1

This question already has an answer here:

I have trait FooTrait which has a bunch of functions. I also have structs FooStruct and BarStruct and want to implement FooTrait for both structs with the methods doing exactly the same.

Is there a way to implement FooTrait for both FooStruct and BarStruct at once? I imagined something like the following:

impl FooTrait for FooStruct + BarStruct {
    // implement methods here
}

marked as duplicate by Shepmaster rust May 7 '18 at 22:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    What would be the difference between FooStruct and BarStruct? Usually, different structs require distinct implementations. – Sir E_net4 the Downvoter Jul 25 '17 at 17:19
  • Usually I use marcos for this. – colinfang Jul 25 '17 at 18:35
3

No, there is no way to implement one trait for multiple structs at the same time without metaprogramming like macros.

I'd go so far as to say that there's no reason to, either. If you actually had "the methods doing exactly the same", then you should extract the common member variables into a different struct and implement the trait for that struct (if you even need the trait anymore). You can then add the new struct as a member of the originals.

If you had something like

struct Dog {
    hunger: u8,
    wagging: bool,
}

struct Cat {
    hunger: u8,
    meowing: bool,
}

trait Hungry {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool;
}

You could have

struct Dog {
    hunger: Hunger,
    wagging: bool,
}

struct Cat {
    hunger: Hunger,
    meowing: bool,
}

struct Hunger {
    level: u8,
}

impl Hunger {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool {
        self.level > 100
    }
}

If you needed the trait for other reasons, you can just delegate it:

trait Hungry {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool;
}

impl Hungry for Hunger {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool {
        self.level > 100
    }
}

impl Hungry for Dog {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool { self.hunger.is_hungry() }
}

impl Hungry for Cat {
    fn is_hungry(&self) -> bool { self.hunger.is_hungry() }
}

These last two implementations are still the same, but it's a minimal amount of duplication. Even then, I still hold out hope for a form of delegation to be introduced at the syntax level.

  • @ Shepmaster I have been searching for a way to do this for the longest time! Thank you – ralston3 Sep 1 '18 at 6:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.