10

This question already has an answer here:

I was reading some code written in Golang on Github and found a very interesting piece of code. I simplified it to be clear.

func  Insert(docs ...interface{}) (err error) {
    for i := 0; i < 3; i++ {
        err = fmt.Errorf("")
        if err.Error()!="EOF" {
            return
        }
    }
    return 
}

I'm very confused about empty return here... How it works? Does he return nil as error or breaks for loop? I understand that this question looks dummy, but I cannot find any info on this in go docs... Also, I don't understand how we can return err, which is, as I understood, declared somehow in return. Does (err error) means that we already have an error variable available in our func which is used as default return value if none specified? Why then we implicitly make return err at the end of func?

I'll be very gratefull for explanation.

marked as duplicate by Flimzy, Community Jul 24 '17 at 12:33

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15

The function uses a "named" return value.

From the spec on return statements:

The expression list may be empty if the function's result type specifies names for its result parameters. The result parameters act as ordinary local variables and the function may assign values to them as necessary. The "return" statement returns the values of these variables.

Regardless of how they are declared, all the result values are initialized to the zero values for their type upon entry to the function. A "return" statement that specifies results sets the result parameters before any deferred functions are executed.

Using named returns allows you to save some code on manually allocating local variables, and can sometimes clean up messy if/else statements or long lists of return values.

func a()(x []string, err error){
    return
}

is really just shorthand for

func a() ([]string,error){
  var x []string
  var err error
  return x,err
}

Its a bit shorter, and I agree that it may be less obvious.

Named returns are sometimes needed, as it allows things like accessing them inside a deferred function, but the naked return is just syntactic sugar as far as I can tell, and is never strictly required.

One place I see it commonly is in error return cases in functions that have many return values.

if(err != nil){
   return
}
return a,b,c,nil

is easier than

if(err != nil){
   return nil,nil,nil,err
}
return a,b,c,nil

when you have to write it a bunch of times. And you don't have to modify those returns if you change the signature to have additional "real" return values.

Most places I am using them in the codebase I just searched, they definitely seem to be hiding other smells, like overly complex multi-purpose functions, too deep if/else nesting and stuff like that.

  • can you post some example in which this kind of declaration cleans up if's or something like them? For me, this language feature looks like a bad design (i came from c#) – Alex Voskresenskiy Jul 21 '17 at 13:59
  • 2
    I don't have a strong argument for using naked returns, and would usually default to explicit. But I edited in some more considerations. – captncraig Jul 21 '17 at 14:09
  • Thanks a lot for your reply, now i fully understand the problem! :) – Alex Voskresenskiy Jul 21 '17 at 14:20
4

When you have a named return value (err here):

func  Insert(docs ...interface{}) (err error) {

This creates a function-local variable by that name, and if you just call return with no parameters, it returns the local variable. So in this function,

return

Is the same as, and implies,

return err

This is detailed in the tour and in the spec.

  • Okay, but why we use empty return in for and implicitly write return err in the end of func? – Alex Voskresenskiy Jul 21 '17 at 13:52
  • 2
    Absolutely no good reason. It would probably be better to keep them consistent. – Adrian Jul 21 '17 at 13:53
  • 1
    @AlexVoskresenskiy Some good answers to that in this question – captncraig Jul 21 '17 at 13:58
3

Go's return values may be named. If so, they are treated as variables defined at the top of the function.

package main

import "fmt"

func split(sum int) (x, y int) {
    x = sum * 4 / 9
    y = sum - x
   return
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(split(17))
}

https://tour.golang.org/basics/7

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