-7

check the screenshot, i honestly have no idea what's wrong with it

can anyone help me?

        if (strstr(pMaterial->GetTextureGroupName(), "World textures"))
        {
            pMaterial->ColorModulate(0.5, 0.5, 0.5);
        }

screenshot

1: C2665 'strstr': none of the 2 overloads could convert all the argument types

2: E0304 no instance of overloaded function "strstr" matches the argument list

  • 3
    whats wrong with the screenshot is that it is a screenshot. Please include code and error in the question (not images and please no links to images) – idclev 463035818 Jul 25 '17 at 16:49
  • 3
    The error tells you exactly what's wrong. You're passing in std::string, const char[15], and there is no overloaded version of strstr that accepts those parameters. – Ken White Jul 25 '17 at 16:51
  • 1
    Did you even read the error? If yes, you would know exactly what's wrong. – DimChtz Jul 25 '17 at 16:52
  • 1
    Consider using std::string::find instead strstr. – Captain Obvlious Jul 25 '17 at 16:58
  • 2
    @Captain Obvlious - as in "write C++, not C"? - Yes, I agree ;-) – Jesper Juhl Jul 25 '17 at 17:00
1

Your GetTextureGroupName() function is of a std::string type. The std::strstr() function does not accept a std::string as a parameter. Use the string c_str() member function instead:

if (std::strstr(pMaterial->GetTextureGroupName().c_str(), "World textures")){
    pMaterial->ColorModulate(0.5, 0.5, 0.5);
}

Rather than falling back to C style strings you should explore the std::string facilities as pointed out in the comments. The modified example uses the std::string::find member function:

if (pMaterial->GetTextureGroupName().find("World textures")!= std::string::npos){
    pMaterial->ColorModulate(0.5, 0.5, 0.5);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Why degrade to a C string rather than using what std::string provides ? – Jesper Juhl Jul 25 '17 at 17:02
-1

strstr accept two char * pointers. You could change it to:

strstr(pMaterial->GetTextureGroupName().c_str(), "World textures")
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I think there is a typo: c_ptr -> c_str – Tobias Wollgam Jul 25 '17 at 16:59

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