8

I would like to implement a template function which generates bitmasks in compile-time for integral types. These masks should be based on 8-bit patterns where the pattern will be repeated consecutively to fill the integer. The following example does exactly what I want but in run-time:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <cstring>

template<typename Int>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<Int>::value, Int>::type
make_mask(unsigned char pattern) {
    Int output {};
    std::memset(&output, pattern, sizeof(Int));
    return output;
}

int main() {
    auto mask = make_mask<unsigned long>(0xf0);
    std::cout << "Bitmask: '" << std::hex << mask << "'" << std::endl;
}

The output of the code above is:

Bitmask: 'f0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0'

I know that the optimizer can eliminate the entire function call in the code above, but I'm looking for a constexpr solution with and optionally with .

12

Intuitively, I'd make a byte repeater:

template<class Int, int count, int byte>
struct byte_repeater;

template<class Int, int byte>
struct byte_repeater<Int, 1, byte> {
    static const Int value = byte;
};

template<class Int, int count, int byte>
struct byte_repeater {
    static const Int value = (byte_repeater<Int, count-1, byte>::value << CHAR_BIT) | byte;
};

An easy to use interface:

template<class Int, int mask> 
struct make_mask {
    static const Int value = byte_repeater<Int, sizeof(Int), mask>::value;
};

And this works in C++03. Maybe even older. Compilation Here.

In newer versions of C++, there's probably ways to make this simpler. Heck, even in C++03, it can probably be simplified.

  • Your example works with C++98 too. I think the byte_repeater is not necessary, its count parameter in primary template can be initialized as count = sizeof(Int) then the byte_repeater can be used in the same way as make_mask if the count is the last parameter. Nevertheless it's a good point making separate templates to hide count parameter which is only an implementation detail. – Akira Jul 21 '17 at 9:04
  • 1
    Despite the other answers was helpful too and hard to choose the one to accept, I accept this one because of backward compatibility. – Akira Jul 21 '17 at 12:09
4

You can just write it out:

template<typename Int, typename = std::enable_if_t<std::is_integral<Int>::value>>
constexpr Int make_mask(unsigned char pattern) {
    constexpr auto numBytes = sizeof(Int);
    Int result = 0;

    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < numBytes; i++) {
        result |= static_cast<Int>(pattern) << (i*8);
    }

    return result;
}

Demo

This only works for unsigned types, but you can make it work for signed types by calling the unsigned version and casting it to the signed type:

template<typename Int, std::enable_if_t<std::is_integral<Int>::value && std::is_unsigned<Int>::value, int> = 0>
constexpr Int make_mask(unsigned char pattern) {
    constexpr auto numBytes = sizeof(Int);
    Int result = 0;

    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < numBytes; i++) {
        result |= static_cast<Int>(pattern) << (i*8);
    }

    return result;
}

template<typename Int, std::enable_if_t<std::is_integral<Int>::value && std::is_signed<Int>::value, int> = 0>
constexpr Int make_mask(unsigned char pattern) {
    return static_cast<Int>(make_mask<std::make_unsigned_t<Int>>(pattern));
}

Demo

  • I like how your solution handles the signed and unsigned integral types. A very easy to understand solution for C++14 and above. Thanks for that! – Akira Jul 21 '17 at 9:05
4

I'm not sure there's a well-defined solution for signed types. For unsigned types, I'd go with:

template<class Int>
constexpr typename std::enable_if</* std::is_integral<Int>::value && */ std::is_unsigned<Int>::value,
Int>::type make_mask(const unsigned char pattern) {
    return ((std::numeric_limits<Int>::max() / std::numeric_limits<unsigned char>::max()) * pattern);
}

This should work provided that std::numeric_limits<Int>::max() is a multiple of std::numeric_limits<unsigned char>::max(); you could add a check for that to the std::enable_if condition and use another solution if that check fails.

  • 1
    Nice solution! But I suppose that if you check for std::is_unsigned you can avoid to check for std::is_integral. I mean: the SFINAE part could be simplified as typename std::enable_if<std::is_unsigned<Int>::value, Int>::type – max66 Jul 21 '17 at 1:01
  • Does std::is_unsigned<Int>::value == true imply that std::is_integral<Int>::value == true? I can believe that, but I didn't see that guarantee during my brief searching. – Joshua Green Jul 21 '17 at 1:12
  • According to ccpreference, std::is_unsigned is true only for "unsigned integer types and the type bool"; maybe fail for the type bool. – max66 Jul 21 '17 at 1:21
  • 1
    Excellent solution! Combined with the solution given by @Justin it can be used with signed integral types too, and works with C++11 as well. I like how you used division to generate pattern repeater. – Akira Jul 21 '17 at 9:07
  • 1
    The issue with signed ints is that constructing the mask might push a 1 into or through the sign bit (or simply overflow), immediately triggering undefined behavior. – Joshua Green Jul 21 '17 at 10:03
2

What about declaring make_mask() as constexpr, modify it adding a default parameter, using shift-bit, bit-or and recursion?

I mean

#include <climits>
#include <iostream>

template <typename Int>
constexpr typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<Int>::value, Int>::type
      make_mask (unsigned char pattern, std::size_t dim = sizeof(Int))
 { 
   return dim ? ((make_mask<Int>(pattern, dim-1U) << CHAR_BIT) | pattern)
              : Int{};
 }

int main ()
 {
   constexpr auto mask = make_mask<unsigned long>(0xf0);
   std::cout << "Bitmask: '" << std::hex << mask << "'" << std::endl;
 }

P.S.: works with C++11 too.

1

It's just a multiplication. Also, you will want to make sure you don't run into any traps:

  • defend against is_integral<bool> being true
  • this function has a completely different meaning in any machine that doesn't have a 8 bit byte, so just refuse to compile for those machines
  • defend against signed overflow, so just use uintmax_t

Stuffing all these checks onto the function signature is unreadable, so i used static_assert():

template <typename IntType>
constexpr IntType
make_mask ( unsigned char pattern )
{
    static_assert ( CHAR_BIT == 8, "" );
    static_assert ( std::is_integral<IntType>::value, "" );
    static_assert ( not std::is_same<typename std::decay <IntType>::type, bool>::value, "" );

    enum : uintmax_t { multiplier = std::numeric_limits <uintmax_t>::max ( ) / 0xFF };
    return static_cast <IntType> ( pattern * multiplier );
}
-3

do you really need all these complications? How about just using a macro for this?

#define PATTERN(A) 0x##A##A##A##A##A##A##A##A

cout << hex << PATTERN(f0) << endl;

will work in c++98 (and in plain 'c' without cout) :-)

or if you really want to c11/++, this also works:

constexpr long long int pattern(const long long unsigned  pattern)  {
    return (pattern << 56) | (pattern << 48) | (pattern << 40) 
           | (pattern << 32) | (pattern << 24) | (pattern << 16) 
           | (pattern << 8) | pattern ;
}
  • This is a crappy solution but it certainly works. I don't get why there are downvotes. – Henri Menke Jul 20 '17 at 23:40
  • 2
    @HenriMenke Because it's not a solution; it only does it for one of the integer types. – Justin Jul 20 '17 at 23:47
  • this works for the type requested in the question. BTW, this is the most efficient solution from the compilation efficiency. Well, it has its own drawbacks, like no scoping, but it is lightweight and is straight forward. – Serge Jul 21 '17 at 0:06
  • 1
    The OP ask for a "template function which generates bitmasks in compile-time for integral types", not for a specific type and not for a fixed size type. – max66 Jul 21 '17 at 0:50

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