So, now we got new PHP7 and we can check if return type is what we want.

For example,

function foo(): bool
{
    $num = 8;
    if (10 === $num) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
foo();

OUTPUT: false

Okey, that was easy? It works like it should, but if return is not what we expect?

function bar(): bool
{
    $num = 10;
    if (10 === $num) {
        return array(['apple', 'banana', 'strawberry']);
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
bar();

OUTPUT: Uncaught TypeError: Return value of foo() must be of the type boolean, array returned

That was very basic and those examples just show how it works.

If we have function like in code example 2, can we check for multiple return types? Like

function bar(): bool || array    <---
{
    $num = 10;
    if (10 === $num) {
        return array(['apple', 'banana', 'strawberry']);
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
bar();

But however this results: FATAL ERROR syntax error, unexpected '||' (T_BOOLEAN_OR), expecting '{' on line number 2

So is it possible to define multiple return types?

  • If you have multiple return types, what's the point of type hinting anyway? As far as I know, it's not a language feature and doesn't really seem useful to implement. If you need the multiple return types, don't try to type hint. If you need to specify there's an error but want to type hint, throw an Exception or use nullable type hints and return null. – Bytewave Jul 23 '17 at 3:33
  • 1
    The feature you're describing was rejected some time ago: wiki.php.net/rfc/union_types – Nathan Dawson Jul 23 '17 at 3:58
up vote 6 down vote accepted

@scott-c-wilson has explained the mechanics of the language rule well.

From a design perspective, having a function that potentially returns different types of result indicates a potential design flaw:

  • If you're returning your result, or otherwise false if something didn't go to plan; you should probably be throwing an exception instead. If the function processing didn't go according to plan; that's an exceptional situation: leverage the fact. I know PHP itself has a habit of returning false if things didn't work, but that's just indicative of poor design - for the same reason - in PHP.

  • If your function returns potentially different things, then it's quite possible it's doing more than one thing, which is bad design in your function. Functions should do one thing. If your function has an if/else with the true/false block handling different chunks of processing (as opposed to just handling exit situations), then this probably indicates you ought to have two functions, not one. Leave it to the calling code to decide which is the one to use.

  • If your function returns two different object types which then can be used in a similar fashion in the calling code (ie: there's no if this: do that; else do this other thing in the calling code), this could indicate you ought to be returning an interface, not a concrete implementation.

  • there will possibly be legit situations where returning different types is actually the best thing to do. If so: all good. But that's where the benefit of using a loosely typed language comes in: just don't specify the return type of the function. But... that said... the situation probably isn't legit, so work through the preceding design considerations first to determine if you really do have one of these real edge cases where returning different types is warranted.

Is it possible to define multiple return types?

No. That's the point! Multiple return types are confusing and mean you need to do extra non-intuitive checking (I'm looking at you, "===").

From the manual: "...return type declarations specify the type of the value that will be returned from a function." (emphasis mine)

The type, not the types.

Union types should exist, but they don't.

You can use ?int for example, but then it will expect NULL or INT.

The Answer:

It's not possible. There isn't any way natively through PHP.

However, you can omit the 'Type Declaration' which is ONLY there for strict typing. Just use DocBlocks @return bool|string for example. The IDE will recognize it, but PHP won't care.

http://docs.phpdoc.org/references/phpdoc/tags/return.html

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