1

The code below creates a string with date and time for example Wed Jul 26 14:45:28 2017

How could I remove the spaces from it? So that is is WedJul2614:45:28?

Original code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main() {
    time_t t = time(NULL);
    struct tm *tm = localtime(&t);
    char s[64];
    strftime(s, sizeof(s), "%c", tm);
    printf("%s\n", s);
}

I tried this code but it prints wed?July

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main() {
    time_t t = time(NULL);
    struct tm *tm = localtime(&t);
    char s[64];
    char temp[64];
    strftime(s, sizeof(s), "%c", tm);
    printf("%s\n", s);


    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(s); i++) {
      if (s[i] != ' ') {
        temp[i] = s[i];
      }
    }
printf("%s\n", temp);  
}
4
  • 1
    You're not copying anything when encountering space characters, so when you print out temp the characters you see there are at the mercy of what was allocated for you (for example, the ? character). You should use another index to keep track of how far you are in to temp so you make sure the "holes" are filled in. You should also make sure temp is properly null-terminated when you're finished copying. Jul 26, 2017 at 13:56
  • 1
    Two problems: You use uninitialized elements of s since you use sizeof instead of strlen to get the length of the string in s. The other is you basically make a straight string copy from s to temp except where s contains a space, where you leave the corresponding element in temp uninitialized. Jul 26, 2017 at 13:57
  • 4
    Why don't you replace your format string "%c" by a string that only includes the fields you want without spaces? Like "%a%b%d%T"
    – Gerhardh
    Jul 26, 2017 at 14:00
  • 1
    Again a perfect opportunity to learn how to use debugger and trace through the program line by line inspecting the values of the relevant variables to learn what is really going on. If then a specific question arises feel free to come back here.
    – alk
    Jul 26, 2017 at 15:07

5 Answers 5

6
int j = 0;
for (int i = 0; s[i]!='\0'; i++) {
  if (s[i] != ' ') {
    temp[j] = s[i];
    j++;
  }
}

Keep track of the index so you don't just leave the spaces with some random value. Also, you should add a null at the end of temp.

temp[j] = '\0';
1
  • @chux I think what you're suggesting is an improvement.
    – matt
    Jul 26, 2017 at 14:29
4

Matt's answer works but you can do it too:

This exemple is without call to system function: strlen. Here we don't need it. It's a bit optimize.

i = 0;
int j = 0;
while (s[i] != '\0')
  {
    if (s[i] == ' ')
      {
        temp[j] = s[i];
        j++;
      }
    i++;
  }
temp[j] = '\0';

Don't forget the '\0' at the end of your string.

2

Matt already provided an answer for what you asked.

What you probably want or need can also be achieved a bit easier. If you don't want spaces, just avoid adding them in the first place:

Replace your format string "%c" for strftime() which provides standard format for your locale with a string that creates directly what you want: "%a%b%d%T"

3
0

A bit more expensive, but you at least do not need another variable and as well have a valid string on each modification.

#include <string.h>

...

  size_t l = strlen(s);
  for (size_t i = 0; i < l; ++i) {
    if (s[i] != ' ') {
      memmove(s+i, s+i+1, l-i+1); 
    }
  }
0

You can squeeze spaces out in place, using standard library functions. Given that the string is very short and there's only a few spaces, performance won't suffer much.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <string.h>

int main() {
    time_t t = time(NULL);
    struct tm *tm = localtime(&t);
    char s[64];
    strftime(s, sizeof(s), "%c", tm);
    printf("before: %s\n", s);

    for ( char *p = strchr(s, ' '); p ;  p = strchr(p, ' ') )
        strcpy(p, p+1);

   printf("after: %s\n",s);

}

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