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My issue is I keep getting this error using entity framework code first "Additional information: Introducing FOREIGN KEY constraint 'FK_dbo.Sets_dbo.ExerciseStats_ExerciseStatId' on table 'Sets' may cause cycles or multiple cascade paths. Specify ON DELETE NO ACTION or ON UPDATE NO ACTION, or modify other FOREIGN KEY constraints."

My tables are: workouts, exerciseStats, sets

public class Workout
    {
    [Key]
    public int WorkoutId { get; set; }
    public string UserId { get; set; }
    [Display(Name = "Workout Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime? Date { get; set; }
    public List<ExerciseStats> Exercises { get; set; }

    public bool IsBaseWorkout { get; set; }

    }

public class ExerciseStats
    {
    [Key]
    public int ExerciseStatsId { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int ExerciseId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("ExerciseId")]
    public Exercise Exercise { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int WorkoutId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("WorkoutId")]
    public Workout Workout { get; set; }

    public int DesiredSetId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("DesiredSetId")]
    public Set DesiredSet { get; set; }
    public int DesiredSetCount { get; set; }
    public List<Set> ActualSets { get; set; }


   }

public class Set
{

    [Key]
    public int SetId { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int ExerciseStatId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("ExerciseStatId")]
    public ExerciseStats ExerciseStat { get; set; }
    public float? WeightInKg { get; set; }
    public int? Reps { get; set; }
    public float? Minutes { get; set; }
}

I've been looking at the code for a while and can not seem to identify where the problem is occurring. I have tried to disable cascade delete using this code:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<ExerciseStats>()
        .HasMany(p => p.ActualSets)
        .WithRequired()
        .HasForeignKey(c => c.ExerciseStatId)
        .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
    }

This resulted in this error "Additional information: Unable to determine the principal end of an association between the types 'GymDiaryCodeFirst.Models.Set' and 'GymDiaryCodeFirst.Models.ExerciseStats'. The principal end of this association must be explicitly configured using either the relationship fluent API or data annotations."

Which doesn't make sense to me as I have used the annotations on the required properties.

What I am trying to achieve is a sets table which when data is deleted doesn't effect the exerciseStats table or any other table for that matter. Also the exerciseStats class contains a property called desiredSet which also appears in the sets table.

Been trying to figure this out all sunday :( Thanks for any help guys.

  • Displaying the columns and keys of all your tables would make this easier to diagnose. SQL Server is complaining that there are two foreign key pathways from table Sets to table ExerciseStats, one direct, one probably indirect, though I can't see the latter from your code. This might be a defect in your design, though it is definitely a defect in SQL Server that it can't cascade through multiple pathways. – rd_nielsen Jul 24 '17 at 1:52
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I don't know if the following will provide you with your desired design, but certainly it'll solve your actual issue:

Change your mapping to:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<ExerciseStats>()
        .HasMany(p => p.ActualSets)
        .WithRequired(x => x.ExerciseStat) //<-- Set the principal explicitly
        .HasForeignKey(c => c.ExerciseStatId)
        .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
}

Note that as per the error message requires, we're now explicitly configuring the principal end of the relationship.

In your current code, my guess is that leaving the call with no arguments is causing EF to generate a different FK property to DB and so, the code you have written in order to avoid multiple cascade paths it's neither taking any effect nor making any difference.

UPDATE: As per your comment, and as I mentioned in mine, I think this is a problem with your design. I'll try to provide some more details here:

If you see your ExerciseStat entity has a required Set. You can tell this by the non-nullable property

public int DesiredSetId { get; set; }

At the same time, your Set entity, requires also an ExerciseStat:

public int ExerciseStatId { get; set; }

This will make impossible to add one Workout to DB because you need one entity of set to add an ExerciseStat and also the other way around.

One possible solution would be to make one of your Required properties as Optional (make the field nullable):

public int? DesiredSetId { get; set; }

This will allow you to insert first the principal entity and then using the generated identity value create the dependent one.

Hope this helps!

  • unfortunately, this didn't seem to solve the general issue. Now I just get a different error "Unable to determine a valid ordering for dependent operations. Dependencies may exist due to foreign key constraints, model requirements, or store-generated values.". – Dylan Riley Jul 26 '17 at 20:19
  • @DylanRiley that's why I commented about "your desired design". You're facing issues because the relationship between both entities is required on DB so you need one ExceriseStat created before insert a new set and also need a set created before add an ExersiceStat, so you end up with no way to add items to the DB. This is a flaw in your DB design. – Karel Tamayo Jul 26 '17 at 20:55

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