I always use this method to easily read the content of a file. Is it efficient enough? Is 1024 good for the buffer size?

public static String read(File file) {
    FileInputStream stream = null;
    StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();

    try {
        stream = new FileInputStream(file);
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    }

    FileChannel channel = stream.getChannel();
    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);

    try {
        while (channel.read(buffer) != -1) {
            buffer.flip();

            while (buffer.hasRemaining()) {
                str.append((char) buffer.get());
            }

            buffer.rewind();
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
    } finally {
        try {
            channel.close();
            stream.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }

    return str.toString();
}
  • 7
    I'm not commenting on efficiency, but the swallowing of exceptions is a definite no-no, IMHO. Imagine that a FileNotFoundException occurs, then stream.getChannel() causes a NPE to be thrown. – Bart Kiers Dec 24 '10 at 17:40
  • Testing if the buffer size is ok, is merely a matter of testing, right? What happens if you make if 512, or 2048? – GolezTrol Dec 24 '10 at 17:46
  • 1
    How are we supposed to know whether this method is fast enough for your purposes? – meriton Dec 24 '10 at 17:49
  • 1
    In terms of efficiency: Measure. Find a metric you care about (in this case, perhaps "what is the wall clock time to slurp a file into a charsequence?"), measure it to some level of statistical significance, and then ask whether your implementation meets your performance goals or not. If it matters, find a way to measure it. – andersoj Dec 24 '10 at 18:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may find that this is fast enough.

String text = FileUtils.readFileToString(file);

AFAIK, this uses the default buffer size of 8K. However I have found larger sizes such as 64K can make a slight difference.

I would always look to FileUtils http://commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/org/apache/commons/io/FileUtils.html to see if they had a method. In this case I would use readFileToString(File) http://commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/org/apache/commons/io/FileUtils.html#readFileToString%28java.io.File%29

They have already dealt with almost all the problem cases...

Try the following, it should work (well):

public static String read(File file)
{
    StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();

    BufferedReader in = null;

    String line = null;

    try
    {
        in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));

        while ((line = in.readLine()) != null)
           str.append(line);

        in.close();
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return str.toString();
}
  • 1
    I think your use of .available() may be incorrect. That method returns the number of bytes (likely to be) available without blocking the thread; it's not reliable as an indication of the bytes remaining in the stream. – andersoj Dec 24 '10 at 17:50
  • 1
    @andersoj: I believe you are right. I've reworked my solution. I hope it's simpler to understand. Thanks. – Bernard Dec 24 '10 at 18:10
  • It's not an indication of the bytes remaining in the stream. It says so explicitly in the Javadoc. – user207421 Jan 10 '11 at 3:26

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.