deactivate teh environment

This is the script:

function cd() {
  builtin cd $1

  if [[ -z "${VIRTUAL_ENV}" ]]; then
    if [[ -d ./venv && -f ./venv/bin/activate ]]; then
      source ./venv/bin/activate
    fi
  elif [[ ! "$(pwd)" == ${VIRTUAL_ENV:0:n-5}* && ! -z "$(command -v deactivate)" ]]; then
    deactivate
  fi
}

Note: You need to add this to .bashrc. If it doesn't work, check if your .profile is not overriding your command (it happened to me)

  • This doesn't support moving from one venv directory to another – Jonny Shanahan Jan 15 at 17:01
0

Based on @MS_'s solution:

function cd() {
  builtin cd "$@"

  ## If env folder is found then activate the vitualenv
  if [[ -d ./venv ]] ; then
    source ./venv/bin/activate
  fi

  if [[ -n "$VIRTUAL_ENV" ]] ; then
    ## check the current folder belong to earlier VIRTUAL_ENV folder
    # if yes then do nothing
    # else deactivate
      parentdir="$(dirname "$VIRTUAL_ENV")"
      if [[ "$PWD"/ != "$parentdir"/* ]] ; then
        deactivate
      fi
  fi
}

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