1

I've read several posts about atomic and write a demo to verify the thread safe, like this

@property(atomic,assign) NSInteger sum;

// then do this

for (NSInteger i = 0; i<1000; i++) {
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT);
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
        self.sum++;
    });

}

make a property "sum" as an atomic property; and start 1000 concurrency threads to add one ;

I though the result will be 1000, but its not, if I add a NSLock to wrap the self.sum++ , the result is 1000;

anyone help me to explain this ?

  • What result do you get? – rmaddy Jul 25 '17 at 6:36
  • And why do you create the queue inside the loop instead of before the loop? – rmaddy Jul 25 '17 at 6:37
  • 997 998 996 not 1000, in the loop to make 1000 threads – NickYu Jul 25 '17 at 6:39
  • Move the line dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create... to before the loop. You must not create a new queue for each loop iteration. Only the dispatch_async should be inside the loop. – rmaddy Jul 25 '17 at 6:42
4

There are several layers to this.

First, a declared property is mostly just a shortcut to declaring accessor methods. Compiler synthesis of the property, which happens by default if you don't provide your own implementation, defines those methods and an instance variable to back the property.

So, this:

@property(atomic,assign) NSInteger sum;

is basically just this:

- (NSInteger) sum;
- (void) setSum:(NSInteger)value;

Synthesis of the property produces an instance variable and implementations of those methods:

@implementation ...
{
    NSUInteger _sum;
}

- (NSInteger) sum
{
    // ...
}
- (void) setSum:(NSInteger)value
{
    // ...
}

For an atomic property, the implementations of -sum and -setSum: are each guaranteed to operate such that neither can appear to interrupt the other. A call to -sum that happens "simultaneously" with a call to -setSum: will either return the value before -setSum: or the value after it, but never some frankenstein value that's partially modified or any interim value. Likewise, two simultaneous calls to -setSum: will result in _sum having the value from one or the other of those calls, but never some mix or interim value. That is the two calls will seem to have happened in a strict order, either A then B or B then A, arbitrarily.

This is easier to understand for a property with a compound type, such as NSRect. Two threads setting the property will never result in, for example, the origin from one thread and the size from another thread being stored. One or the other will "win" and the rect will be coherent. Likewise, a thread calling the getter will never see a mixed value even if it happens simultaneously with a call to the setter.

Next, accesses to the property using dot syntax (e.g. self.sum) are really just a shortcut for calling the accessors. Since there are only get and set accessors, and not any "increment" accessor, a statement like self.sum++; needs to do both, separately:

[self setSum:[self sum] + 1];

So, your statement involves first a call -sum then a call to -setSum: for each thread. There's nothing that ensures that other threads can't interleave their operations with each other. The property's atomicity doesn't prevent it. That is, thread A may get the value 5 from its call to -sum, thread B may also get the value 5 from its call to -sum, each may calculate 6 as the new value, then they both call -setSum: with the value 6. So two threads will have "incremented" the property, but it will only have increased by 1.

In short, atomicity is not thread-safety. It's a conceptual mistake to think that it is. It's just atomicity. It does prevent one kind of corruption that can happen when multiple threads simultaneously access the same property, but not all kinds.

  • very detailed explanation, thx – NickYu Jul 25 '17 at 7:10
  • Can you add additional clarifications on atomic properties when the developer defines their own getters and setters. In other words, if I declare an atomic property and I provide the accessor implementations, do I still have an atomic property? – Tim Reddy Sep 7 '17 at 13:31
  • @TimReddy, if you declare the property atomic, then you are responsible for ensuring that atomicity when you implement the accessors. In general, you can't interoperate with the mechanism that compiler-generated accessors use to maintain atomicity, so if you implement one of the accessors of an atomic read-write property, you have to implement both. If your implementations fail to maintain the atomicity promised in the declaration, then they're buggy. – Ken Thomases Sep 7 '17 at 14:28
0

Try with this:

dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT);
for (NSInteger i = 0; i<1000; i++) {
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
       NSLock *aLock = [[NSLock alloc] init];
       [aLock lock];
       self.sum++;
       [aLock unlock];
    });
}
  • tried still not 1000 – NickYu Jul 25 '17 at 7:06
  • This is creating 1000 independent locks, so wouldn't you expect this to fail? Or are you providing another failing case as an example? – Steve Armstrong Mar 20 '18 at 22:09

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