2
class Human {
    Long humanId;
    String name;
    Long age;
}


class SuperHuman {
    Long superHumanId;
    Long humanId;
    String name;
    Long age;
}

I've two lists. List of humans and List of superHumans. I want to create a single list out of the two making sure that if a human is superhuman, it only appears once in the list using java 8. Is there a neat way to do it? UPDATE: These are different classes i.e. neither extends the other. I want the final list to be of superhumans. If a human already is superhuman, we ignore that human object. If a human is not a superhuman, we convert the human object into the super human object. Ideally I would want to sort them by their age at the end so that I get a list of superhuman sorted by date in descending order.

  • 2
    does superhuman extend human? and yes there is a neat way – XtremeBaumer Jul 21 '17 at 6:37
  • 3
    This could be answered on face value but would be clunky. The real question is why do this? Merging data from similar but overlapping types just suggests bad design. You probably want to make SuperHuman a subclass of Human, have equality of Humans based on humanId equality, and then add everything to a Set<Human>, only creating SuperHumans with the correct class in the first place. – davnicwil Jul 21 '17 at 6:44
  • From your question, it's unclear how Human and SuperHuman are related. Your code tells us the one does not extend the other (which is slightly surprising), but how are they otherwise related? If someone named Alan is a superhuman, how exactly does he appear in both lists? – MC Emperor Jul 21 '17 at 7:46
  • Can you add an concrete example of what the result should be? There are now multiple answers, with a slightly different outcome, because your intentions are not 100% clear – Patrick Jul 21 '17 at 8:08
6

Based on your updated question:

List<Human> humans = ... // init 
List<SuperHuman> superHumans = ... // init

Set<Long> superHumanIds = superHumans.stream()
    .map(SuperHuman::getHumanId)
    .collect(toSet());

humans.stream()
    .filter(human -> superHumanIds.contains(human.getHumanId()))
    .map(this::convert)
    .forEach(superHumans::add);

superHumans.sort(Comparator.comparing(SuperHuman::getAge));

Assuming this class has another method with the following signature:

private Superhuman convert(Human human) {
    // mapping logic
}
  • 1
    I think this solution would only work, if the Superhuman would not have a superhumanId, but rather only the inherited humanId. I mean, not even redeclared in the Superhumanclass – Do Re Jul 21 '17 at 6:55
  • If Human class overrides equals & hashcode methods and only considers humanId in the implementation, instances of Human and its subclass SuperHuman will be equal based on humanId. Therefore, in the set there would be only unique humanId´s – furkan Jul 21 '17 at 8:47
  • Which I think is the inteded behaviour based on the provided description of the OP. But as I stated in my comment below the question, we can't be sure of that... – Patrick Jul 21 '17 at 8:58
  • @furkan Indeed, "overridden in the right way" is a wise choice of words. – MC Emperor Jul 21 '17 at 8:58
  • I updated the question. I should have provided the info that the two objects are not related in any way. – Nick01 Jul 21 '17 at 15:35
2

You do have other suggestions about how your code should be re-factored to make it better, but in case you can't do that, there is a way - via a custom Collector that is not that complicated.

A custom collector also gives you the advantage of actually deciding which entry you want to keep - the one that is already collected or the one that is coming or latest in encounter order wins. It would require some code changes - but it's doable in case you might need it.

 private static <T> Collector<Human, ?, List<Human>> noDupCollector(List<SuperHuman> superHumans) {
    class Acc {

        ArrayList<Long> superIds = superHumans.stream()
                .map(SuperHuman::getHumanId)
                .collect(Collectors.toCollection(ArrayList::new));

        ArrayList<Long> seen = new ArrayList<>();

        ArrayList<Human> noDup = new ArrayList<>();

        void add(Human elem) {
            if (superIds.contains(elem.getHumanId())) {

                if (!seen.contains(elem.getHumanId())) {
                    noDup.add(elem);
                    seen.add(elem.getHumanId());
                }

            } else {
                noDup.add(elem);
            }
        }

        Acc merge(Acc right) {
            noDup.addAll(right.noDup);
            return this;
        }

        public List<Human> finisher() {
            return noDup;
        }

    }
    return Collector.of(Acc::new, Acc::add, Acc::merge, Acc::finisher);
}

Supposing you have these entries:

List<SuperHuman> superHumans = Arrays.asList(
            new SuperHuman(1L, 1L, "Superman"));
    //
    List<Human> humans = Arrays.asList(
            new Human(1L, "Bob"),
            new Human(1L, "Tylor"),
            new Human(2L, "John"));

Doing this:

List<Human> noDup = humans.stream()
            .collect(noDupCollector(superHumans));

System.out.println(noDup); // [Bob, Tylor]
1

Try this.

List<Object> result = Stream.concat(
    humans.stream()
        .filter(h -> !superHumans.stream()
            .anyMatch(s -> h.humanId == s.humanId)),
    superHumans.stream())
    .collect(Collectors.toList());
  • 1
    well this could duplicate humans - and the OP does not want that – Eugene Jul 21 '17 at 6:49
  • @Eugene There is no equals() method in Human class. So result can not duplicate. – saka1029 Jul 21 '17 at 6:53
  • 1
    did you actually try your code? Besides containing duplicates, it will also discard humans that are not superhumans at all - and that should not happen. – Eugene Jul 21 '17 at 7:02
  • There is missing a ! somewhere, and that'll fix the whole code ... well, almost. – MC Emperor Jul 21 '17 at 8:35
0

Suppose neither of the classes inherit the other one. I can imagine you have two lists:

Human alan = new Human(1, "Alan");
Human bertha = new Human(2, "Bertha");
Human carl = new Human(3, "Carl");
Human david = new Human(4, "David");
SuperHuman carlS = new SuperHuman(1, 3, "Carl");
SuperHuman eliseS = new SuperHuman(2, 0, "Elise");

List<Human> humans = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(alan, bertha, carl, david));
List<SuperHuman> superHumans = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(carlS, eliseS));

We see that Carl is listed as a human, and also as a superhuman. Two instances of the very same Carl exist.

List<Object> newList = humans.stream()
    .filter((Human h) -> {
        return !superHumans.stream()
            .anyMatch(s -> s.getHumanId() == h.getHumanId());
    })
    .collect(Collectors.toList());
newList.addAll(superHumans);

This code tries to filter the list of humans, excluding all entries whose humanId exist in the list of superhumans. At last, all superhumans are added.


This design has several problems:

  • Intuitively, the classes are related, but your code says otherwise. The fact that you are trying to merge, suggests the types are related.
  • The classes have overlapping properties (humanId and name) which as well suggest that the classes are related.

The assumption that the classes are related, is definitely not unfounded.

As other commenters suggested, you should redesign the classes:

class Human {
    long id; // The name 'humanId' is redundant, just 'id' is fine
    String name;
}

class SuperHuman extends Human {
    long superHumanId; // I'm not sure why you want this...
}
Human alan = new Human(1, "Alan");
Human bertha = new Human(2, "Bertha");
Human carl = new SuperHuman(3, "Carl");
Human david = new Human(4, "David");
Human elise = new SuperHuman(5, "Elise");

List<Human> people = Arrays.asList(alan, bertha, carl, david, elise);

Then you have one single instance for each person. Would you ever get all superhumans from the list, just use this:

List<Human> superHumans = people.stream()
    .filter((Human t) -> t instanceof SuperHuman)
    .collect(Collectors.toList());

superHumans.forEach(System.out::println); // Carl, Elise
  • I updated the question. I should have provided the info that the two objects are not related in any way. – Nick01 Jul 21 '17 at 15:35

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