123

I have a Data Frame column with numeric values:

df['percentage'].head()
46.5
44.2
100.0
42.12

I want to see the column as bin counts:

bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100]

How can I get the result as bins with their value counts?

[0, 1] bin amount
[1, 5] etc 
[5, 10] etc 
......
232

You can use pandas.cut:

bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100]
df['binned'] = pd.cut(df['percentage'], bins)
print (df)
   percentage     binned
0       46.50   (25, 50]
1       44.20   (25, 50]
2      100.00  (50, 100]
3       42.12   (25, 50]

bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100]
labels = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
df['binned'] = pd.cut(df['percentage'], bins=bins, labels=labels)
print (df)
   percentage binned
0       46.50      5
1       44.20      5
2      100.00      6
3       42.12      5

Or numpy.searchsorted:

bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100]
df['binned'] = np.searchsorted(bins, df['percentage'].values)
print (df)
   percentage  binned
0       46.50       5
1       44.20       5
2      100.00       6
3       42.12       5

...and then value_counts or groupby and aggregate size:

s = pd.cut(df['percentage'], bins=bins).value_counts()
print (s)
(25, 50]     3
(50, 100]    1
(10, 25]     0
(5, 10]      0
(1, 5]       0
(0, 1]       0
Name: percentage, dtype: int64

s = df.groupby(pd.cut(df['percentage'], bins=bins)).size()
print (s)
percentage
(0, 1]       0
(1, 5]       0
(5, 10]      0
(10, 25]     0
(25, 50]     3
(50, 100]    1
dtype: int64

By default cut return categorical.

Series methods like Series.value_counts() will use all categories, even if some categories are not present in the data, operations in categorical.

Is this answer outdated?
|
5
  • without bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100], can I just say create 5 bins and it will cut it by average cut? for example, i have 110 records, i want to cut them into 5 bins with 22 records in each bin. – qqqwww May 30 '18 at 18:38
  • 2
    @qqqwww - NOt sure if understand, do you think qcut? link – jezrael May 30 '18 at 18:41
  • @qqqwww to do that, pd.cut example in its page shows it : pd.cut(np.array([1, 7, 5, 4, 6, 3]), 3) will cut the array into 3 equal parts. – Ayan Mitra Jul 21 '20 at 12:22
  • @jezreal can you suggest how to compute the mean of each bins also ? – Ayan Mitra Jul 21 '20 at 12:47
  • 1
    @AyanMitra - Do you think df.groupby(pd.cut(df['percentage'], bins=bins)).mean() ? – jezrael Jul 21 '20 at 12:48
13

Using numba module for speed up.

On big datasets (500k >) pd.cut can be quite slow for binning data.

I wrote my own function in numba with just in time compilation, which is roughly 6x faster:

from numba import njit

@njit
def cut(arr):
    bins = np.empty(arr.shape[0])
    for idx, x in enumerate(arr):
        if (x >= 0) & (x < 1):
            bins[idx] = 1
        elif (x >= 1) & (x < 5):
            bins[idx] = 2
        elif (x >= 5) & (x < 10):
            bins[idx] = 3
        elif (x >= 10) & (x < 25):
            bins[idx] = 4
        elif (x >= 25) & (x < 50):
            bins[idx] = 5
        elif (x >= 50) & (x < 100):
            bins[idx] = 6
        else:
            bins[idx] = 7
            
    return bins
cut(df['percentage'].to_numpy())

# array([5., 5., 7., 5.])

Optional: you can also map it to bins as strings:

a = cut(df['percentage'].to_numpy())

conversion_dict = {1: 'bin1',
                   2: 'bin2',
                   3: 'bin3',
                   4: 'bin4',
                   5: 'bin5',
                   6: 'bin6',
                   7: 'bin7'}

bins = list(map(conversion_dict.get, a))

# ['bin5', 'bin5', 'bin7', 'bin5']

Speed comparison:

# create dataframe of 8 million rows for testing
dfbig = pd.concat([df]*2000000, ignore_index=True)

dfbig.shape

# (8000000, 1)
%%timeit
cut(dfbig['percentage'].to_numpy())

# 38 ms ± 616 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
%%timeit
bins = [0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100]
labels = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
pd.cut(dfbig['percentage'], bins=bins, labels=labels)

# 215 ms ± 9.76 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
Is this answer outdated?
|

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.