1

I am attempting to generate a hash value for an object that contains a boost::property_tree (boost::property_tree::basic_ptree<std::basic_string<char>, std::basic_string<char> >). Searching through the boost header files for property tree I cannot find any defined hash_value function for it. Basic example of what I am trying to achieve:

class MyClass{
public:
    friend std::size_t hash_value(const MyClass & obj);
private:
    boost::property_tree m_data;
}

inline std::size_t hash_value(const MyClass & obj){
    std::size_t seed = 0;
    boost::hash_combine(seed,obj.m_data);
    return seed;
}

This code will fail to compile with: "no matching function for call to 'hash_value(const boost::property_tree &)'"

My question: Is hash_value defined for boost::property_tree in some header file I haven't found. If not, what is the boost idiomatic way to hash a property_tree by traversing it?

Should I use use ptree serialization to convert to std::string and hash that, or manually traverse the tree and create a recursive hash?

  • Do not use serialization because it is prone to change presentation/loose information. – sehe Jul 21 '17 at 21:22
1

Just specialize hash<> for ptree:

#include <boost/property_tree/ptree.hpp>
#include <boost/functional/hash.hpp>

namespace boost {
    template<typename Key, typename Data, typename KeyCompare>
    struct hash<boost::property_tree::basic_ptree<Key, Data, KeyCompare> > {
        size_t operator()(boost::property_tree::basic_ptree<Key, Data, KeyCompare> const& pt) const {
            std::size_t seed = 0;
            boost::hash_combine(seed, pt.template get_value<std::string>());
            boost::hash_range(seed, pt.begin(), pt.end());
            return seed;
        }
    };
}

That's enough! Here's a small MyClass that reads from a json-like literal:

#include <boost/property_tree/json_parser.hpp>

class MyClass{
  public:
      MyClass(std::string const& json) {
          std::istringstream iss(json);
          read_json(iss, m_data);
      }
  private:
    boost::property_tree::ptree m_data;

    friend inline std::size_t hash_value(const MyClass& obj){
        std::size_t seed = 0;
        boost::hash_combine(seed, obj.m_data);
        return seed;
    }
};

Now you can test it

Live On Coliru

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    for (std::string const data : {
            R"({"a":[1,2,3],"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"}})",
            R"({"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"},"a":[1,2,3]})",
            R"({ })",
            R"({})",
        })
    {
        MyClass o(data);
        std::cout << "object hash: " << hash_value(o) << " " << data << "\n";
    }
}

Prints:

object hash: 3573231694259656572 {"a":[1,2,3],"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"}}
object hash: 11176663460548092204 {"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"},"a":[1,2,3]}
object hash: 3864292196 { }
object hash: 3864292196 {}

CAUTION: Hash and Equality

For many containers, hash<> assumes a corresponding equality comparator. If they don't match, you get Undefined Behaviour.

You might be tempted to define the hash_range in terms of the ordered (associative) interface of ptree:

boost::hash_range(seed, pt.ordered_begin(), pt.not_found()); // CAUTION

This has the advantage that {"a":1,"b":2} would match {"b":2,"a":1}.

Don't do this, unless you know what you're doing. Specifically, you need to pass a compatible equality comparator to every container/algorithm that use this hash.

If you write it like this, and test using a driver like:

int main() {
    MyClass a{ R"({"a":[1,2,3],"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"}})" },
            b{R"({"b":{"nest":"hello","more":"world"},"a":[1,2,3]})" },
            c{R"({ })" },
            d{R"({})" };

    for (auto& lhs : {a,b,c,d})
    for (auto& rhs : {a,b,c,d})
    {
        std::cout << "hash: " << hash_value(lhs) << " " << hash_value(rhs) << " - equality: " << std::boolalpha << (lhs==rhs) << "\n";
        if ((hash_value(lhs) == hash_value(rhs)) != (lhs==rhs))
            std::cout << " -- MISMATCH\n";
    }
}

It will print:

hash: 10737438301360613971 10737438301360613971 - equality: true
hash: 10737438301360613971 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
 -- MISMATCH
hash: 10737438301360613971 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 10737438301360613971 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 10737438301360613971 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
 -- MISMATCH
hash: 10737438301360613971 10737438301360613971 - equality: true
hash: 10737438301360613971 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 10737438301360613971 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 10737438301360613971 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true

The MISMATCH warnings indicate that equality and hash do not agree.

If you run the test-driver with the original hash (above the fold) it will print:

hash: 3573231694259656572 3573231694259656572 - equality: true
hash: 3573231694259656572 11176663460548092204 - equality: false
hash: 3573231694259656572 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 3573231694259656572 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 11176663460548092204 3573231694259656572 - equality: false
hash: 11176663460548092204 11176663460548092204 - equality: true
hash: 11176663460548092204 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 11176663460548092204 3864292196 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 3573231694259656572 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 11176663460548092204 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 3573231694259656572 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 11176663460548092204 - equality: false
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
hash: 3864292196 3864292196 - equality: true
|improve this answer|||||
  • Just realized you can do with only the ptree specialization (std::pair is taken care of by boost, as opposed to the standard library). – sehe Jul 21 '17 at 21:50
  • I used an implementation based on your answer, and then discovered a bug in it. Returning to your answer I was able to reproduce the bug in your provided example: try it live. The current implementation does not check the values of items in the ptree, only keys. – Carter12s Jul 27 '17 at 15:57
  • @Carter12s you're absolutely right. I - embarrassingly - forgot that nodes can have "content" values other than child nodes. Fixed. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/ba934612afdb7bc1 – sehe Jul 27 '17 at 16:30
  • You are a god of C++! I just figured out the solution myself, but you already beat me to it. Thanks for the help. Got a tip jar? – Carter12s Jul 27 '17 at 16:42

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