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Taking an input as hex string and then converting it to char string in C. The hex string can contain 0x00 which translates to an 0 in Ascii when converted. This terminates the string. I have to store the value in an char string because the API uses that.
My code so far:

int hex_to_int(unsigned char c) {
    int first =0;
    int second =0;
    int result=0;
    if(c>=97 && c<=102)
        c-=32;
    first=c / 16 - 3;
    second =c % 16;
    result = first*10 + second;
    if(result > 9) result--;
        return result;
}
unsigned char hex_to_ascii(unsigned char c, unsigned char d){
    unsigned char a='0';
    int high = hex_to_int(c) * 16;
    int low = hex_to_int(d);
    a= high+low;
    return a;
}
unsigned char* HextoString(unsigned char *st){
    int length = strlen((const char*)st);
    unsigned char* result=(unsigned char*)malloc(length/2+1);
    unsigned char arr[500];
    int i;
    unsigned char buf = 0;
    int j=0;
    for(i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        if(i % 2 != 0)
    {
        arr[j++]=(unsigned char)hex_to_ascii(buf, st[i]);
    }
    else
    {
         buf = st[i];
    }
    }
    arr[length/2+1]='\0';
    memcpy(result,arr,length/2+1);
    return result;
}
  • 6
    There's nothing to stop you putting a null byte in a string, but any function that expects a string (strlen(), printf() etc.) will see it as an end marker. – squeamish ossifrage Jul 24 '17 at 12:40
  • Worth checking the api documentation about how it expects those hex strings to be converted. – Display name Jul 24 '17 at 12:41
  • 3
    Aren't you mixing up the NUL character (ASCII value = 0) and the '0' character (ASCII value = 48)? Show your code. Without the code the question is unclear. – Jabberwocky Jul 24 '17 at 12:45
  • 1
    NUL, character, and string are text concepts. If you aren't dealing with text—it seems like you aren't—just stop calling it a string and stop using text functions. If you have a byte buffer (even if typed char *), keep track of the capacity and the current length. Please edit your question with more context to get better answers. – Tom Blodget Jul 24 '17 at 16:11
  • You can store 48 which is ASCII value for 0. – RAJ KUMAR MISHRA Jul 24 '17 at 17:59
6

You can store any values in a char array. But if you want to store a value of 0x00, you cannot use the string functions on this array. So you have to use an integer variable to store the length of the data you want to store. You can then write functions that use this integer.

  • if i return the string from a function will it cut the string because of the null character.What to do in that case? – dennis menice Jul 24 '17 at 12:51
  • 2
    @dennismenice: Nothing will be cutted it is just an array of characters, as long as you're not using C-string function that doesn't happen... Show some code so that it's clear what you mean. – Andre Kampling Jul 24 '17 at 12:52
  • @dennismenice: It's only 'cut' in the sense that functions that expect strings as inputs will ignore everything after the NUL character. When you return the value, you're returning a pointer to memory. Nothing is 'cut' when the function returns. – cdo256 Jul 24 '17 at 12:54
  • @AndreKampling edited.Please suggest.It cuts the string for 00 in hex – dennis menice Jul 25 '17 at 6:55
0

As you provided more information now, I can tell you that your function doesn't cut anything as it loops through the whole C-string which you provided for example as input "0a12345600a0020b12". The "problem" is that if you want to get the length (strlen()) of the output string after the conversion for example then it will stop at '\0' and you will get a "wrong" length in terms of your original input string.

It is exacly like it's written in the answer of Xaver save the length information and the string to work with that length and not the one you would get by the C-string functions like strlen().

To show that and in order to provide a right length information I've added a struct definition to your code that defines a string type consisting of a size_t len and an unsigned char* str called HexString. With the additional length information you can handle a 0 byte. Also I made little changes to your code, e.g. you don't need that character buffer arr on the stack.

With your input: "0a12345600a0020b12"
the following output you will see: <0a> <12> <34> <56> <00> <a0> <02> <0b> <12> <00>
if you print the C-string hexadecimal every single character. The last <00> is the null termination.

Look here on ideone for a live example.

The code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct
{
   size_t         len; /* C-string length + '\0' */
   unsigned char* str;
} HexString;

int hex_to_int(unsigned char c)
{
   int first =0;
   int second =0;
   int result=0;
   if (c >= 97 && c <= 102) /* 97 = 'a'; 102 = 'f' */
      c -= 32;
   first  = c / 16 - 3;
   second = c % 16;
   result = first * 10 + second;
   if (result > 9) result--;
   return result;
}

unsigned char hex_to_ascii(unsigned char c, unsigned char d)
{
   unsigned char a = '0';
   int high = hex_to_int(c) * 16;
   int low  = hex_to_int(d);
   a = high + low;
   return a;
}

HexString HextoString(const char* const st)
{
   HexString result;
   size_t length = strlen(st);
   result.len = length/2+1;
   result.str = malloc(length/2+1);
   size_t i;
   size_t j = 0;
   unsigned char buf = 0;
   for (i = 0; i < length; i++)
   {
      if (i % 2 != 0)
      {
         result.str[j++] = hex_to_ascii(buf, st[i]);
      }
      else
      {
         buf = (unsigned char)st[i];
      }
   }
   result.str[length/2+1] = '\0';
   return result;
}

int main()
{
   size_t i;
   HexString hexString = HextoString("0a12345600a0020b12");
   for (i = 0; i < hexString.len; ++i)
   {
      printf("<%02x> ", hexString.str[i]);
   }

   free(hexString.str);

   return 0;
}
  • Hi @dennismenice if this or any answer has solved your question please consider accepting it by clicking the check-mark. This indicates to the wider community that you've found a solution and gives some reputation to both the answerer and yourself. There is no obligation to do this. – Andre Kampling Jul 28 '17 at 6:46

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