6

This indentation works fine:

match 5 with
| k when k < 0 ->
  "value is negative"
| k -> "value is non-negative"
|> printfn "%s"

but this does not:

match 5 with
| k when k < 0 ->
  "value is negative"
| k ->
  "value is non-negative"
|> printfn "%s"

Which F# indentation rule is at play?

6

This is a combination of indentation under match and special case for operators.

First, under match, the body of each case can start as far left as the vertical line. For example, this works:

match 5 with
| x ->
"some value"

Second, there is a special offset rule for operators that appear at the beginning of a new line: such operators can be to the left of the previous line up to the width of the operator plus one. For example, these all work identically:

let x =
    "abc"
    |> printf "%s"

let y =
       "abc"
    |> printf "%s"

let z =
 "abc"
    |> printf "%s"

So, in your second example, the second case of the match includes the printfn line, because the forward pipe operator is within the acceptable tolerance to the left from the beginning of the first line.

enter image description here

If you move the string "value is non-negative" just two spaces to the right, the forward pipe won't be within the tolerance anymore, and so the printfn line will be interpreted as being outside the match.

match 5 with
| k when k < 0 ->
  "value is negative"
| k ->
    "value is non-negative"
|> printfn "%s"

In your first example, it is moved 5 spaces to the right, so that works too.

  • 6
    This is, accidentally, a good argument for indenting by 4 spaces routinely: because indenting by 2 spaces will often run into this problem, but indenting by 4 spaces can only run into this problem if the operator on the next line is at least three characters long, such as >=>. Not that 4-space indentation will be entirely free of the problem: operators like >=> and >>= are in common use, after all. But they're far less common than |>, which causes problems with 2-space indentation but not with 4. – rmunn Jul 24 '17 at 4:30
  • Has anyone ever seen code written in the "de-indented operators" style that this rule allows? I've only ever seen it causing problems. – Tarmil Jul 25 '17 at 8:43
  • @Tarmil it works really well for applying operators between multiple arguments of equal importance. Imagine a sum of ten expressions, where each expression is long enough to be in its own line. You'd want to align the expressions directly under each other to reflect the fact that they're all equal, no one is more important than the others. – Fyodor Soikin Jul 25 '17 at 13:08
  • Yeah I see what they could be used for; I've just never seen code that actually uses this style. – Tarmil Jul 25 '17 at 14:44

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