368

I've created an object like this:

company1.name = 'banana' 
company1.value = 40

I would like to save this object. How can I do that?

3
  • 3
    See example for people who come here for a simple example how to use pickle. Apr 16, 2018 at 11:53
  • @MartinThoma: Why do you (seemingly) prefer that answer to the accepted one (of the linked question)?
    – martineau
    Jul 5, 2018 at 3:41
  • At the time I linked, the accepted answer did not have protocol=pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL. My answer also gives alternatives to pickle. Jul 5, 2018 at 4:49

6 Answers 6

669

You could use the pickle module in the standard library. Here's an elementary application of it to your example:

import pickle

class Company(object):
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name = name
        self.value = value

with open('company_data.pkl', 'wb') as outp:
    company1 = Company('banana', 40)
    pickle.dump(company1, outp, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

    company2 = Company('spam', 42)
    pickle.dump(company2, outp, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

del company1
del company2

with open('company_data.pkl', 'rb') as inp:
    company1 = pickle.load(inp)
    print(company1.name)  # -> banana
    print(company1.value)  # -> 40

    company2 = pickle.load(inp)
    print(company2.name) # -> spam
    print(company2.value)  # -> 42

You could also define your own simple utility like the following which opens a file and writes a single object to it:

def save_object(obj, filename):
    with open(filename, 'wb') as outp:  # Overwrites any existing file.
        pickle.dump(obj, outp, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

# sample usage
save_object(company1, 'company1.pkl')

Update

Since this is such a popular answer, I'd like touch on a few slightly advanced usage topics.

cPickle (or _pickle) vs pickle

It's almost always preferable to actually use the cPickle module rather than pickle because the former is written in C and is much faster. There are some subtle differences between them, but in most situations they're equivalent and the C version will provide greatly superior performance. Switching to it couldn't be easier, just change the import statement to this:

import cPickle as pickle

In Python 3, cPickle was renamed _pickle, but doing this is no longer necessary since the pickle module now does it automatically—see What difference between pickle and _pickle in python 3?.

The rundown is you could use something like the following to ensure that your code will always use the C version when it's available in both Python 2 and 3:

try:
    import cPickle as pickle
except ModuleNotFoundError:
    import pickle

Data stream formats (protocols)

pickle can read and write files in several different, Python-specific, formats, called protocols as described in the documentation, "Protocol version 0" is ASCII and therefore "human-readable". Versions > 0 are binary and the highest one available depends on what version of Python is being used. The default also depends on Python version. In Python 2 the default was Protocol version 0, but in Python 3.8.1, it's Protocol version 4. In Python 3.x the module had a pickle.DEFAULT_PROTOCOL added to it, but that doesn't exist in Python 2.

Fortunately there's shorthand for writing pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL in every call (assuming that's what you want, and you usually do), just use the literal number -1 — similar to referencing the last element of a sequence via a negative index. So, instead of writing:

pickle.dump(obj, outp, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)

You can just write:

pickle.dump(obj, outp, -1)

Either way, you'd only have specify the protocol once if you created a Pickler object for use in multiple pickle operations:

pickler = pickle.Pickler(outp, -1)
pickler.dump(obj1)
pickler.dump(obj2)
   etc...

Note: If you're in an environment running different versions of Python, then you'll probably want to explicitly use (i.e. hardcode) a specific protocol number that all of them can read (later versions can generally read files produced by earlier ones).

Multiple Objects

While a pickle file can contain any number of pickled objects, as shown in the above samples, when there's an unknown number of them, it's often easier to store them all in some sort of variably-sized container, like a list, tuple, or dict and write them all to the file in a single call:

tech_companies = [
    Company('Apple', 114.18), Company('Google', 908.60), Company('Microsoft', 69.18)
]
save_object(tech_companies, 'tech_companies.pkl')

and restore the list and everything in it later with:

with open('tech_companies.pkl', 'rb') as inp:
    tech_companies = pickle.load(inp)

The major advantage is you don't need to know how many object instances are saved in order to load them back later (although doing so without that information is possible, it requires some slightly specialized code). See the answers to the related question Saving and loading multiple objects in pickle file? for details on different ways to do this. Personally I liked @Lutz Prechelt's answer the best, so that's the approach used in the sample code below:

class Company:
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name = name
        self.value = value

def pickle_loader(filename):
    """ Deserialize a file of pickled objects. """
    with open(filename, "rb") as f:
        while True:
            try:
                yield pickle.load(f)
            except EOFError:
                break

print('Companies in pickle file:')
for company in pickle_loader('company_data.pkl'):
    print('  name: {}, value: {}'.format(company.name, company.value))
20
  • 2
    This is rare to me because I imagined there would be a easier way to do save a object... Something like 'saveobject(company1,c:\mypythonobjects)
    – Peterstone
    Dec 25, 2010 at 9:45
  • 8
    @Peterstone: If you only wanted to store one object you would only need about half as much code as in my example -- I purposefully wrote it the way I did to show how more than one object could be saved into (and later read back from) the same file.
    – martineau
    Dec 25, 2010 at 9:57
  • 1
    @Peterstone, there is a very good reason for the separation of responsibilities. This way there is no limitation on how the data from the pickling process is being used. You can store it to disc or you could also send it accross a network connection. Dec 25, 2010 at 16:20
  • 4
    @martinaeau, this was in response to perstones remark about one should have just one function to save an object to disk. The pickles responsibility is only to turn an object into data that can be handled as a chunk. Writing things to file is the file objects responsibility. By keeping things separate one enables higher reuse e.g. being able to send the pickled data accross a network connection or storing it in a database, all responsibilities separate from the actual data<->object conversion Jan 1, 2011 at 22:38
  • 2
    @Mike: Sorry, I don't think this question is the right kind of nail. FWIW, I think an effective way to promote dill would be to more clearly state what it can do that pickle can't on its download page, rather than proposing its use to solve issues unrelated to the problem at hand in various SO posts. If there's a consensus that it adequately addresses serious deficiencies folks are commonly encountering while trying to use pickle, perhaps it should be made part of the standard library.
    – martineau
    Mar 13, 2016 at 21:17
73

I think it's a pretty strong assumption to assume that the object is a class. What if it's not a class? There's also the assumption that the object was not defined in the interpreter. What if it was defined in the interpreter? Also, what if the attributes were added dynamically? When some python objects have attributes added to their __dict__ after creation, pickle doesn't respect the addition of those attributes (i.e. it 'forgets' they were added -- because pickle serializes by reference to the object definition).

In all these cases, pickle and cPickle can fail you horribly.

If you are looking to save an object (arbitrarily created), where you have attributes (either added in the object definition, or afterward)… your best bet is to use dill, which can serialize almost anything in python.

We start with a class…

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import pickle
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> with open('company.pkl', 'wb') as f:
...     pickle.dump(company1, f, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)
... 
>>> 

Now shut down, and restart...

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import pickle
>>> with open('company.pkl', 'rb') as f:
...     company1 = pickle.load(f)
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1378, in load
    return Unpickler(file).load()
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 858, in load
dispatch[key](self)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1090, in load_global
    klass = self.find_class(module, name)
  File "/opt/local/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/pickle.py", line 1126, in find_class
    klass = getattr(mod, name)
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Company'
>>> 

Oops… pickle can't handle it. Let's try dill. We'll throw in another object type (a lambda) for good measure.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill       
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> 
>>> company2 = lambda x:x
>>> company2.name = 'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value = 42
>>> 
>>> with open('company_dill.pkl', 'wb') as f:
...     dill.dump(company1, f)
...     dill.dump(company2, f)
... 
>>> 

And now read the file.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> with open('company_dill.pkl', 'rb') as f:
...     company1 = dill.load(f)
...     company2 = dill.load(f)
... 
>>> company1 
<__main__.Company instance at 0x107909128>
>>> company1.name
'banana'
>>> company1.value
40
>>> company2.name
'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value
42
>>>    

It works. The reason pickle fails, and dill doesn't, is that dill treats __main__ like a module (for the most part), and also can pickle class definitions instead of pickling by reference (like pickle does). The reason dill can pickle a lambda is that it gives it a name… then pickling magic can happen.

Actually, there's an easier way to save all these objects, especially if you have a lot of objects you've created. Just dump the whole python session, and come back to it later.

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> class Company:
...     pass
... 
>>> company1 = Company()
>>> company1.name = 'banana'
>>> company1.value = 40
>>> 
>>> company2 = lambda x:x
>>> company2.name = 'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value = 42
>>> 
>>> dill.dump_session('dill.pkl')
>>> 

Now shut down your computer, go enjoy an espresso or whatever, and come back later...

Python 2.7.8 (default, Jul 13 2014, 02:29:54) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple Clang 4.1 ((tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66))] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import dill
>>> dill.load_session('dill.pkl')
>>> company1.name
'banana'
>>> company1.value
40
>>> company2.name
'rhubarb'
>>> company2.value
42
>>> company2
<function <lambda> at 0x1065f2938>

The only major drawback is that dill is not part of the python standard library. So if you can't install a python package on your server, then you can't use it.

However, if you are able to install python packages on your system, you can get the latest dill with git+https://github.com/uqfoundation/dill.git@master#egg=dill. And you can get the latest released version with pip install dill.

8
  • I'm getting a TypeError: __new__() takes at least 2 arguments (1 given) when trying to use dill (which looks promising) with a rather complex object that includes an audio file.
    – MikeiLL
    Aug 27, 2014 at 18:24
  • 1
    @MikeiLL: You are getting a TypeError when you do what, exactly? That's usually a sign of having the wrong number of arguments when instantiating a class instance. If this is not part of the workflow of the above question, could you post it as another question, submit it to me over email, or add it as an issue on the dill github page? Aug 27, 2014 at 20:01
  • 3
    For anyone following along, here's the related question @MikeLL posted -- from the answer, it apparently wasn't a dill issue.
    – martineau
    Feb 2, 2015 at 17:12
  • dill gives me MemoryError though! so does cPickle, pickle and hickle.
    – doplano
    Oct 10, 2019 at 7:45
  • During read operation I am getting following error for dill RecursionError: maximum recursion depth exceeded would it be possible to over come this?
    – alper
    Nov 27, 2021 at 13:50
18

Quick example using company1 from your question, with python3.

import pickle

# Save the file
pickle.dump(company1, file = open("company1.pickle", "wb"))

# Reload the file
company1_reloaded = pickle.load(open("company1.pickle", "rb"))

However, as this answer noted, pickle often fails. So you should really use dill.

import dill

# Save the file
dill.dump(company1, file = open("company1.pickle", "wb"))

# Reload the file
company1_reloaded = dill.load(open("company1.pickle", "rb"))
7

You can use anycache to do the job for you. It considers all the details:

  • It uses dill as backend, which extends the python pickle module to handle lambda and all the nice python features.
  • It stores different objects to different files and reloads them properly.
  • Limits cache size
  • Allows cache clearing
  • Allows sharing of objects between multiple runs
  • Allows respect of input files which influence the result

Assuming you have a function myfunc which creates the instance:

from anycache import anycache

class Company(object):
    def __init__(self, name, value):
        self.name = name
        self.value = value

@anycache(cachedir='/path/to/your/cache')    
def myfunc(name, value)
    return Company(name, value)

Anycache calls myfunc at the first time and pickles the result to a file in cachedir using an unique identifier (depending on the function name and its arguments) as filename. On any consecutive run, the pickled object is loaded. If the cachedir is preserved between python runs, the pickled object is taken from the previous python run.

For any further details see the documentation

1
  • How would one use anycache to save more than one instance of, say, a class or container such as a list (that wasn't the result of calling a function)?
    – martineau
    Jun 4, 2018 at 13:59
4

Newer versions of pandas has also a functionality to save pickles.

I find it easier. e.g.

pd.to_pickle(object_to_save,'/temp/saved_pkl.pickle' )
2

While pickle is the most widely used option for serialising objects, it's not without its concerns, especially regarding security. It's possible to construct a Python object that, when deserialised, will execute arbitrary code. An example is included below.

import pickle

class Example:
    def __reduce__(self):
        print("Serialised")
        return print, ("Deserialised",)

example = Example()

serialised = pickle.dumps(example) # prints "Serialised"
pickle.loads(serialised) # prints "Deserialised"

While the above example is perfectly harmless, it would be trivial to make it much, much nastier, for example by replacing print with exec or eval in the return value.

There isn't really a good solution to this, but people have mentioned the dill library as a possible alternative to pickle. There is, however, another alternative, marshal. It's a builtin serialisation library, but it has the drawback that it doesn't work on some kinds of object (though, unlike pickle, it can serialise CodeObjects, which is why it is internally used to serialise the aforementioned during compilation of CodeObjects into .pyc files). It's also much faster, being in C (code here), but hasn't been rigorously audited. However, no security vulnerabilities are known.

marshal is effectively a drop-in replacement for pickle. The loads, load, dumps and dump methods all do exactly the same thing.

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