2

If some class does NOT perform dynamic memory allocation, it is only sufficient to declare a copy constructor?

See the following example, please

Instead of:

class A
{
    protected :
            int a;
    public:
            A(const A &source)
            {
                    a = source.a;
            }


};

class B: public A
{
    protected :
            int b;
    public:
            B(const B &source): A(source)
            {
                    b = source.b;
            }
};

use:

class A
{
    protected :
            int a;
    public:
            A(const A &source);

};

class B: public A
{
    protected :
            int b;
    public:
            B(const B &source);

};

Could the second variant sometimes cause problems? Some example would be helpfull.

  • 1
    you don't need to declare the copy d'tor at all (Incase you don't perform memory allocation) – Delashmate Dec 25 '10 at 16:47
  • It can cause problems even if the class don't alloc memory, for example in case the members of the class are pointers, and some else is allocated the memory – Delashmate Dec 25 '10 at 16:52
5

In cases where a simple item-by-item copy of every item will do the trick, i.e., when you have no pointers that need to be deep-copied, and no other behavior in the constructor besides initializing variables, you don't need to declare a copy constructor at all. The default implementation will do that for you.

4

Best is to neither define nor declare the copy constructor, the compiler-generated one will work fine.

If you declare the copy-constructor, the compiler will no longer provide one, and you'll get linker errors if you use it but didn't write a function body for it.

3

The second example should throw a linker error since the copy constructor is declared, but not defined. It should not be declared at all. If it is declared, it must also be defined, and then the class will also need a custom destructor and assignment operator (law of the big three).

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