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Can I use .net core with legacy .net framework dlls? The answer seems to be no... but I can only find resources referring to project.json, which doesn't exist anymore.

I created a new .net core library and tried to reference a legacy .net framework DLL. When I tried to call into the DLL, vs2017 complained that I didn't have the Stream object is was looking for.

It suggested I reference either mscorlib.dll or installa Nuget package.

The quick help failed to reference mscorlib.dll. If I manually referenced it, I get the following error:

The type 'TargetFrameworkAttribute' exists in both 'mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089' and 'System.Runtime, Version=4.1.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a' C:\Users...\AppData\Local\Temp.NETCoreApp,Version=v1.1.AssemblyAttributes.cs

The NuGet package is Microsoft.NETFx2.0. The quick help fails to install it. If I run it from the command line:

> PM> install-package microsoft.netfx20   GET
> https://api.nuget.org/v3/registration2-gz/microsoft.netfx20/index.json
> OK
> https://api.nuget.org/v3/registration2-gz/microsoft.netfx20/index.json
> 46ms Restoring packages for ... Install-Package : Package
> Microsoft.NetFX20 1.0.3 is not compatible with netcoreapp1.1
> (.NETCoreApp,Version=v1.1). Package Microsoft.NetFX20 1.0.3 supports:
> net20 (.NETFramework,Version=v2.0)At line:1 char:1
> + install-package microsoft.netfx20
> + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>     + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Install-Package], Exception
>     + FullyQualifiedErrorId : NuGetCmdletUnhandledException,NuGet.PackageManagement.PowerShellCmdlets.InstallPackageCommand
> Install-Package : One or more packages are incompatible with
> .NETCoreApp,Version=v1.1.At line:1 char:1
> + install-package microsoft.netfx20
> + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>     + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Install-Package], Exception
>     + FullyQualifiedErrorId : NuGetCmdletUnhandledException,NuGet.PackageManagement.PowerShellCmdlets.InstallPackageCommand
> Install-Package : Package restore failed. Rolling back package changes
> for .At line:1 char:1
> + install-package microsoft.netfx20
> + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>     + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Install-Package], Exception
>     + FullyQualifiedErrorId : NuGetCmdletUnhandledException,NuGet.PackageManagement.PowerShellCmdlets.InstallPackageCommand
> Time Elapsed: 00:00:00.8035644
0
41

Difficult topic. Generally .NET Framework and .NET Core are incompatible. They target a different set of assemblies (mscorlib vs. System.Runtime) which causes incompatibilities since all usages of types are prefixed with the assembly the type is from.

Starting with .NET Core 2 (currently in preview), you can reference .NET Framework assemblies through an invisible compatibility shim. This allows you to reference the assembly and compile successfully.

It doesn't guarantee though that the application will run successfully, since .NET Core doesn't provide all the APIs from .NET Framework. You'll get PlatformNotSupportedException or MissingTypeException and friends at runtime if thats the case.

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  • So how this 'invisibility' thing connected to .NET Standard? Does what I access in my 'old' DLL need to be in .NET Standard for this 'shim' to work? And with .NET Core 3 they're not breaking this right?! – Simon_Weaver Jan 12 '19 at 5:36
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    @Simon_Weaver It is not connected to .NET Standard. .NETCoreApp is a superset of .NET Standard and if the .NET Framework APIs you're trying to use exists in .NETCoreApp then the .NET Framework API should work on .NET Core. No, there are no plans right now to drop this feature anytime soon. – Suchiman Jan 12 '19 at 11:19
  • 1
    @Suchiman So if the API do exist in .NET Core, it will be compiled and run under Core runtime or CoreCLR instead? – joe Apr 1 '19 at 5:12
  • 1
    @joe Yeah...No..., You create a .NET Core Project and then you can reference dlls / nuget that were built for .NET Framework (long ago). When you run the .NET Core Project, it will attempt to load and execute the .NET Framework dll which works as long as the API exists in core, if the API does not exists, an error is thrown. CoreCLR is the Core runtime btw. – Suchiman Apr 1 '19 at 11:09
  • @Suchiman I mean if all APIs exist, does it mean that all .NET Framework dlls and .net core libraries should be running under CoreCLR, managed by CoreGC. And they should be able to run under linux. Or .net framework dlls will manage its own Runtime and CLR instead of hosting under CoreCLR? – joe Apr 2 '19 at 8:38
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Building on top of Suchiman's answer, the compatibility shim will allow a .NET Core application to reference .NET Framework libraries and succeed at compile time but the .NET Core application may fail at run time if any required underlying .NET Framework libraries are missing.

To improve the chances of success at run time, you can try using the Windows Compatibility Pack. This basically attempts to fill in missing .NET Framework libraries. The downside is that the Windows Compatibility Pack is somewhat specific to Windows so it may affect the cross-platform compatibility of the .NET Core app.

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