2

One question I have been wondering is, should I call context.SaveChanges() explicitly or let it be under Dispose().

Approach 1: Auto-Save

    public virtual void Dispose()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
        context.Dispose();
    }

Let's say we add user into UserRepository (or using dependency injection)

  using (var repo = new UserRepository())
  {
       repo.Add(user);
  }

Approach 2: explicit save

    public virtual void SaveChanges()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public virtual void Dispose()
    {
        context.Dispose();
    }

Let's say we add user into UserRepository (or using dependency injection)

  using (var repo = new UserRepository())
  {
       repo.Add(user);
       repo.SaveChanges();
  }

So the question I have is: the Auto-Save produces cleaner code, but how expensive is the operation? Which is the better approach?

  • 4
    Surely you want to be clear in your application at which point in time you want to save the data? You need to be clear with your intent. It may look cleaner - only because of the one additional line of code. Maybe you want to cancel out any changes - but in Dispose - you are automatically opted in? Personally I find it cleaner to explicitly call save. Alternatively introduce another layer of abstraction around the context to "auto save"? – Andez Jul 23 '17 at 19:43
  • 5
    Your forget an important aspect: scope. All changes written to a db is wrapped in a transaction. If the call fails you have to recover because the context is in an invalid state. Depending on how many independent changes you have when you finally decide to call Dispose this might not be optimal. Also, you really want to handle database / EF exceptions in the dispose method? I certainly wouldn't expect such kind of logic to take place during a dispose. – Peter Bons Jul 23 '17 at 19:50
  • 2
    Calling SaveChanges in Dispose() is misleading, I would not recommend this. You force user of your repository to only save on dispose. In terms of efficiency, just perform time trial. – one_mile_run Jul 23 '17 at 19:55
  • 1
    Dispose should only do things related to disposal. Saving is not part of that. SaveChanges is an instruction to take things from memory and save them to underlying storage (db). How expensive? Depends on how many things you are saving and how heavy they are etc. In other words it depends. – CodingYoshi Jul 23 '17 at 20:00
  • 1
    it is not necessarily clean, because you are not separating your concerns. Dispose() should only dispose of the context, while SaveChanges() should only do things necessary for saving the data. Regarding your question: SaveChanges() performance is dependant on the number of objects in your context and the speed of your connection. the fewer objects in your context - no matter which state (and therefore, the shorter-lived your context is) the shorter will be the time SaveChanges() takes until completion with either an exception or success. – DevilSuichiro Jul 24 '17 at 10:02
0

I don't know the details, but I doubt you want to be calling SaveChanges when performing a read only query, for example, and what you've shown would call SaveChanges in all cases.

I do write something similar, so that I can make a quick and easy write to the database, but you shouldn't mingle SaveChanges into the Dispose method itself, that's definitely bad.

public static void UseAndSave(
   Action<Context> pAction
) {
   using (var context = new Context()) {
      pAction(context);
      context.SaveChanges();
   }
}

...

Context.UseAndSave(context => context.Users.Add(user));

(Can also write a version that takes a Func)

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