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I have a function that needs external parameters and afterwards creates variables that are heavily used inside that function. E.g. the code could look like this:

void abc(const int dim);

void abc(const int dim) {
    double arr[dim] = { 0.0 };
    for (int i = 0; i != dim; ++i)
        arr[i] = i;
    // heavy usage of the arr
}

int main() {
    const int par = 5;
    abc(par);
    return 0;
}

But I am getting a compiler error, because the allocation on the stack needs compile-time constants. When I tried allocating manually on the stack with _malloca, the time performance of the code worsened (compared to the case when I declare the constant par inside the abc() function). And I don't want the array arr to be on the heap, because it is supposed to contain only small amount of values and it is going to get used quite often inside the function. Is there some way to combine the efficiency while keeping the possibility to pass the size parameter of an array to the function?

EDIT: I am using MSVC compiler and I received an error C2131: expression did not evaluate to a constant in VC 2017.

  • 3
    C99 actually supports variable length arrays, which compiler is this? – Groo Jul 22 '17 at 8:46
  • You need to mark it constexpr or use a template argument. – Sombrero Chicken Jul 22 '17 at 8:46
  • 1
    Please pick exactly one programming language. – Antti Haapala Jul 22 '17 at 8:52
  • Does the size change between runs of this function? Have you considered making it a static variable in the function, or allocating it externally and passing it to your function? – immortal Jul 22 '17 at 8:53
  • And you're getting an error - the contents of that error are somewhat relevant to the question... the verbatim contents. – Antti Haapala Jul 22 '17 at 8:53
3

If you're using a modern C compiler, that implements the entire C99, or the C11 with variable-length array extension, this would work, with one little modification:

void abc(const int dim);

void abc(const int dim) {
    double arr[dim];
    for (int i = 0; i != dim; ++i)
        arr[i] = i;
    // heavy usage of the arr
}

int main(void) {
    const int par = 5;
    abc(par);
    return 0;
}

I.e. double arr[dim] would work - it doesn't have a compile-time constant size, but it is enough to know its size at runtime. However, such a VLA cannot be initialized.

Unfortunately MSVC is not a modern C compiler / at MS they don't want to implement the VLA themselves - and I even suspect they're a big part of why the VLA's were made optional in C11, so you'd need to define the array in main then pass a pointer to it to the function abc; or if the size is globally constant, use an actual compile-time constant, i.e. a #define.

However, you're not showing the actual code that you're having performance problems with. It might very well be that the compiler can produce optimized output if it knows the number of iterations - if that is true, then the "globally defined size" might be the only way to get excellent performance.

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Unfortunately the Microsoft Compiler does not support variable length arrays.

If the array is not too large you could allocate by the largest possible size needed and pass a pointer to that stack array and a dimension to the function. This approach could help limit the number of allocations.

Another option is to implement a simple heap allocated global pool for functions of this type to use. The pool would allocate a large continuous chunk on the heap and then you can get a pointer to your reservation in the pool. The benefit of this approach is you will not have to worry about over allocation on the stack causing a segmentation fault (which can happen with variable length arrays).

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