61

I've been trying to calculate median but still I've got some mathematical issues I guess as I couldn't get the correct median value and couldn't figure out why. Here's the code;

class StatsCollector {

    constructor() {
        this.inputNumber = 0;
        this.average = 0;

        this.timeout = 19000;

        this.frequencies = new Map();
        for (let i of Array(this.timeout).keys()) {
            this.frequencies.set(i, 0);
        }
    }

    pushValue(responseTimeMs) {
        let req = responseTimeMs;
        if (req > this.timeout) {
            req = this.timeout;
        }

        this.average = (this.average * this.inputNumber + req) / (this.inputNumber + 1);

        console.log(responseTimeMs / 1000)
        let groupIndex = Math.floor(responseTimeMs / 1000);
        this.frequencies.set(groupIndex, this.frequencies.get(groupIndex) + 1);

        this.inputNumber += 1;
    }

    getMedian() {
        let medianElement = 0;
        if (this.inputNumber <= 0) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (this.inputNumber == 1) {
            return this.average
        }
        if (this.inputNumber == 2) {
            return this.average
        }
        if (this.inputNumber > 2) {
            medianElement = this.inputNumber / 2;
        }

        let minCumulativeFreq = 0;
        let maxCumulativeFreq = 0;
        let cumulativeFreq = 0;
        let freqGroup = 0;
        for (let i of Array(20).keys()) {
            if (medianElement <= cumulativeFreq + this.frequencies.get(i)) {
                minCumulativeFreq = cumulativeFreq;
                maxCumulativeFreq = cumulativeFreq + this.frequencies.get(i);
                freqGroup = i;
                break;
            }
            cumulativeFreq += this.frequencies.get(i);
        }

        return (((medianElement - minCumulativeFreq) / (maxCumulativeFreq - minCumulativeFreq)) + (freqGroup)) * 1000;
    }

    getAverage() {
        return this.average;
    }

}

Here's the snapshot of the results when I enter the values of

342,654,987,1093,2234,6243,7087,20123

enter image description here

The correct result should be;

Median: 1663.5

6
  • maybe look here Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 16:57
  • 3
    To calculate the median, you have to sort the values and pick the middle one.
    – Pointy
    Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 16:58
  • 2
    That's not a median. The median should be in the set. Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 16:58
  • 1
    The Median is the middle number of the sorted list if there are a odd number of values, if there are an even number the median is the mid point or average of the central two values.
    – Mark B
    Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 17:06
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of find median values from array in javascript (8 values or 9 values)
    – str
    Commented Jul 25, 2017 at 17:09

17 Answers 17

110

Change your median method to this:

function median(values: number[]): number {

  if (values.length === 0) {
    throw new Error('Input array is empty');
  }

  // Sorting values, preventing original array
  // from being mutated.
  values = [...values].sort((a, b) => a - b);

  const half = Math.floor(values.length / 2);

  return (values.length % 2
    ? values[half]
    : (values[half - 1] + values[half]) / 2
  );

}

fiddle

8
  • 1
    what happens when values.length ===0? I recommend a safe check at the first line if(values.length ===0) return 0
    – Panthro
    Commented Sep 4, 2017 at 11:13
  • 2
    You do not need the else
    – dll
    Commented Apr 24, 2018 at 8:38
  • 25
    Note that this method modifies the given array. Commented May 23, 2019 at 21:07
  • 7
    I think the median of an empty array is not 0, but undefined.
    – gmolau
    Commented Mar 24, 2020 at 12:10
  • 9
    To preserve the given array, use something like values = [...values]; at the function start. Commented Nov 19, 2020 at 16:53
63

Here's another solution:

function median(numbers) {
    const sorted = Array.from(numbers).sort((a, b) => a - b);
    const middle = Math.floor(sorted.length / 2);

    if (sorted.length % 2 === 0) {
        return (sorted[middle - 1] + sorted[middle]) / 2;
    }

    return sorted[middle];
}

console.log(median([4, 5, 7, 1, 33]));

5
  • 15
    Good, this keeps the original array unmodified. Commented May 23, 2019 at 21:11
  • 7
    I know that I am 2 years late but this answer is better than the other ones at the top.
    – user13594322
    Commented Jun 1, 2020 at 19:33
  • A check for the length of the argument array being greater or equal to two is missing. Commented May 2, 2022 at 9:40
  • @FilipIlievski indeed this assumes valid inputs. We could also verify that the input is actually an Array (length can be set on objects), that the elements are numbers, etc.
    – JBallin
    Commented May 2, 2022 at 15:22
  • @JBallin yes, valid points :) I come from TypeScript, so a bit less to worry about once you properly define your types. ✌️ Commented May 3, 2022 at 7:58
18

2024 TypeScript Approach

const median = (arr: number[]): number | undefined => {
  if (!arr.length) return undefined;
  const s = [...arr].sort((a, b) => a - b);
  const mid = Math.floor(s.length / 2);
  return s.length % 2 ? s[mid] : ((s[mid - 1] + s[mid]) / 2);
};

Notes:

  • The type in the function signature (number[]) ensures only an array of numbers can be passed to the function. It could possibly be empty though.
  • if (!arr.length) return undefined; checks for the possible empty array, which would not have a median.
  • [...arr] creates a copy of the passed-in array to ensure we don't overwrite the original.
  • .sort((a, b) => a - b) sorts the array of numbers in ascending order.
  • Math.floor(s.length / 2) finds the index of the middle element if the array has odd length, or the element just to the right of the middle if the array has even length.
  • s.length % 2 determines whether the array has an even length.
  • (s[mid - 1] + s[mid]) / 2 averages the two middle items of the array if the array's length is even.
  • s[mid] is the middle item of an odd-length array.
2
  • 1
    This should be upvoted. Definitely best answer. Also version for javascript. Commented Nov 16, 2022 at 18:58
  • 2
    In 2024 I would recommend using Array.prototype.toSorted() instead of manually copying the array for immutability
    – Sleavely
    Commented Feb 5 at 8:47
13

The solutions above - sort then find middle - are fine, but slow on large data sets. Sorting the data first has a complexity of n x log(n).

There is a faster median algorithm, which consists in segregating the array in two according to a pivot, then looking for the median in the larger set. Here is some javascript code, but here is a more detailed explanation

// Trying some array
alert(quickselect_median([7,3,5])); // 2300,5,4,0,123,2,76,768,28]));

function quickselect_median(arr) {
   const L = arr.length, halfL = L/2;
   if (L % 2 == 1)
      return quickselect(arr, halfL);
   else
      return 0.5 * (quickselect(arr, halfL - 1) + quickselect(arr, halfL));
}

function quickselect(arr, k) {
   // Select the kth element in arr
   // arr: List of numerics
   // k: Index
   // return: The kth element (in numerical order) of arr
   if (arr.length == 1)
      return arr[0];
   else {
      const pivot = arr[0];
      const lows = arr.filter((e)=>(e<pivot));
      const highs = arr.filter((e)=>(e>pivot));
      const pivots = arr.filter((e)=>(e==pivot));
      if (k < lows.length) // the pivot is too high
         return quickselect(lows, k);
      else if (k < lows.length + pivots.length)// We got lucky and guessed the median
         return pivot;
      else // the pivot is too low
         return quickselect(highs, k - lows.length - pivots.length);
   }
}

Astute readers will notice a few things:

  1. I simply transliterated Russel Cohen's Python solution into JS, so all kudos to him.
  2. There are several small optimisations worth doing, but there's parallelisation worth doing, and the code as is is easier to change in either a quicker single-threaded, or quicker multi-threaded, version.
  3. This is the average linear time algorithm, there is more efficient a deterministic linear time version, see Russel's post for details, including performance data.

ADDITION 19 Sept. 2019:

One comment asks whether this is worth doing in javascript. I ran the code in JSPerf and it gives interesting results.

  • if the array has an odd number of elements (one figure to find), sorting is 20% slower that this "fast median" proposition.

  • if there is an even number of elements, the "fast" algorithm is 40% slower, because it filters through the data twice, to find elements number k and k+1 to average. It is possible to write a version of fast median that doesn't do this.

The test used rather small arrays (29 elements in the jsperf test). The effect appears to be more pronounced as arrays get larger. A more general point to make is: it shows these kinds of optimisations are worth doing in Javascript. An awful lot of computation is done in JS, including with large amounts of data (think of dashboards, spreadsheets, data visualisations), and in systems with limited resources (think of mobile and embedded computing).

3
  • I'm trying to understand wether it makes sense for javascript. This quickselect algorithm seems to be trying to implement a Quicksort algorithm by hand. In javascript the type of sort algorithm depending on the size of array and the browser too. When you use Array.sort() an optimized sort algorithm is chosen in the background. I coube be mistaken, off course, what do you think about it ? Commented Jul 26, 2019 at 13:22
  • 1
    My answer is probably a product of my bend as a computing educator, more than practitioner - I teach the thing, so there's a fantastic lesson in this. Whether the algorithm above is a good idea depends on why you're doing this, as always. How big, the arrays? Are lots of them? Will you need the data sorted at some point, or need other stats like quartiles etc? do you use other libraries that change the tool selection? Is time performance a big factor to you? Is resources a big factor to you?
    – boisvert
    Commented Aug 16, 2019 at 17:44
  • 1
    @ThiagoC.SVentura your comment prompted to test if the difference would be visible in JSPerf. I add the results to the answer.
    – boisvert
    Commented Sep 19, 2019 at 13:30
6
var arr = {  
  max: function(array) {
    return Math.max.apply(null, array);
  },
  
  min: function(array) {
    return Math.min.apply(null, array);
  },
  
  range: function(array) {
    return arr.max(array) - arr.min(array);
  },
  
  midrange: function(array) {
    return arr.range(array) / 2;
  },

  sum: function(array) {
    var num = 0;
    for (var i = 0, l = array.length; i < l; i++) num += array[i];
    return num;
  },
  
  mean: function(array) {
    return arr.sum(array) / array.length;
  },
  
  median: function(array) {
    array.sort(function(a, b) {
      return a - b;
    });
    var mid = array.length / 2;
    return mid % 1 ? array[mid - 0.5] : (array[mid - 1] + array[mid]) / 2;
  },
  
  modes: function(array) {
    if (!array.length) return [];
    var modeMap = {},
      maxCount = 1,
      modes = [array[0]];

    array.forEach(function(val) {
      if (!modeMap[val]) modeMap[val] = 1;
      else modeMap[val]++;

      if (modeMap[val] > maxCount) {
        modes = [val];
        maxCount = modeMap[val];
      }
      else if (modeMap[val] === maxCount) {
        modes.push(val);
        maxCount = modeMap[val];
      }
    });
    return modes;
  },
  
  variance: function(array) {
    var mean = arr.mean(array);
    return arr.mean(array.map(function(num) {
      return Math.pow(num - mean, 2);
    }));
  },
  
  standardDeviation: function(array) {
    return Math.sqrt(arr.variance(array));
  },
  
  meanAbsoluteDeviation: function(array) {
    var mean = arr.mean(array);
    return arr.mean(array.map(function(num) {
      return Math.abs(num - mean);
    }));
  },
  
  zScores: function(array) {
    var mean = arr.mean(array);
    var standardDeviation = arr.standardDeviation(array);
    return array.map(function(num) {
      return (num - mean) / standardDeviation;
    });
  }
};
4
  • 11
    Thanks for copy-pasting the whole library, but where does this come from?
    – Déjà vu
    Commented Dec 6, 2018 at 23:28
  • 2
    Again, this median function will modify the input array when it sorts it. Just something to be aware of. Commented Jun 15, 2021 at 17:49
  • Does anyone know if these are fast? These are very helpful.
    – jboxxx
    Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 2:24
  • 1
    @jboxxx Yes they are fast I have tested it. I used in LeetCode in one algorithem the results were : Runtime: 159 ms, faster than 59.70% of JavaScript online submissions for Median of Two Sorted Arrays. Memory Usage: 47 MB, less than 71.82% of JavaScript online submissions for Median of Two Sorted Arrays. Commented Sep 5, 2022 at 11:37
3
const median = (arr) => {
  return arr.slice().sort((a, b) => a - b)[Math.floor(arr.length / 2)];
};
3
  • This method will give incorrect results [1,2,3,4] results in 3 while it should be 2.5 Commented Oct 22, 2023 at 8:42
  • @Mohsen Alyafei You're talking about average not median. Commented Oct 22, 2023 at 14:14
  • No. Average would be 5. Median would be 2.5. Average is total divided by 2. Median is the middle number. If no middle number then the 2 numbers on the side divided by 2. Commented Oct 22, 2023 at 15:23
2

TypeScript Answer 2020:

// Calculate Median 
const calculateMedian = (array: Array<number>) => {
  // Check If Data Exists
  if (array.length >= 1) {
    // Sort Array
    array = array.sort((a: number, b: number) => {
      return a - b;
    });

    // Array Length: Even
    if (array.length % 2 === 0) {
      // Average Of Two Middle Numbers
      return (array[(array.length / 2) - 1] + array[array.length / 2]) / 2;
    }
    // Array Length: Odd
    else {
      // Middle Number
      return array[(array.length - 1) / 2];
    }
  }
  else {
    // Error
    console.error('Error: Empty Array (calculateMedian)');
  }
};

1

Short and sweet.

Array.prototype.median = function () {
  return this.slice().sort((a, b) => a - b)[Math.floor(this.length / 2)]; 
};

Usage

[4, 5, 7, 1, 33].median()

Works with strings as well

["a","a","b","b","c","d","e"].median()
3
  • 1
    [0, 5].median() produces 5 as a result Commented Nov 24, 2020 at 1:03
  • 16
    DON'T MUTATE PROTOTYPES. Commented Mar 11, 2021 at 18:17
  • const median = (a) => a.slice().sort((a, b) => a - b)[Math.floor(a.length / 2)];
    – Alexey Sh.
    Commented Oct 28, 2023 at 13:44
0

Simpler & more efficient

const median = dataSet => {
  if (dataSet.length === 1) return dataSet[0]
  const sorted = ([ ...dataSet ]).sort()
  const ceil = Math.ceil(sorted.length / 2)
  const floor = Math.floor(sorted.length / 2)
  if (ceil === floor) return sorted[floor]
  return ((sorted[ceil] + sorted[floor]) / 2)
}
0

Simple solution:

function calcMedian(array) {
  const {
    length
  } = array;

  if (length < 1)
    return 0;

  //sort array asc
  array.sort((a, b) => a - b);

  if (length % 2) {
    //length of array is odd
    return array[(length + 1) / 2 - 1];
  } else {
    //length of array is even
    return 0.5 * [(array[length / 2 - 1] + array[length / 2])];
  }
}

console.log(2, calcMedian([1, 2, 2, 5, 6]));
console.log(3.5, calcMedian([1, 2, 2, 5, 6, 7]));
console.log(9, calcMedian([13, 9, 8, 15, 7]));
console.log(3.5, calcMedian([1, 4, 6, 3]));
console.log(5, calcMedian([5, 1, 11, 2, 8]));

0

Simpler, more efficient, and easy to read

  1. cloned the data to avoid alterations to the original data.
  2. sort the list of values.
  3. get the middle point.
  4. get the median from the list.
  5. return the median.

function getMedian(data) {
    const values = [...data];
    const v   = values.sort( (a, b) => a - b);
    const mid = Math.floor( v.length / 2);
    const median = (v.length % 2 !== 0) ? v[mid] : (v[mid - 1] + v[mid]) / 2; 
    return median;
}

3
  • 1
    While your answer may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. You can edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. - From Review Commented Mar 2, 2021 at 16:08
  • 1
    You write "simpler & more efficient", but it would be good to know what you compare with, since many have already answered with similar code. Essentially the sort operation determines the execution time, and most answers have used that.
    – trincot
    Commented Mar 3, 2021 at 16:16
  • Doesn't work console.log(getMedian([-0.51182868190794402, 0.33955843791573237, 1.073205764212215])); Commented Oct 28, 2021 at 13:43
0

       const medianArr = (x) => {
        let sortedx = x.sort((a,b)=> a-b);
        let halfIndex = Math.floor(sortedx.length/2);
        
         return (sortedx.length%2) ? (sortedx[Math.floor(sortedx.length/2)]) :  ((sortedx[halfIndex-1]+sortedx[halfIndex])/2)
    }
    
    console.log(medianArr([1,2,3,4,5]));
    console.log(medianArr([1,2,3,4,5,6]));

0

function Median(arr){
    let len = arr.length;
    arr = arr.sort();
    let result = 0;
    let mid = Math.floor(len/2);
    if(len % 2 !== 0){
        result += arr[mid];
    }
    if(len % 2 === 0){
        result += (arr[mid] + arr[mid+1])/2
    }
    return result;
    
}

console.log(`The median is ${Median([0,1,2,3,4,5,6])}`)

0
function median(arr) {
    let n = arr.length;
    let med = Math.floor(n/2);
    if(n % 2 != 0){
       return arr[med];
    } else{
       return (arr[med -1] + arr[med])/ 2.0
    }
 }
 console.log(median[1,2,3,4,5,6]);
1
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Ethan
    Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 23:45
0

The arr.sort() method sorts the elements of an array in place and returns the array. By default, it sorts the elements alphabetically, so if the array contains numbers, they will not be sorted in numerical order. On the other hand, the arr.sort((a, b) => a - b) method uses a callback function to specify how the array should be sorted. The callback function compares the two elements a and b and returns a negative number if a should be sorted before b, a positive number if b should be sorted before a, and zero if the elements are equal. In this case, the callback function subtracts b from a, which results in a sorting order that is numerical in ascending order.

So, if you want to sort an array of numbers in ascending order, you should use arr.sort((a, b) => a - b), whereas if you want to sort an array of strings alphabetically, you can use arr.sort():

function median(numbers) {
    const sorted = Array.from(numbers).sort((a, b) => a - b);
    const middle = Math.floor(sorted.length / 2);

    if (sorted.length % 2 === 0) {
        return (sorted[middle - 1] + sorted[middle]) / 2;
    }

    return sorted[middle];
}
0

For better performance in terms of time complexity, use (MaxHeap - MinHeap) to find the median of stream of array.

-1

function findMedian(arr) {
  arr.sort((a, b) => a - b)

  let i = Math.floor(arr.length / 2)
  return arr[i]
}

let result = findMedian([0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 5, 3])
console.log(result)

1
  • 1
    Your answer is broken. Please fix it. Please also add an explanation. Code-only answers are likely to be flagged as low-quality by review.
    – Jan
    Commented Aug 22, 2022 at 6:38

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