6

This workaround not works

CREATE FUNCTION json_array_castext(json) RETURNS text[] AS $f$
  SELECT array_agg(x::text) FROM json_array_elements($1) t(x);
$f$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

-- Problem:
SELECT 'hello'='hello';  -- true...
SELECT  (json_array_castext('["hello","world"]'))[1] = 'hello'; -- false!

So, how to obtain real array of text?

PS: with the supposed "first class citizen" JSONb, the same problem.


Edit: after @OtoShavadze good answer (the comment solved!), a manifest for PostgreSQL developers: Why x::text is not a cast? (using pg 9.5.6) and why it not generates an warning or an error?

  • 1
    try json_array_elements_text instead of json_array_elements – Oto Shavadze Jul 21 '17 at 17:19
  • YES! Thanks @OtoShavadze! Please post it as answer, for my formal acceptance (!). I am editing only to make a manifest to PostgreSQL developers ;-) – Peter Krauss Jul 21 '17 at 17:37
5

try json_array_elements_text instead of json_array_elements, and you don't need explicit casting to text (x::text), so you can use:

CREATE or replace FUNCTION json_array_castext(json) RETURNS text[] AS $f$
    SELECT array_agg(x) FROM json_array_elements_text($1) t(x);
$f$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

For your additional question

Why x::text is not a cast?

This is cast and because of this, its not giving any error, but when casting json string to text like this: ::text, postgres adds quotes to value.

Just for testing purposes, lets change your function to original again (as it is in your question) and try:

SELECT  
(json_array_castext('["hello","world"]'))[1] = 'hello',
(json_array_castext('["hello","world"]'))[1],
'hello'

As you see, (json_array_castext('["hello","world"]'))[1] gives "hello" instead of hello. and this was why you got false when comparing those values.

  • Thanks Oto! It is not a critique, please ignore, is only a complement of my manifest :-) In SQL, casting char(N) produces expected text with no quotations; in an embedded language or driver, casting SQL-text produces expected string with no quotations, casting string produces expected SQL-text with no quotations... It is the universal expected behaviour... – Peter Krauss Jul 22 '17 at 0:33
1

For this ugly behaviour of PostgreSQL, there are an ugly cast workaround, the operator #>>'{}':

CREATE or replace FUNCTION json_array_castext(json) RETURNS text[] AS $f$
    SELECT array_agg(x#>>'{}') FROM json_array_elements($1) t(x);
$f$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

SELECT  (json_array_castext('["hello","world"]'))[1] = 'hello'; -- true!
1

Oto's answer was a lifesaver, but it did have one boundary case that had me racking my brain. Due to the lossy nature of the cast, it works perfectly except in the case where you've got an empty json array. In that case you would expect an empty array to be returned, but it actually returns nothing. As a workaround, if you just concatenate the return value with an empty array it will have no affect in cases where there is actually a return, but do the right thing when you've got an empty array. Here's the updated SQL functions (for both json and jsonb) that implement the workaround.

CREATE or replace FUNCTION json_array_casttext(json) RETURNS text[] AS $f$
    SELECT array_agg(x) || ARRAY[]::text[] FROM json_array_elements_text($1) t(x);
$f$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

CREATE or replace FUNCTION jsonb_array_casttext(jsonb) RETURNS text[] AS $f$
    SELECT array_agg(x) || ARRAY[]::text[] FROM jsonb_array_elements_text($1) t(x);
$f$ LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE;

There are a few peculiarities like this one that point to the rough edges at integrating a document database into a mature relational one, but Postgres does an admirable job at handling most of them.

  • Hi @JoelB, good enhance of Oto's solution, for empty case. Your solution is elegant, perhaps the best... But perhaps (need to test perfomance!) a faster solution is SELECT CASE WHEN $1='[]'::jsonb THEN array[]::text[] ELSE (SELECT array_agg(x) FROM etc) END. The same for json but using $1::text='{}'::text. – Peter Krauss Dec 28 '17 at 19:17
  • Oh yeah, it's a total hack and I'm sure your suggestion would be more performant. My main concern was not silently losing data, which this prevents. – Joel B Dec 28 '17 at 19:20
  • 2
    I think coalesce(array_agg(x), array[]::text[]) would be "clearer" (at least to me) than the concatenation. – a_horse_with_no_name Jul 10 '18 at 14:35
  • @a_horse_with_no_name you're exactly right. I keep finding how Postgres has something builtin for every case I could think of. Feel free to edit/update the post with your suggestion. – Joel B Jul 15 '18 at 13:00

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