3

I'm using a component to render table like data, I give it the list of columns, the data, how does the data map to each column, and finally a list of pipes to apply to each column data.

So far so good, only problem is when one of those pipes is the async pipe...

After experimenting for some while, I found out that when the asyncpipe is used on the template the transform method gets called several times. However if I use it programmatically the transform method gets called just once (the time I invoke it).

I guess the reason it's called multiple times on template it's because it's an impure pipe, but how can I handle it programmatically?

Here's a plunker demonstrating what I just said:

@Injectable()
export class AsyncProvider {
  constructor() {}
  
  getById(id: number) {
    // Just some mock data
    return Observable.of({id, times_five: id*5}).delay(1000);
  }
}

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  providers: [AsyncPipe, AsyncProvider]
  template: `
    <div>
      <p>Template async pipe</p>
      <p>{{ asyncObj | async | json }}</p>
      <hr>
      <p>Programmatically async pipe</p>
      <p>{{ asyncObjPiped | json }}</p>
    </div>
  `,
  directives: []
})
export class App {
  constructor(
    private _provider: AsyncProvider,
    private _async: AsyncPipe
  ) {
    this.asyncObj = this._provider.getById(123);
    this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(this.asyncObj);
  }
}

EDIT: Because AsyncPipe performs a markForCheck() on a ChangeDetectorRef uppon receiving new values, I also tried the following:

export class App {
  constructor(
    private _provider: AsyncProvider,
    private _async: AsyncPipe,
    private _ref: ChangeDetectorRef,
  ) {
    this.asyncObj = this._provider.getById(123);
    this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(this.asyncObj);
    
    setInterval(() => {
      this._ref.detectChanges();
    }, 1000);
  }
}

Without any success :(

2
  • What do you mean with handle it programatically what do you want to do?
    – AVJT82
    Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 16:55
  • @AJT_82 I expect it to behave just as if I use the pipe in the template (see the plunker for details), however, because the way asyncPipe works (src code available here: github.com/angular/angular/blob/master/packages/common/src/…) the pipe has to be called more than once for emitting the correct result. This seems to be the reason why asyncpipe is not pure, but I can't figure out either how to "emulate" this non pure behaviour programmatically on the controller, nor I have any idea where in angular code it is.
    – Ignasi
    Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

5

After some struggling I managed to get some results, here it's what I had to do, for future reference.

First method: plunker

export class App {
  constructor(
    private _provider: AsyncProvider,
    private _async: AsyncPipe,
  ) {
    
    this.asyncObj = this._provider.getById(123)
    
    let processPipe = () => {
      this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(new_asyncObj);
    }
    let new_asyncObj = this.asyncObj.finally(processPipe).repeat(2);
    processPipe();
  }
}

Note that a new variable (new_asyncObj) is needed because finally seems to return a new object rather than modifying the existing one. And the repeat(2) after the finally so it will unwrap the promise.


Second method: plunker

export class App {
  constructor(
    private _provider: AsyncProvider,
    private _async: AsyncPipe,
  ) {
    
    this.asyncObj = this._provider.getById(123)
    
    setInterval(() => {
      this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(this.asyncObj);
    }, 500);
    
  }
}

Recalculate the pipe every 500 ms, simple and effective, even though I was expecting for something better.


Final method: plunker

export class App {
  constructor(
    private _provider: AsyncProvider,
    private _async: AsyncPipe,
    private _ref: ChangeDetectorRef,
    private zone: NgZone,
  ) {
    
    this.asyncObj = this._provider.getById(123)
      
    this.zone.onMicrotaskEmpty
      .subscribe(() => {
        this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(this.asyncObj);
        this.asyncObjPiped = this._async.transform(this.asyncObj);
        this._ref.detectChanges();
      });
  }
}

Using NgZone and ChangeDetectorRef seems to work aswell, even thought some ugly hacking as calling AsyncPipe twice, to unwrap the value.


Anyway, hope it can really help anyone who is getting frustrated at dealing with non pure pipes programmatically!

Any suggestion or better answer still welcome!

1
  • 1
    I like the idea of using the async pipe because it triggers OnPush change detection (where manually subscribing does not). And frequently, you need the observed variable in a method. Give you an A for getting this to work at all. That being said ... would be nice if there were a cleaner and better-documented way to do it.
    – Paul Evans
    Commented Feb 21, 2018 at 16:48

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