9

I have solved a Y-combinator problem. Just now I found that I cannot reference a generic parameter recursively.

Y = λf.(λx.f (x x)) (λx.f (x x))

for example:

IntUnaryOperator fact = Y(rec -> n -> n == 0 ? 1 : n * rec.applyAsInt(n - 1));

IntUnaryOperator Y(Function<IntUnaryOperator, IntUnaryOperator> f) {
    return g(g -> f.apply(x -> g.apply(g).applyAsInt(x)));
}

IntUnaryOperator g(G g) {
    return g.apply(g);
}

//        v--- I want to remove the middle-interface `G`
interface G extends Function<G, IntUnaryOperator> {/**/}

Q: How can I use generic parameter on the method g to avoid introducing an additional interface G, and the generic parameter should avoiding the UNCHECKED warnings?

Thanks in advance.

  • 2
    I’m pretty sure it’s not possible. Java doesn’t provide a way to require that a given generic parameter is a functional interface AFAIK. – Ry- Jul 26 '17 at 21:15
4

You can declare a generic method with a recursive type definition

<G extends Function<G, IntUnaryOperator>> IntUnaryOperator g(G g) {
    return g.apply(g);
}

What doesn’t work, is to invoke this method with a lambda expression, assigning the lambda expression to G. The specification says

15.27.3. Type of a Lambda Expression

A lambda expression is compatible in an assignment context, invocation context, or casting context with a target type T if T is a functional interface type (§9.8) …

and G is not a functional interface, but a type parameter, and there is no way to infer an actual interface type for G here.

That still works, when you use the actual interface G for the lambda expression:

IntUnaryOperator Y(Function<IntUnaryOperator, IntUnaryOperator> f) {
    return g((G)g -> f.apply(x -> g.apply(g).applyAsInt(x)));
}

// renamed the type parameter from G to F to avoid confusion
<F extends Function<F, IntUnaryOperator>> IntUnaryOperator g(F f) {
    return f.apply(f);
}

// can't get rid of this interface
interface G extends Function<G, IntUnaryOperator> {/**/}

or

IntUnaryOperator fact = Y(rec -> n -> n == 0 ? 1 : n * rec.applyAsInt(n - 1));

IntUnaryOperator Y(Function<IntUnaryOperator, IntUnaryOperator> f) {
    return this.<G>g(g -> f.apply(x -> g.apply(g).applyAsInt(x)));
}

// renamed the type parameter from G to F to avoid confusion
<F extends Function<F, IntUnaryOperator>> IntUnaryOperator g(F f) {
    return f.apply(f);
}

// can't get rid of this interface
interface G extends Function<G, IntUnaryOperator> {/**/}

So the method g is generic with no dependency to the interface G, but the interface is still required to be used as target type for the lambda expression.

| improve this answer | |
  • yes, I just found the type variable can be reference recursively too. and the problem is occurs in lambda expression. thanks very much sir. e.g: g(null) works fine, but g(g -> null) can't work. – holi-java Jul 27 '17 at 19:06

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