5

I want to write an abstract method to be overridden by child classes, and what the method does is return an expression to be subsequently used in LINQ OrderBy(). Something like this:

Note: Message inherits from Notes class, and MyModel inherits from MsgModel.

public class Notes
{
    // abstract definition; using object so that I can (I hope) order by int, string, etc.
    public abstract Expression<Func<MsgModel, object>> OrderByField();
    // ...

    private string GetOrderByFieldName()
    {
        // I am not sure how to write this
        // This is my problem 2. Please see below for problem 1 :-(

        var lambda = OrderByField() as LambdaExpression;

        MemberExpression member = lambda.Body as MemberExpression;

        PropertyInfo propInfo = member.Member as PropertyInfo;

        return propInfo.Name;
    }
}

public class Message : Notes
{
    // second type parameter is object because I don't know the type
    // of the orderby field beforehand
    public override Expression<Func<MyModel, object>> OrderByField()
    {
        return m => m.item_no;
    }
}

Now if I try to order by this way:

var orderedQuery = myQueryable.OrderBy(OrderByField());

I get this error:

'Unable to cast the type 'System.Int32' to type 'System.Object'. LINQ to Entities only supports casting EDM primitive or enumeration types.'

I can rightaway say that type parameter object is the cause of the problem. So, when I change the type parameter to int, it works fine as long as I am ordering by an int field (e.g. the field item_no).

Q1. How can I get this to work? Surely, I can use a string property OrderByField instead of that expression-returning method and order by it, probably by writing some extension method for IQueryable (maybe using this great answer). But I want to have more intellisense while setting the order by.

Q2. How can I get the name of the order by column from the expression returned by the method OrderByField(). Obviously what I have tried with doesn't work. The member always gets null.


Edit: I have made some changes to the type parameters of the methods. Sorry for not doing it the first time.

  • 1
    Can you not make Notes generic in the data type it will return from that expression? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 24 '17 at 9:49
  • @Damien I am not sure I understood properly what you meant :-( Can you please be a little more specific? – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jul 24 '17 at 9:50
  • If you are meaning this Expression<Func<MsgModel, T>> OrderByField<T>(), then I get this error: Cannot convert lambda expression to intended delegate type because some of the return types in the block are not implicitly convertible to the delegate return type – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jul 24 '17 at 9:55
  • Well, you can define it that way (Expression<Func<Notes, object>>), but you can't use it directly in OrderBy. And if you need intellisense for OrderBy, then why not using OrderBy itself? – Ivan Stoev Jul 24 '17 at 10:02
  • 1
    My point was that it shouldn't be modelled as abstract Expression<Func<...>>, but abstract Order method, for instance public abstract IOrderedQueryable<MsgModel> Order(IQueryable<MsgModel> source); with implementations like return source.OrderBy(m => m.item_no); – Ivan Stoev Jul 24 '17 at 10:35
5

Apparently the Expression<Func<T, object>> is not equivalent of Expression<Func<T, K>>, hence cannot be used as direct replacement of the later required by Queryable.OrderBy<T, K> and similar methods.

Still it's possible to make it work with the help of Expression class by creating a non generic LambdaExpression via Expression.Lambda method and dynamically emitting a call to the corresponding Queryable method.

Here is all that encapsulated in a custom extension methods (a modified version of my answer to How to use a string to create a EF order by expression?):

public static partial class QueryableExtensions
{
    public static IOrderedQueryable<T> OrderBy<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector)
    {
        return source.OrderBy(keySelector, "OrderBy");
    }
    public static IOrderedQueryable<T> OrderByDescending<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector)
    {
        return source.OrderBy(keySelector, "OrderByDescending");
    }
    public static IOrderedQueryable<T> ThenBy<T>(this IOrderedQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector)
    {
        return source.OrderBy(keySelector, "ThenBy");
    }
    public static IOrderedQueryable<T> ThenByDescending<T>(this IOrderedQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector)
    {
        return source.OrderBy(keySelector, "ThenByDescending");
    }
    private static IOrderedQueryable<T> OrderBy<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, object>> keySelector, string method)
    {
        var parameter = keySelector.Parameters[0];
        var body = keySelector.Body;
        if (body.NodeType == ExpressionType.Convert)
            body = ((UnaryExpression)body).Operand;
        var selector = Expression.Lambda(body, parameter);
        var methodCall = Expression.Call(
            typeof(Queryable), method, new[] { parameter.Type, body.Type },
            source.Expression, Expression.Quote(selector));
        return (IOrderedQueryable<T>)source.Provider.CreateQuery(methodCall);
    }
}

One important detail here is that Expression<Func<T, object>> introduces Expression.Convert for value type returning expressions, so it needs to be stripped from the actual lambda body, which is accomplished with the following part of the code:

var body = keySelector.Body;
if (body.NodeType == ExpressionType.Convert)
    body = ((UnaryExpression)body).Operand;
| improve this answer | |
2

You need a couple of generic types for your Notes class. The first is so you can derive from it and still allow the expression to filter on the derived class. The second is to specify the type of the property you wish to use to order by. For example:

public abstract class Notes<T, TProperty> where T : Notes<T, TProperty>
{
    public abstract Expression<Func<T, TProperty>> OrderByField();

    public string GetOrderByFieldName()
    {
        //snip
    }
}

public class Message : Notes<Message, int>
{
    public int item_no { get; set; }

    public override Expression<Func<Message, int>> OrderByField()
    {
        return m => m.item_no;
    }
}

This should also allow the GetOrderByFieldName method to work.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for your answer, but my project structure doesn't allow me to create a number of generic types for Notes class, so much so that if your solution is indeed the only solution, then I may need to look for workarounds for GetOrderByFieldName method implementation. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jul 24 '17 at 11:17
  • 1
    Without a generic type, your code wouldn't even compile. – DavidG Jul 24 '17 at 11:18
  • Then I guess I am going to have look for some plan B for GetOrderByFieldName. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jul 24 '17 at 11:20
  • It's not just that, but you can't override in the Message class with a different type for OrderByField. – DavidG Jul 24 '17 at 11:21
  • 1
    Before I saw your answer, I was thinking if there is a way to define a pack of abstract OrderBy methods in the base class with different type parameters, but a child class would be required to override just one of the pack, depending on the type of the order by field it is going to use, which is obviously impossible, and I know I sound stupid! The idea of generic base class didn't hit me, until I saw your answer. – Sнаđошƒаӽ Jul 24 '17 at 11:27
1

Here's a solution that does (almost) not use reflection or expression stuff: It exploits the fact that the ordering LINQ functions have just one generic type in their result.

1st, create an interface (only one generic parameter) and an implementation (with two generic parameters):

public interface ISortCrit<TSource>
{
    string SortFieldName { get; }

    IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeOrderBy(IEnumerable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeOrderByDescending(IEnumerable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeThenBy(IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeThenByDescending(IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source);

    IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeOrderBy(IQueryable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeOrderByDescending(IQueryable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeThenBy(IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source);
    IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeThenByDescending(IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source);
}

public class SortCrit<TSource, TSort> : ISortCrit<TSource>
{
    private readonly Expression<Func<TSource, TSort>> _sortExpression;
    private readonly Lazy<Func<TSource, TSort>> _sortDelegate;
    private readonly Lazy<string> _sortFieldName;

    public SortCrit(Expression<Func<TSource, TSort>> sortExpression)
    {
        _sortExpression = sortExpression;
        _sortDelegate = new Lazy<Func<TSource, TSort>>(() => sortExpression.Compile());
        _sortFieldName = new Lazy<string>(() => ((MemberExpression)sortExpression.Body).Member.Name);
    }

    public string SortFieldName => _sortFieldName.Value;

    public IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeOrderBy(IEnumerable<TSource> source) => source.OrderBy(_sortDelegate.Value);
    public IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeOrderByDescending(IEnumerable<TSource> source) => source.OrderByDescending(_sortDelegate.Value);
    public IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeThenBy(IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source) => source.ThenBy(_sortDelegate.Value);
    public IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> MakeThenByDescending(IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source) => source.ThenBy(_sortDelegate.Value);

    public IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeOrderBy(IQueryable<TSource> source) => source.OrderBy(_sortExpression);
    public IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeOrderByDescending(IQueryable<TSource> source) => source.OrderByDescending(_sortExpression);
    public IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeThenBy(IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source) => source.ThenBy(_sortExpression);
    public IOrderedQueryable<TSource> MakeThenByDescending(IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source) => source.ThenByDescending(_sortExpression);
}

2nd some conveniance extensions:

public static class SortCrit
{
    public static ISortCrit<TSource> Create<TSource, TSort>(Expression<Func<TSource, TSort>> sortExpression) => new SortCrit<TSource, TSort>(sortExpression);

    public static IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeOrderBy(source);
    public static IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> OrderByDescending<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeOrderByDescending(source);
    public static IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> ThenBy<TSource>(this IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeThenBy(source);
    public static IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> ThenByDescending<TSource>(this IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeThenByDescending(source);

    public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeOrderBy(source);
    public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> OrderByDescending<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeOrderByDescending(source);
    public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> ThenBy<TSource>(this IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeThenBy(source);
    public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> ThenByDescending<TSource>(this IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source, ISortCrit<TSource> crit) => crit.MakeThenByDescending(source);
}

Usage:

var messageCrit = SortCrit.Create((Message m) => m.ItemNo);

IEnumerable<Message> msgs = ...;
msgs.OrderBy(messageCrit);
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