17

I try to find a next or prev element of current element. But next() and prev() function can only work in a scope, it can not reach outside. For an example this is what I want to achieve:

<ul id="ul1">
  <li>1</li>
  <li>2</li>
  <li>3</li>
  <li>
    <ul id="ul2">
      <li>4</li>
      <li>
        <ul id="ul3">
          <li>5</li>
          <li>6</li>
        </ul>
      </li>
      <li>7</li>
      <li>8</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>9</li>
</ul>

If current element is ul1, next element is <li>1</li>, prev element is null.

If current element is <li>1</li>, next element is <li>2</li>, prev element is ul1

If current element is <li>8</li>, next element is <li>9</li>, prev element is <li>7</li>

  • and if current element <li>3</li> ? also <li>4</li> ?? – ifaour Dec 23 '10 at 23:18
  • @ifaour - no, it'd be the <li> that's the parent of #ul2 – David Tang Dec 24 '10 at 0:52
14

First of all, this was a really neat problem. Thanks for posting!

I accomplished this with a chained jQuery statement. Only thing is, if you run previous() on the top ul you'll get body. Which I think technically makes sense. However, if this isn't the desired behavior, see my update below.

Usage: next("#ul3") returns <li>5</li>

Next:

function next(selector) {
    var $element = $(selector);

    return $element
        .children(":eq(0)")
        .add($element.next())
        .add($element.parents().filter(function() {
            return $(this).next().length > 0;
        }).next()).first();
}

Previous:

function previous(selector) {
    var $element = $(selector);

    return $element
        .prev().find("*:last")   
        .add($element.parent())    
        .add($element.prev())
        .last();     
}

Update If you want to limit the upper most node previous can be, you could do:

function previous(selector, root) {
    var $element = $(selector);

    return $element
        .prev().find("*:last")   
        .add($element.parent())     
        .add($element.prev())
        .last().not($(root).parent());      
}

http://jsfiddle.net/andrewwhitaker/n89dz/

Another Update: Here's a jQuery plugin for convenience:

(function($) {
    $.fn.domNext = function() {
        return this
            .children(":eq(0)")
            .add(this.next())
            .add(this.parents().filter(function() {
                return $(this).next().length > 0;
            }).next()).first();        
    };

    $.fn.domPrevious = function() {
        return this
            .prev().find("*:last")   
            .add(this.parent())     
            .add(this.prev())
            .last();         
    };
})(jQuery);

Expanded example here: http://jsfiddle.net/andrewwhitaker/KzyAY/

5

What an interesting problem! Sounds like you're flattening the recursive structure of HTML so that it's loop-able - I can see it coming in handy.

You can solve the problem by breaking .next() down into the following cases:

  1. Element has children --> next() is the first child.
  2. Element has no children, and is not the last child --> next() is the same as jQuery's .next()
  3. Element has no children, is last child:
    1. Find closest parent that is not the last child --> next() is that parent's next sibling
    2. If no such parent exists --> next() is null

Code would be (calling it flatNext to preserve original jQuery .next behaviour):

$.fn.flatNext = function () {
   if (this.children().length) return this.children().eq(0);
   if (!this.is(":last-child")) return this.next();
   if (this.closest(":not(:last-child)").length)
       return this.closest(":not(:last-child)").next();
   return $([]); // Return empty jQuery object rather than null
};

And $.fn.flatPrev should follow..

1

Depending on your data set, you could just flatten the whole thing (presuming $.find is stable, which I believe it is), like this:

var eles = [];
$("#ul1").find("li").each(function (e) {
    eles.push(e);
});

The next element after ele[3] is ele[4] regardless of the level of indentation.

Example http://jsfiddle.net/xRpmL/

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.